Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Schoo me on the importance of polygraphs

Collapse

300x250 Mobile

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Schoo me on the importance of polygraphs

    I'm new to the law enforcement application process and have discovered that polygraphs seem to be the norm, at least in California. I guess I'm surprised because in law school I've taken evidence classes, one taught by a former federal prosecutor and another taught by a defense attorney, and they both claim that the actual results are pretty pointless. Both seemed to allude that it's basically an interrogation tool. As someone who currently does a lot of negotiation on the corporate level, I can totally see how the setting and such can could be leveraged quite a bit against a subject.

    On a personal level, I know that during the year plus long process of getting hired at the CIA, my sister was told she failed her polygraph multiple times, literally coming home in tears, with the questions that she supposedly showed stress on utterly absurd. For perspective, she's a PhD in Chemical Engineering, and for a woman to get to that level she basically was nothing other than a workaholic nerd who certainly wasn't selling state secrets to foreign agents as her poly examiner claimed. But again, seeing the distress it caused her, I can see how it's an effective tool to interrogate someone. That said, when you see a family member broken down by it, not an appealing one. Thankfully, after the 3rd or 4th they stopped bothering her, she was hired, and later made it all the way to the Whitehouse for security briefings.

    So, that's really my only working knowledge of the polygraph and it's not favorable in the sense that I believe in the measured results. Was the information I learned in evidence class wrong and was my sister's personal experience an outlier, beyond the statistical norm of accuracy?

    The other thing that surprises me a bit are automatic disqualifiers based on arbitrary things like # of times you've used X substance. We have a sitting president, and current candidates that apparently would be auto-DQ'd from a police application but are and may be Commanders in Chief. Again, I get that it's important to vet out substance abuse from a rubber meets the road public safety profession. But, I would figure that drug testing would be more effective at doing that versus punting someone who crossed some threshold in their past but is beyond that. For lawyers we just go through a character review, which is like a rubber stamped background check. Doctors, who arguably not only have access to drugs, but also people's lives in their hands also aren't precluded from their license based on these standards.

  • #2
    Polygraphs are a joke. You can flip a coin with equal accuracy
    The greatest misconception in police work that gets more officers killed is alot of cops are still taught to use the "minimum force necessary". In reality a true professional will always resort to the "Maximum Allowable Force" to resolve a situation. They mean the same thing, however one is a restriction and the other is an empowerment.

    Comment


    • #3
      I'm certain my reply is not going to solve any controversy regarding the Polygraph. Essentially, it's an investigative tool. You're very correct in that it's use is pretty much the norm in LE hiring processes. In the "ideal" scenario, the applicant is advised of all the questions which will be asked in the exam. It's at this time that he would advise the examiner of any replies which might cause a reaction from the machine. Ideally, there are no surprises. Quite often, exam results are "inconclusive", or replies given requiring additional clarification. In these instances, the applicant is usually offered the opportunity to take an additional exam. Keep in mind, that the Polygraph Examiner merely reports his/her findings to others in the hiring process. You should also know that I'm not a Polygraph Examiner. I'm merely attempting to provide you with some information relative to your post. Actually, my views concerning the use of the Polygraph are pretty immaterial. Currently, the use of the machine is pretty much the norm in the hiring process. You'll probably hear quite a few views which don't favor the use of the Polygraph. I personally respect those views, but, as I noted, the machine is here to stay, at least for the foreseeable future.

      Comment


      • #4
        I'm no expert, but an examiner friend once said women will do poorly in some questions due to their insecurities about certain things.

        Comment


        • #5
          polygraphs are an important tool in the criminal justice and always work accurately.......just like a ouija board

          Comment

          MR300x250 Tablet

          Collapse

          What's Going On

          Collapse

          There are currently 5891 users online. 307 members and 5584 guests.

          Most users ever online was 26,947 at 07:36 PM on 12-29-2019.

          Welcome Ad

          Collapse
          Working...
          X