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  • Another classes/certificates that will enhance my credentials.

    Hello all!
    First off, I want to thank all of you for your service.
    I am 20 years old and turn 21 years old in September. Its coming!
    I am at a community college finishing up my Associates degree in Criminal Justice. This summer I am taking a cpr course to get certified in CPR and also going to get take my pistol permit course. I believe it will be good to own the "glock 22" and get a feel for it. That way when it comes time for the shooting range and all at the academy I am very comfortible with it.
    Anyways back to my question. I was wondering if theres any other courses/certificate courses other then the ones that I listed that I can take to enhance my credentials.
    I have already done two ride-a-longs and looking to do more this summer.
    Thank you for your time and hope all of you have a great day!

  • #2
    Sorry to break it to you, but a CPR cert and owning a Glock aren't going to enhance your credentials. If you want to enhance your credentials start working on a four year degree when you are done with your two year degree. Start to learn whatever foreign language is spoken in the area you want to work. Establish a stable work history and a history of good decision making.

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    • #3
      In addition to my colleague's thoughts, I'd add this. In the event you enter a Civil Service process, or a process remotely resembling a Civil Service process, all the certificates, ride alongs, and firearms certifcations aren't going to amount to jack.What will be required, what will be vitally neccesary , is that you test well on the written exam. While a score of 70% is usually a "passing" grade, to advance in the process, you'll need to score in the mid to high nineties at a minimum. The writen exam score is often weighted with your score on the Oral Board in order to place you on an eligibilty list for hire. These proccesses are often very lengthy, frustrating, and highly impersonal. With respect to firearms proficiency: should you be hired, the Department will teach you to shoot....their way. That being the case, I don't think I'd be too concerned about shooting at present. Education: Education is always a plus, and many agencies are requiring more and more of it. Almost any degree is helpful, and it does NOT have to be in CJ or a related discipline. Once more, the written exam will be your first major hurdle. It is of the utmost importance that you score highly on it.

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      • #4
        Languages; especially Spanish and American Sign Language.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by jakflak View Post
          Languages; especially Spanish and American Sign Language.
          + 1000

          I recommend looking into purchasing materials from learnables.com Don't risk lowering your GPA in the event you don't do so well and you really can learn a second language on your own.
          Best of luck to you. And don't do anything crazy for your 21st Birthday!
          Judge me by the enemies I have made----Unknown

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          • #6
            Look at FEMA, there are free online certifications you can get for NIMS, ICS as first responder (Law Enforcement) and others. These are free cetifications and can give you college credits.

            http://training.fema.gov/IS/crslist.asp
            GOD IS A NINJA WITH A SNIPER RIFLE, WAITING TO TAKE YOU OUT.

            "For weapons training they told me to play DOOM"

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            • #7
              Originally posted by PhilipCal View Post
              In addition to my colleague's thoughts, I'd add this. In the event you enter a Civil Service process, or a process remotely resembling a Civil Service process, all the certificates, ride alongs, and firearms certifcations aren't going to amount to jack.What will be required, what will be vitally neccesary , is that you test well on the written exam. While a score of 70% is usually a "passing" grade, to advance in the process, you'll need to score in the mid to high nineties at a minimum. The writen exam score is often weighted with your score on the Oral Board in order to place you on an eligibilty list for hire. These proccesses are often very lengthy, frustrating, and highly impersonal. With respect to firearms proficiency: should you be hired, the Department will teach you to shoot....their way. That being the case, I don't think I'd be too concerned about shooting at present. Education: Education is always a plus, and many agencies are requiring more and more of it. Almost any degree is helpful, and it does NOT have to be in CJ or a related discipline. Once more, the written exam will be your first major hurdle. It is of the utmost importance that you score highly on it.
              Originally posted by jakflak View Post
              Languages; especially Spanish and American Sign Language.
              ^^^ Sage Advice^^^^

              Here is what you need to get hired

              Solid job/work history (even if it is non paid volunteer time or internships)
              Good academic credentials (in other words-----a degree in a discipline that interests you enough to end up with a good GPA)
              The ability to pass the Civil Service test.
              Be in moderately good physical condition
              AND MOST IMPORTANTLY
              The ability to have the patience to get through the hiring process which at times can be lengthly.

              THE PROBLEM with training you receive outside the LE system is it might not be relevant.

              CPR................various agencies conduct CPR training (Red Cross---American Heart Association) . Your CPR card might not be recognized by your department.

              I have yet to see a civilian handgun course (purely civilian) that mimics the depth of Law Enforcement agency training . You could very well pick up habits and "training" that would give you trouble during the academy.

              Your Glock might not be the issue weapon for your agency...................you would still need to transition into the issue weapon.
              My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

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              • #8
                Thanks for all of the great information. Although I am in school getting my CJ degree, I was just wondering if there was anything else I could do right now other then study and get physically fit. I am just trying to do as much as I can to put me ahead of someone else!
                Anyways Thank you very much for all the information.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by falconstailback4 View Post
                  Thanks for all of the great information. Although I am in school getting my CJ degree, I was just wondering if there was anything else I could do right now other then study and get physically fit. I am just trying to do as much as I can to put me ahead of someone else!
                  Anyways Thank you very much for all the information.
                  As Philipcal said, your success in getting hired will depend on how high you score in civil service exams. Those exams measure your ability to actually perform the duties of the position you are seeking.

