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Questions about applying to the Police Department - would I be an effective candidat?

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  • jchughes05
    replied
    Maybe Jerusee wishes to jump AHEAD and just go straight into a Conservator of the Peace position with all his fancy booklearning, numbers, and big words...

    Seriously, you WILL put in at least 3 - 10 years on the road before moving from Patrol to something else. In many larger agencies it could be 2 - 5, in small ones, like mine, it's at least 3 to 5. NO Special Unit is going to take anyone who was not worth a damn on the road... Patrol is the basis of police work, EVERYTHING works off of those skills and that experience.

    Leave a comment:


  • Lady Blue
    replied
    Originally posted by L-1 View Post
    Mark Twain once said that a man who carries a cat home by the tail is going to learn more in 30 seconds than if he spent years studying up on the subject.

    The same thing applies to our profession. Standing at the door with a diploma or two in hand doesn't cut it. You learn the job by performing it for an extended period of time and can only advance after demonstrating that you have thoroughly learned your craft and are ready to move to the next level.

    The profession is a lot more complex than most people think. It's interesting to see how people's attitude changes as they grow and learn on the job. It goes something like this -

    1 to 3 years on (Patrol) - I know everything. No one can teach me anything.

    4 to 7 years on (Investigator) - Damn, there's a lot more to this job than I thought. I've got to scramble and keep learning.

    7 to 10 years on (Supervisor) - Every time I turn around there's a new area of this profession I never knew about that I need to learn. I can't keep up. My brain hurts.

    10 years and over (Manager) - There are more specialized aspects to this job that any one person can be proficient at. I need to keep a fresh list of individuals with expertise in as many fields as possible so I can turn to them when I get stuck.

    There is a ton of truth in this.

    Leave a comment:


  • Zeitgeist
    replied
    I work in a large Urban dept. Everyone starts at the same pay--recruit pay. After you graduate, those with Associates and Bachelors degrees start at a higher rate. (no provision for those holding a Masters) You are required to work the streets a MINIMUM of 3 years before you can test for Detective. At 5 years you can test for Sgt. but most that are promoted at 5 years are pretty lackluster as supervisors.
    Your Finance background would serve you well in what I investigate--Major Fraud. The Master's degree would possibly help once you get above Lieutenant/Management.

    We do have non-sworn criminal analysts but the pay is pretty dismal.

    Unless you work in a very affluent area, you will need to talk 'street talk' or you have no 'cred' with your customers, regular citizens or criminals.
    ie: 'you on paper?' 'what's your government name?'

    There is a big difference between 'Sir, please comply' and 'Get the F##k on the ground or I'll blow your head off'
    Last edited by Zeitgeist; 08-17-2014, 09:06 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Iowa #1603
    replied
    Originally posted by L-1 View Post

    The profession is a lot more complex than most people think. It's interesting to see how people's attitude changes as they grow and learn on the job. It goes something like this -

    1 to 3 years on (Patrol) - I know everything. No one can teach me anything.

    4 to 7 years on (Investigator) - Damn, there's a lot more to this job than I thought. I've got to scramble and keep learning.

    7 to 10 years on (Supervisor) - Every time I turn around there's a new area of this profession I never knew about that I need to learn. I can't keep up. My brain hurts.

    10 years and over (Manager) - There are more specialized aspects to this job that any one person can be proficient at. I need to keep a fresh list of individuals with expertise in as many fields as possible so I can turn to them when I get stuck.
    NEVER has this been stated better

    Leave a comment:


  • L-1
    replied
    Originally posted by Jerusee View Post
    I believe there may be a degree of misinterpretation in some of the responses within this thread, as it was not my intention to denote that I wanted the "Gravy" without earning it. I have done years of schooling in order to attain my BA along with my MBA, and I have years of work experience to produce a high degree of applicable expertise. My questions were rather simple in that all I desired to know was if I would be given a pay grade increase for my education, and if everyone must start out doing the same job function. I want to join the PD so I may utilize my knowledge, and my expertise towards the greater good of mankind. It is the purpose of existence I am seeking as well as the fulfillment of life, and it is with the PD that I want to tangibly actualize those desires.

    It is entirely true that I desire to start out at a higher grade/rate than that of someone who is joining straight out of High School, and my reasoning for this is my education in tandem with my work experience. I see nothing wrong or invalid with this line of rational as it provides motivation for individuals with graduate degrees to want to join the PD, and if I am not mistaken that has been one of the objectives of the PD as of recent years.

