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  • Hip injury.

    A little back brief before I start bugging you all with questions.

    I'm currently in the active duty component in the U.S. Army and I have one year left in my contractual agreement. Recently (January of this year), I suffered a serious fall from a height of two stories. I landed stiff, with my legs fully extended, causing a tremendous amount of pain to radiate from my right hip, and for three days after the incident, I found myself unable to put any more than 40% of my body weight on my right leg without feeling the tremendous pain.

    With 1 being no pain at all, and 10 being pain so unbearable that I fall unconscious, I would accurately and confidently rate it a 7. I made an appointment with an Army doctor and she ordered an X-Ray and MRI to be safe. If anyone (I'm sure plenty are) is prior service, they know that Tricare's gears roll a bit slower than most, and I didn't manage to get my X-Ray and MRI done until around May. After completing my X-Ray, no major issues were present. However, after completing my MRI, the PA received the results in 3 days later. The MRI shows a small (around 1/8 of an inch) tear in my labral band. The band works as a bumper for my femur joint that connects the femur head to the hip socket. They also noted a small bone spur that could possibly have been pushed up with the impact from the fall. Surgery is extremely invasive, and the Doctor at our local Orthopedics essentially told me in a professional way, that he's never done it before but is willing to give it a try. Of course he didn't word it that way, but that's at least how I perceived it. With the surgery, I will be unable to walk for at least 3 months. After that, rehabilitation will be around 14 months. I have only 12 months left in the Army and this is causing some conflicts, as I had plans to honorably discharge and immediately start applying to local LEA's.

    Fast forward to now, I have no issues walking on my hip. I feel no pain, however I feel a snapping feeling that's easily ignored, it's almost as if you're driving down a paved road, and then it shoots quickly to a dirt road and then back to paved. Hard to explain, but it's /not/ that big of an issue anymore. I am able to run, but not long distance. Unfortunately, my job description (Infantry) involves long distance runs. A 1-3 mile run will not cause excess pain. It might be uncomfortable, but I'm a grown man and I've felt pain before, I'll tough it out. A 5-8 mile run, however, will start to cause a sharp, pinching feeling deep in my socket. I am on my feet all day at work, upper body exercises, Army Combatives, and short runs are still being incorporated into my daily life. But I've talked to a few people who underwent the same surgery or similar surgeries, and they've all told me that their "condition" was worsened by the surgery. If I refuse the surgery, the Army will give me a medical discharge. But if I take the surgery, it will potentially leave me disabled and unable to accomplish common tasks, let alone my intentions of becoming a law enforcement officer.

    So to the point, enough babbling from me. My questions are:

    1.) Are applicants who received medical discharges for being unfit for /military/ duty, essentially deemed unit for /law enforcement/ duty?

    2.) Would an injury like this cause me to even make it through the application phase?

    I appreciate the advisement in advance.
    Prospective.

  • #2
    Originally posted by RClar93 View Post
    1.) Are applicants who received medical discharges for being unfit for /military/ duty, essentially deemed unit for /law enforcement/ duty?
    It depends


    Originally posted by RClar93 View Post
    2.) Would an injury like this cause me to even make it through the application phase?
    It depends



    A person---------------doesn't matter if it is a military veteran or not has to be able to perform the functions of a Law Enforcement Officer.

    If you can pass the state mandated (or department mandated) PAT----you have for the MOST part met the physical requirements of the job.

    But once again IT DEPENDS

    Certain pre-existing conditions MIGHT disqualify you from employment. Those conditions are determined by the agency and their medical underwriters
    Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

    My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

    Comment


    • #3
      I was medically retired after 16 years with Type I (insulin dependent) diabetes, a spine fusion from L4 to S1, and a number of other small issues that in total give me a VA disability rating of 70%. I'm currently a sheriff's deputy and completed the academy at age 43.

      Originally posted by RClar93 View Post
      1.) Are applicants who received medical discharges for being unfit for /military/ duty, essentially deemed unit for /law enforcement/ duty?
      Not necessarily. It depends on how you recover and how you handle any reduced capability. It took me a few years to get back on my feet, and I'm only about 80% of where I was prior to my injury, but I've found ways to overcome and compensate. My 80% is still better than many people's 110%.