                  For every civil; service exam there is usually an exam announcement. Buried deep in the fine print of the exam announcement they usually tell you what you will be tested on. Nobody bothers to read the fine print. You need to be the exception. Read about what the test covers and study those areas. This should give you a leg up on those who think they will breeze past everyone in the process armed with nothing more than a bunch of certificates, a well written resume, a fancy suit and an expensive haircut.
                  Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I can't add much to what's already been stated, however, with respect to the firearms proficiency I will tell you this. If you have NO experience with a firearm whatsoever, DO NOT buy a gun and begin learning to shoot if you do in fact envision going through a Police Academy. If you are a blank-slate right now with firearms, keep it that way. You'd be surprised at how much better a blank-slate does in the firearms portion of the Academy than someone who has learned different techniques, bad habits and THEN tries to relearn everything the Academy is teaching. If you are a blank-slate, don't ruin it.

                    If you want to focus on something, focus on physical fitness. It's an area that WILL be important during the process, the Academy, FTO, and the rest of your career. It's also something you can focus on which doesn't have the downfall of developing bad habits, and it doesn't cost a thing (no, you don't need a gym membership to get in-shape; I would put a LOT of emphasis on running).

                    -V

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by GIOSTORMUSNRET View Post
                      Look at FEMA, there are free online certifications you can get for NIMS, ICS as first responder (Law Enforcement) and others. These are free cetifications and can give you college credits.

                      http://training.fema.gov/IS/crslist.asp

                      I currently volunteer for an Emergency Mangagement Agency in my area and am required to take several of the NIMS courses. Should I be submitting these courses when I apply to agencies or not?

                      Also, I have my EMT-B license as I am trying to get on to a volunteer FD, do you think this positively or negatively affects me as an applicant.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by zimmerman_pm View Post
                        I currently volunteer for an Emergency Mangagement Agency in my area and am required to take several of the NIMS courses. Should I be submitting these courses when I apply to agencies or not?
                        The purpose of an application is to determine whether you possess the minimum requirements for admission to the testing process. If possession of these certificates is a minimum requirement for the job and they require proof of this training then submit them. If not, don't.

                        We routinely throw away training certificates, letters of recommendations, commendations, transcripts, etc,. that come attached to applications because they have nothing to do with the application, we have not asked for them and they have no weight in our process for measuring whether the applicant is capable of actually performing the duties of the job.

                        Originally posted by zimmerman_pm View Post
                        Also, I have my EMT-B license as I am trying to get on to a volunteer FD, do you think this positively or negatively affects me as an applicant.
                        I don't know. Is having an EMT-B license one of the requirements of the position? If so, it may help. If not, it may be meaningless. OTOH, if it the policy of the VFD not to provide EMT level care because overall they do not have the training, expertise and liability insurance to routinely do so, your desire to act as an EMT on runs and put them in a position of civil liability risk they are not insured for may discourage them from hiring you.
                        Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

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                        • #13
                          Rather than some class that won't amount to squat......volunteer. Don't care for who but volunteer. Won't cost you a penny and means a lot in the hiring process.

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                          • #14
                            To the op, we're in the same boat... I'm a AJ/CJ major as well. I'm not a LEO yet, but I have some advice for ya too.

                            First off, if you don't have much experience with guns, don't take shooting/marksmanship classes! I'm close to 20 and I've been shooting just about every gun you can think of (not illegal ones though!) since I was 7 years old. However, a lot of it will be thrown out the window when I hit the academy and I'll have to be taught all over again. If you do take classes, just take a really basic course so you'll atleast be comfortable around guns. Wouldn't hurt, but just don't get into advanced classes.

                            I would check with your local Red Cross chapter and see if they need any volunteers/interns. From what I've heard, police depts. like folks who have spent time in "public service" type areas. Many depts. also want interns, I'm currently in the process of becoming one at my local dept. and have a interview scheduled next wends. There are also cadet programs you can get into. I would take a day and just visit every dept. in your area face to face. Just ask them what opportunities they offer.

                            Best of luck to you,

                            Evelyn

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by evelynsg View Post
                              To the op, we're in the same boat... I'm a AJ/CJ major as well. I'm not a LEO yet, but I have some advice for ya too.

                              First off, if you don't have much experience with guns, don't take shooting/marksmanship classes! I'm close to 20 and I've been shooting just about every gun you can think of (not illegal ones though!) since I was 7 years old. However, a lot of it will be thrown out the window when I hit the academy and I'll have to be taught all over again. If you do take classes, just take a really basic course so you'll atleast be comfortable around guns. Wouldn't hurt, but just don't get into advanced classes.

                              I would check with your local Red Cross chapter and see if they need any volunteers/interns. From what I've heard, police depts. like folks who have spent time in "public service" type areas. Many depts. also want interns, I'm currently in the process of becoming one at my local dept. and have a interview scheduled next wends. There are also cadet programs you can get into. I would take a day and just visit every dept. in your area face to face. Just ask them what opportunities they offer.

                              Best of luck to you,

                              Evelyn
                              Evelyn

                              You are in the Ask A Cop section----------------openly stating you are not a LEO....................and not following the rules of the forum by posting in the restricted area.

                              That is a good way to get banned from the board.
                              My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

                              Comment

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