    City jobs along with Federal jobs have been pushing to accelerate their recruitment of individuals with higher education over the past decade, and this is for two primary reasons. The first is for broader representation among psycho-social demographics while the second is to increase their internal pool of assets, and in this case assets would be operationally defined as variance of expertise among employees. I have every intention of starting out as a patrolman if that is what I must do, and I have every intention of advancing to a position where I may best utilize my degree/s as well.
    Mark Twain once said that a man who carries a cat home by the tail is going to learn more in 30 seconds than if he spent years studying up on the subject.

    The same thing applies to our profession. Standing at the door with a diploma or two in hand doesn't cut it. You learn the job by performing it for an extended period of time and can only advance after demonstrating that you have thoroughly learned your craft and are ready to move to the next level.

    The profession is a lot more complex than most people think. It's interesting to see how people's attitude changes as they grow and learn on the job. It goes something like this -

    1 to 3 years on (Patrol) - I know everything. No one can teach me anything.

    4 to 7 years on (Investigator) - Damn, there's a lot more to this job than I thought. I've got to scramble and keep learning.

    7 to 10 years on (Supervisor) - Every time I turn around there's a new area of this profession I never knew about that I need to learn. I can't keep up. My brain hurts.

    10 years and over (Manager) - There are more specialized aspects to this job that any one person can be proficient at. I need to keep a fresh list of individuals with expertise in as many fields as possible so I can turn to them when I get stuck.

    Leave a comment:


  • PhilipCal
    replied
    Originally posted by Jerusee View Post
    I believe there may be a degree of misinterpretation in some of the responses within this thread, as it was not my intention to denote that I wanted the "Gravy" without earning it. I have done years of schooling in order to attain my BA along with my MBA, and I have years of work experience to produce a high degree of applicable expertise. My questions were rather simple in that all I desired to know was if I would be given a pay grade increase for my education, and if everyone must start out doing the same job function. I want to join the PD so I may utilize my knowledge, and my expertise towards the greater good of mankind. It is the purpose of existence I am seeking as well as the fulfillment of life, and it is with the PD that I want to tangibly actualize those desires.

    It is entirely true that I desire to start out at a higher grade/rate than that of someone who is joining straight out of High School, and my reasoning for this is my education in tandem with my work experience. I see nothing wrong or invalid with this line of rational as it provides motivation for individuals with graduate degrees to want to join the PD, and if I am not mistaken that has been one of the objectives of the PD as of recent years.

    City jobs along with Federal jobs have been pushing to accelerate their recruitment of individuals with higher education over the past decade, and this is for two primary reasons. The first is for broader representation among psycho-social demographics while the second is to increase their internal pool of assets, and in this case assets would be operationally defined as variance of expertise among employees. I have every intention of starting out as a patrolman if that is what I must do, and I have every intention of advancing to a position where I may best utilize my degree/s as well.






    No, there is absolutely NO misinterpretation of any aspect of your original post, nor in your subsequent replies. Here it is in brief. YOU came to us with a question. YOU received honest, straight from the shoulder replies, which by the way, are an o.com trademark. However, being the rather self entitled individual you are, you neither liked, understood, or appreciated the replies we gave you.

    That is your problem. We have another poster on these forums, rather a regular, who seems to have the same problem you do. The need to impress other people with what you consider uncommon and noteworthy knowledge. In point of fact, neither of you are really special, and are noteworthy only in a seeming need to convince others that you are indeed, special.

    In your particular case, should you successfully navigate the selection process, which is highly doubtful given your elitist attitude, you'd still be required to start at the same level ANY other entry level officer would.

    Sorry if our replies have disappointed you, but the assumption is that you were after the truth. You got it Skippy, now deal with it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Iowa #1603
    replied
    Originally posted by Jerusee View Post
    Would you be willing to admit that perhaps it is not my own self that is the sole issue here, but rather the possibility of your perception being jaded due to past experiences in dealing with certain individuals?
    What I admit is that if you came into an interview talking the way you are writing------------I would be turned off and consider you to be a potential high maintenance employee and more work that I would be willing to take on. I would most likely vote against hiring you.

    A large part of being a cop is being part of a TEAM----my gut feeling is you wouldn't get along well in most law enforcement agencies. That gut feeling comes from experience. Almost 38 yrs of-----with nearly half of that time as a supervisor. During that time I have worked with officers who have much more education than you--------and lots more work experience. No one who has SUCCEEDED (in my meager experience) spoke like you write.

