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Do departments give different rejection letters for non-select vs. DQ?

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  • Do departments give different rejection letters for non-select vs. DQ?

    I know this question most likely varies from department to department, but I was still wondering, will department usually let you know whether you have been DQ'd or simply not selected? For example, if one was eliminated due to something in their background, would the department send a letter stating that they "do not meet the qualifications for police officer," but if the candidate was simply passed over for another candidate would the letter then state that they were, "moving forward with more qualified candidates." Or, would it be more likely that no matter the reason a candidate was dropped, they would get the "more qualified candidates" letter?
    "If the police have to come get you, they're bringing an @$$ kicking with them!"
    -Chris Rock

  • #2
    Depends and there is no standard so there is no way you will get a definitive answer.

    So, which letter are you expecting?
    Calling an illegal alien an "undocumented immigrant" is like calling a drug dealer an "unlicensed pharmacist"

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    • #3
      Simple answer--------------------yes.

      But of course nothing is simple. As my colleague noted ----there is no standard, but if you read carefully and with a detached mind, you will be able to tell the difference.

      Many times you will be thanked for your interest and informed that the department chose a person that "fit" the department better. Sometimes you will be invited to apply again for the next opening or that your application remains on file. That type of answer is kind of promising . A short letter stating that you were not selected is less promising.

      Usually, however, the letter will be in legalese and not say anything firm other than you were not selected,...............the lawyers are involved in every facet of this profession.
      Last edited by Iowa #1603; 01-16-2011, 08:02 AM.
      Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

      My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

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      • #4
        Originally posted by BigDog4907 View Post
        Depends and there is no standard so there is no way you will get a definitive answer.

        So, which letter are you expecting?
        The latter was the one I got. I finished my background, my investigator told me that every bit of information I gave him was spot on, I was prompt in getting everything he asked of me, I showed excellent integrity and, in his personal opinion, I would make a good police officer. However, he said that I was 1 of about 10-15 people left and that only about 3 to 5 would get to the next stage (chief's interview) and so his opinion really didn't mean much.

        I got a letter two weeks later telling me that I was no longer in consideration and that they were moving forward with more qualified applicants. If I remember correctly, it did say that, while they had no plans to hold another hiring process in the near future, I could apply whenever they did.
        "If the police have to come get you, they're bringing an @$$ kicking with them!"
        -Chris Rock

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        • #5
          I don't know how it works where you are but in my state, applicants are hired based on the order of their combined civil service test scores. Highest combined score gets picked first, second highest score, goes next, third highest goes next, etc. They also have something called the Rule of Three, which allows them to fill a vacancy by selecting anyone from the top three scores on the list (1,2 or 3). If they pick #2, 1, 3 &4 become the top three scores for the purpose of filling the next vacancy. If they pick #4 this time, #1,3 &5 become the top three scores for the purpose of filling the next vacancy. It goes on that way until the list is exhausted or expires.

          If things work in a similar fashion where you are, it sounds like you were close to the top of the list but not high enough to be reachable. You were probably sent a background package in case one of the higher ranking applicants was specifically DQed for cause and removed from the list, or if an applicant waived a job offer, which would have allowed the department to reach farther down the list to your position.

          Once a position is filled and no vacancies are foreseen in the distant future, it is not unusual for smaller departments to abolish the hiring list and hold a new test when a new vacancy arises in the future, so applying again should not be a problem.
          Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

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          • #6
            Originally posted by L-1 View Post
            I don't know how it works where you are but in my state, applicants are hired based on the order of their combined civil service test scores. Highest combined score gets picked first, second highest score, goes next, third highest goes next, etc. They also have something called the Rule of Three, which allows them to fill a vacancy by selecting anyone from the top three scores on the list (1,2 or 3). If they pick #2, 1, 3 &4 become the top three scores for the purpose of filling the next vacancy. If they pick #4 this time, #1,3 &5 become the top three scores for the purpose of filling the next vacancy. It goes on that way until the list is exhausted or expires.

            If things work in a similar fashion where you are, it sounds like you were close to the top of the list but not high enough to be reachable. You were probably sent a background package in case one of the higher ranking applicants was specifically DQed for cause and removed from the list, or if an applicant waived a job offer, which would have allowed the department to reach farther down the list to your position.

            Once a position is filled and no vacancies are foreseen in the distant future, it is not unusual for smaller departments to abolish the hiring list and hold a new test when a new vacancy arises in the future, so applying again should not be a problem.
            My colleague's reply very much mirrors State of Alabama Merit System (Civil Service) Exams. The only real notable difference is that in Alabama, an agency head may choose from the top ten candidates, provided of course he/she has that many vacancies to fill.
            All of my colleagues have provided you with excellent replies. I urge to read them again when you can. What I gather in your particular situation is the fact that you were simply "Not Selected" in this particular process. In the simplest of terms, a Non Select simply means, that for any one of a number of reasons, you didn't make the cut. O T H, a Disqualification means that for any number of reasons, a Background Investigation determined that you met that agencies criteria for Disqualification. At the end of the day, you know your background better than any of us. Provided background is not an issue, you should continue to apply.

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