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Did I just hurt my chances of working in LE?

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  • Did I just hurt my chances of working in LE?

    An update.....All the tests were negative and everything has checked out to be fine.
    Last edited by ybtj; 09-07-2010, 10:54 AM.

  • #2
    Outshined,

    There is a DIFFERENCE between "officers on meds" and applicants. It is not uncommon for officers to develop a medical problem due to work. That's why you may "know" some officers who are taking meds.
    Free Deke O'Mally!!!

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    • #3
      It's really difficult to answer your question with any precision. Any medical condition has to be judged in light of a Department's medical standards. I'm not qualified to give you a medical reply. That said, I'll offer you this. It's quite possible that your condition would raise an eyebrow or two. Again, whether or not it's a DQ will have to be determined by the Agency you apply to.

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      • #4
        You should be fine as long as you can articulate the circumstances and your medical records are consistent with your reasons.
        " The Beatings will continue until Morale Improves "

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        • #5
          You should be ok as long as you make it to/and pass the psych evaluation. I was on an anti-anxiety medication before I got hired. Anxiety doesn't run in the family, I just had a very bad experience one time that triggered it.

          Note: This is for my department, others may/will differ.

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          • #6
            It is going to depend on your condition at the time you apply, along with your recent history just prior to that.

            Take a look at http://lib.post.ca.gov/Publications/Gastro.pdf and read the section on IBS. It will explain the implications of IBS for police personnel and tell you how the condition is viewed for applicants. While these are California guidelines and standards will vary from agency to agency, the principles behind them are fairly common throughout the country.
            Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

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            • #7
              When you say IBS I think of only one thing. What do you mean by IBS?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by bobbyvegas View Post
                When you say IBS I think of only one thing. What do you mean by IBS?
                Irritable bowel syndrome.
                Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

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                • #9
                  Im no doctor or psychiatrist but I would say you might get past the IBS thing being a cop.... correct me if I'm wrong here but a "gun" and "anxiety symptoms" don't sound like a good mix to me. Just my opinion.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by bobbyvegas View Post
                    Im no doctor or psychiatrist but I would say you might get past the IBS thing being a cop.... correct me if I'm wrong here but a "gun" and "anxiety symptoms" don't sound like a good mix to me. Just my opinion.
                    With respect to IBS, anxiety symptoms create a more freequent need to urgently go to the bathroom. The have little to do with one's mental or emotional capacity to handle a firearm.
                    Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

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                    • #11
                      Thank you for your responses guys.
                      Last edited by ybtj; 03-19-2010, 12:12 PM.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by ybtj View Post
                        I think you're a little confused about what IBS is. I already carry a firearm for personal protection.
                        No, I'm not confused. I was just trying to keep it polite. To better meet you need for accuracy I will rephrase -

                        Among other things, IBS may present as chronic recurring bouts of diarrhea. Although this condition is characterized by an absence of detectable pathology, it may have a negative impact on a patrol officer's performance as psychological stress my trigger an exacerbation of symptoms in some patients. This is particularly relevant given the high degree of emotional stress involved in a patrol officer's position.

                        As I said before, this has little to do with one's mental or emotional ability to handle a gun. It all pertains to bowel control. If you can't control them in the field, you may have difficulty getting hired.

                        My answer to your original inquiry still stands. Your ability to be hired is going to depend on your condition at the time you apply, along with your recent medical history just prior to that.

                        Take a look at http://lib.post.ca.gov/Publications/Gastro.pdf and read the section on IBS. It will explain the implications of IBS for police personnel and tell you how the condition is viewed for applicants. While these are California guidelines and standards will vary from agency to agency, the principles behind them are fairly common throughout the country.
                        Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by L-1 View Post
                          No, I'm not confused. I was just trying to keep it polite. To better meet you need for accuracy I will rephrase -

                          Among other things, IBS may present as chronic recurring bouts of diarrhea. Although this condition is characterized by an absence of detectable pathology, it may have a negative impact on a patrol officer's performance as psychological stress my trigger an exacerbation of symptoms in some patients. This is particularly relevant given the high degree of emotional stress involved in a patrol officer's position.

                          As I said before, this has little to do with one's mental or emotional ability to handle a gun. It all pertains to bowel control. If you can't control them in the field, you may have difficulty getting hired.

                          My answer to your original inquiry still stands. Your ability to be hired is going to depend on your condition at the time you apply, along with your recent medical history just prior to that.

                          Take a look at http://lib.post.ca.gov/Publications/Gastro.pdf and read the section on IBS. It will explain the implications of IBS for police personnel and tell you how the condition is viewed for applicants. While these are California guidelines and standards will vary from agency to agency, the principles behind them are fairly common throughout the country.
                          I apologize, my comment was directed at bobbyvegas, not you, because he said I should not be handling a firearm. As you stated, this has nothing to do with my mental ability to handle a gun.

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                          • #14
                            Anxiety is a mental disorder. If the agency requires a psychological examination, which most do, you will probably find that you will most likely NOT be recommended for the job. Because of your anxiety.

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                            • #15
                              Just a few symptoms out of about 100 from anxiety. I would say that some of these if not all of the ones I have listed might be a bad mix with a firearm. Feel like you are going to pass out or faint. Electric shock feeling, body zaps. Feel wrong, different, foreign, odd, or strange. Hyperactivity, excess energy, nervous energy. STARTLE EASILY! Trembling or shaking.
                              And this is the only one I saw about Frequent bathroom use: Urgency to urinate, frequent urination, sudden urge to go to the washroom (similar to urinary tract or prostate infection symptoms) out of 100 symptoms
                              And if your doctor prescribes you xanax I can tell you with a definite answer that you should not carry a firearm, because being on xanax is just like being drunk. Now I'm not saying you have these symptoms I'm am posting only to show that while it may be a bowel control issue there is alot more involved than just frequent and uncontrolled bowel movements.

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