    Yes, I have been exposed to a couple over the years that acted the way you do.......which is another reason I say what I do.

    Leave a comment:


  • jrd_1980
    replied
    I would side with Iowa..education doesn't entitle you to start anywhere else but the bottom in law enforcement. What it may get you is a small percentage of a base pay increase over those that do not have education beyond high school. I typically see 2% for an Associate Degree and 5% for a Bachelor's Degree. Your education does not give you applicable or high expertise...that is what being on Patrol is for, so that you can learn how to work the streets. Keep in mind this is coming from someone who is one class away from a Master's Degree. If it is all about money for you, please find another profession that will care about your paper weights.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jerusee
    replied
    Would you be willing to admit that perhaps it is not my own self that is the sole issue here, but rather the possibility of your perception being jaded due to past experiences in dealing with certain individuals?

    Leave a comment:


  • Iowa #1603
    replied
    Originally posted by Jerusee View Post
    I believe there may be a degree of misinterpretation in some of the responses within this thread, l.
    There really is no misinterpretation------------------------you are trying to impress with your knowledge of the language and you are obtaining the opposite effect.

    You are coming off as being a snob..................................you can deny it all you want, and it may not be your intention..........but that is the impression you are making.


    You are talking (writing ) like a textbook--------------that is NOT the way people talk. Come down a peg and try again.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jerusee
    replied
    I believe there may be a degree of misinterpretation in some of the responses within this thread, as it was not my intention to denote that I wanted the "Gravy" without earning it. I have done years of schooling in order to attain my BA along with my MBA, and I have years of work experience to produce a high degree of applicable expertise. My questions were rather simple in that all I desired to know was if I would be given a pay grade increase for my education, and if everyone must start out doing the same job function. I want to join the PD so I may utilize my knowledge, and my expertise towards the greater good of mankind. It is the purpose of existence I am seeking as well as the fulfillment of life, and it is with the PD that I want to tangibly actualize those desires.

    It is entirely true that I desire to start out at a higher grade/rate than that of someone who is joining straight out of High School, and my reasoning for this is my education in tandem with my work experience. I see nothing wrong or invalid with this line of rational as it provides motivation for individuals with graduate degrees to want to join the PD, and if I am not mistaken that has been one of the objectives of the PD as of recent years.

    City jobs along with Federal jobs have been pushing to accelerate their recruitment of individuals with higher education over the past decade, and this is for two primary reasons. The first is for broader representation among psycho-social demographics while the second is to increase their internal pool of assets, and in this case assets would be operationally defined as variance of expertise among employees. I have every intention of starting out as a patrolman if that is what I must do, and I have every intention of advancing to a position where I may best utilize my degree/s as well.

    Leave a comment:


  • jrd_1980
    replied
    Iowa...no I haven't been on hiring boards and I am sure it is common that people mention wanting to be SWAT or CSI. I just simply stated that is not all people. For those who say they want to be SWAT/CSI or whatever specialty without doing Patrol, I would not want to hire those folks as you have to put in your time before earning a specialty. With departments having web pages and such, applicants can easily go to those pages of the departments they are interested in and find out where they have to start. I wouldn't want someone to go CSI if they can't even research a department.

    Kieth...thank you for your service as well and no hard feelings.

    Leave a comment:


  • Iowa #1603
    replied
    Originally posted by jrd_1980 View Post

    **Be careful putting labels on individuals. I am a Army Veteran with an IT background, bachelor's degree, and prior law enforcement experience and I wanted to work Patrol. I will be starting with a Sheriff's Office in a few months after my military contract is complete and I will obviously be assigned Patrol, which is want I want before moving up the ladder. You need to take a knee and drink water as military members would say.

    You obviously have not been involved with HIRING law enforcement officers, have you?

    ANYONE who has interviewed prospective LE officers in the last 15 or so years has had their fill of candidates asking the questions that Kieth talks about----------------------it doesn't have to be ex-MILITARY candidates either but like he states-------------science geeks, etc

    It is what it is---------------------------yea we are happy to get people who really want to be cops--------------------but trust me, we get a whole lot of people who just want the gravy without earning it

    Leave a comment:


  • CCCSD
    replied
    Wait. What? It's not?

    Leave a comment:


  • Shush
    replied
    On a side note.... Criminal Minds is just a TV show and Reed is just a character. It's not real life.

    Leave a comment:

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