      Individual agencies have their own policies and standards, and some states have minimum standards, that I wouldn't pass. In Colorado at the department I work for I'm fine. You have to get yourself well, and get back to your maximum capability, then see where you stand.

      2.) Would an injury like this cause me to even make it through the application phase?
      Yep. The medical information is really nobody's business until you get a conditional offer and have your medical exam. Then, you explain it to the doc. Research the medical standards of your state and the agencies you apply to, and apply to the ones you can qualify for. If you can pass a PAT and the academy you'll probably have no problem in a jail or on the street. If you're concerned, self-sponsor and show the agencies that you passed the academy with no problems, you can use your GI Bill to pay for it.

      FIRST, however, you need to get yourself fixed up. As a retiree I have more options than you will. You do NOT want to rely on the VA to help solve your medical problems. Get them fixed on active duty. Your ETS will be pushed back, but that's OK because you'll be getting three squares and a paycheck while you're recovering.

      Get fixed up, get yourself up to snuff, then see where you are. You can be attending college classes in the interim as well, which will make you look even better.
      "I am a Soldier. I fight where I'm told and I win where I fight." -- GEN George S. Patton, Jr.

      "With a brother on my left and a sister on my right, we face…. We face what no one should face. We face, so no one else would face. We are in the face of Death." -- Holli Peet

      Comment


      • #4
        I appreciate the realistic replies.

        My biggest fear is getting a surgery intended to repair me, and having the exact opposite happening.
        Prospective.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by RClar93 View Post
          I appreciate the realistic replies.

          My biggest fear is getting a surgery intended to repair me, and having the exact opposite happening.
          I had a surgeon tell me a few years ago "I can fix the broken. That doesn't mean that everything will be perfect, or like before, but it will be better than it was before I started."
          Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

          My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

          Comment


          • #6
            OK, What I would suggest you do is review, as in re-read, the advice of my colleagues. Take a real good look at Post #3.

            Now with all of that said, and it's possible I missed it, you say you fell from an approximately two story height. I get the impression you didn't seek immediate medical help. If not, why not??

            It's really none of my business either way, I'm just curious.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by PhilipCal View Post
              OK, What I would suggest you do is review, as in re-read, the advice of my colleagues. Take a real good look at Post #3.

              Now with all of that said, and it's possible I missed it, you say you fell from an approximately two story height. I get the impression you didn't seek immediate medical help. If not, why not??

              It's really none of my business either way, I'm just curious.
              Phil, if you reported everytime you fell and broke a hip you'd never be off the phone. I think you're upset cause he's more man than you.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by RClar93 View Post
                My biggest fear is getting a surgery intended to repair me, and having the exact opposite happening.
                That's always a risk, albeit very small, with any surgery. One way to minimize risk is avoiding the doctor who's "never done it before but is willing to give it a try".

                Get a second opinion from a sports medicine specialist.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Michigan View Post
                  Phil, if you reported everytime you fell and broke a hip you'd never be off the phone. I think you're upset cause he's more man than you.






                  Yeah, that's what happens when you try to leap tall buildings in a single bound.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by TheTick
                    To OP: Check your PMs
                    Thank you, I replied and I appreciate you taking time to give that guidance.

                    Originally posted by PhilipCal
                    OK, What I would suggest you do is review, as in re-read, the advice of my colleagues. Take a real good look at Post #3.

                    Now with all of that said, and it's possible I missed it, you say you fell from an approximately two story height. I get the impression you didn't seek immediate medical help. If not, why not??

                    It's really none of my business either way, I'm just curious.
                    If you are considering immediate medical help as an ambulance, or the emergency room, I can't answer that question with any other answer besides "I don't know", haha. But within 12 hours I was at the Troop Medical Clinic. I've twisted my back up on road marches, rolled ankles, I lost all feeling in my arms when a mortar misfired in my hands during a live fire and I wasn't braced for the concussion. My leadership has always brushed it off as "part of the job" so I'm assuming I have adapted that same mindset throughout my life.
                    Prospective.

                    Comment

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