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Resumes and the Applicaiton Process

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  • Resumes and the Applicaiton Process

    I've seen many times on application packets that state "resumes will not be accepted in replace of filling out this form" or similar and goes on to state something similar to "feel free to submit a resume as well".

    My Question on this is, What factor do resumes take on the oral board?

    Obviously they don't have to be submitted but what, if anything does an applicant gain by submitting their resume with their application? They still get the spot on the oral board, is it just something else for the officers to ask about and get to know you?

  • #2
    If they submit one, submit one. If they say don't submit one, don't. Stop asking irrelevant questions which the answers don't matter to you. Use this same advice if and when you start FTO.

    To answer your actual question: resumes don't play any "factor" on the oral board. You're talking about apples and oranges. Just do as your told.

    Comment


    • #3
      When conducting a BI, I compared a candidate's resume to the application and to information from previous employers. It probably won't shock most of you, but people sometimes lie or at lease embellish to pad a resume.

      As for any type of oral board, they probably won't even see the resume unless it they are confronting the candidate about inconsistencies.

      “This life’s hard, but it’s harder if you’re stupid.”

      George V. Higgins--The Friends of Eddie Coyle

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      • #4
        ANYTHING submitted that is not asked for usually ends up in the small circular file next to the HR supervisors desk........................Occasionally the entire package ends up there.


        A major part of the application process is FOLLOWING DIRECTIONS. Failure to follow simple directions can (and WILL in many cases) disqualify you for consideration.
        Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

        My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

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        • #5
          It won't have any impact on an oral board. A resume fills out the skeleton, which is the application, since some applications don't provide much blank space for meaningful answers. Some people need a resume, some people don't.

          Comment


          • #6
            If the application materials explicitly state that you may include a resume, I would because it's one more way to make yourself stand out. If it says not to, or doesn't mention it, don't -- the application is sufficient.

            That said, I included a cover letter, which wasn't part of the instructions, and it worked for me.

            Comment


            • #7
              As has been noted to you, many agencies neither desire , or require a resume. This is especially true in Civil Service processes. OTH, if the agency requests or requires a resume, you submit one.

              Once more, and this has been noted to you, a trait all agencies are looking for is the ability to understand and follow, simple instructions.

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              • #8
                I do not know much about the hiring process for LE, but I do for private sector. So that is what I am speaking to in my comments.

                The purpose of a resume is as a supplement to the application, which would still also be required. This gives the HR department, as well as hiring manager, a chance to see things about you. Its easy to say "I have a bachelors in English" on an application, and another to see how you USE that degree is writing (as example). When I review a resume, I can get a good sense about what a person thinks about themselves as well. It becomes evident in the styles, formats, and wording. Your resume reveals a LOT about you as a person as well as your education and how it compares to your stated education. I can determine if a person is confident and able to take control of a project and run with it based on the words used and the writing style.

                Now if I take that same process and apply it to LE (completely in theory on my part) - I would think the same would still hold true. However, that would not necessarily be a good thing. If you are a bit TOO confident in your writing style, it could potentially indicate that you are a bit of a loner or not a team player unless its your way. In reverse, it may reveal that you are a bit too reserved and not able to present a command presence. Both would be speculative on the part of the interviewer, as they wouldn't know you, but it would give them a chance to form opinions.

                Life lesson -- whenever it is possible to eliminate the opportunity of a person forming opinions before they meet you, then do so. You will never change the mind of someone who has already formed an opinion.

                Yeah, I am feeling long winded today. But to sum it up - a resume in private industry is your friend. In the same ways that it IS your friend in private industry, it seems it could be your enemy in the LE review process.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Adding to what DaleG said –

                  Civil service hiring is completely different from the private sector. In civil service the primary purpose of an application is to determine whether you possess the minimum qualifications for admission to the testing process for the job you applied for. Beyond that, your hirability is determined by your combined test scores from the written and oral civil service exams which are designed to measure your ability to perform the duties of the job you are seeking.

                  In civil service, resumes are considered to be self serving and akin to putting lipstick on a pig. However, they are good for catching applicants embellishing and in lies.
                  Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by DaleG View Post
                    I do not know much about the hiring process for LE, but I do for private sector. So that is what I am speaking to in my comments.

                    The purpose of a resume is as a supplement to the application, which would still also be required. This gives the HR department, as well as hiring manager, a chance to see things about you. Its easy to say "I have a bachelors in English" on an application, and another to see how you USE that degree is writing (as example). When I review a resume, I can get a good sense about what a person thinks about themselves as well. It becomes evident in the styles, formats, and wording. Your resume reveals a LOT about you as a person as well as your education and how it compares to your stated education. I can determine if a person is confident and able to take control of a project and run with it based on the words used and the writing style.

                    Now if I take that same process and apply it to LE (completely in theory on my part) - I would think the same would still hold true. However, that would not necessarily be a good thing. If you are a bit TOO confident in your writing style, it could potentially indicate that you are a bit of a loner or not a team player unless its your way. In reverse, it may reveal that you are a bit too reserved and not able to present a command presence. Both would be speculative on the part of the interviewer, as they wouldn't know you, but it would give them a chance to form opinions.

                    Life lesson -- whenever it is possible to eliminate the opportunity of a person forming opinions before they meet you, then do so. You will never change the mind of someone who has already formed an opinion.

                    Yeah, I am feeling long winded today. But to sum it up - a resume in private industry is your friend. In the same ways that it IS your friend in private industry, it seems it could be your enemy in the LE review process.
                    One of the problems we see on this forum all the time is that many applicants want to equate Corporate World to Law Enforcement...............................The problem is, they aren't related.

                    Look at all the exemptions that LE has in
                    A. wage and hour laws
                    B. Social Security deductions
                    C. Collective Bargaining.
                    D. The use of Polygraphs for hiring

                    and you can see that LE is considered "different" in the workplace.
                    Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

                    My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

                    Comment

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