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How many of you actually practice quick-draw

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  • How many of you actually practice quick-draw

    Where you are standing almost nose to nose with the suspect and for whatever reason you need to draw your weapon but have no room to extend your arm, and simply fire once your weapon is out?

    I actually think this might be a more realistic and likely scenario so I try to practice this move every time I go to the range.

  • #2
    We train like that some while at the range, just shooting from rock & lock. Definately have to be extra cautious doing it, but certainly good to practice it.

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    • #3
      It's part of the USBP's standard qual.

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      • #4
        I thought all agencies practice that. It's called "Contact Shooting" (i.e. shooting "from the hip")
        The sheep generally do not like the sheepdog. He looks a lot like the wolf. He has fangs and the capacity for violence. The difference, though, is that the sheepdog must not, cannot and will not ever harm the sheep. Any sheepdog who intentionally harms the lowliest little lamb will be punished and removed.

        I Am the Sheepdog.


        "And maybe just remind the few, if ill of us they speak,
        that we are all that stands between
        the monsters and the weak." - Michael Marks


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        • #5
          The Maine qualification course includes drawing and firing single and multiple shots at short distances. We've also practiced other techniques at contact distances.
          Personally, whenever I practice I work on drawing and firing "up close and personal" double and triple taps as well as putting about half a mag into the target from the draw. I figure that at that distance I'm not going to stop shooting to see if the first couple of rounds worked. I also work on head shots and reengaging the target after my initial "volley".

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          • #6
            First, any cop voluntarily standing nose-to-nose with a suspect/suspicious person contact is asking for trouble.

            However, when the dignity of choice is taken away:

            1) My previous department trained us to raise our non-gun hand/arm in a blocking motion, then draw and fire our duty weapon in a double-tap.

            2) My new department utilizes the state qual course, drawing and firing 2X, from the hip, at about three feet away.

            By the title of your thread, I thought you were talking about "fastest gun in the west" style drawing...which I don't know of anyone who ever did...seriously.

            When acquiring a new double-, or triple-retention, holster the manufacturers often suggest a minimum of 200 draws to condition both the holster (and the user) to make sure it works smoothly.
            "You're never fully dressed without a smile."

            Pain is inevitable, suffering is optional.

            Three things I know for sure: (1) No bad deed goes unrewarded, (2) No good deed goes unpunished, and (3) It is entirely possible to push the most devoted, loyal and caring person beyond the point where they no longer give a 5h!t.

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            • #7
              Our state post requires close quarters drills to be taught in the academy and the post qual course. We also incorporate it into our qual course. We do it from a few feet away because if you contact shoot a paper target it tends to shred it and you have to put up a new one every time. We also teach/practice it in our inservice training.
              The early bird may get the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.

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              • #8
                Even if you don't practice it, it's valuable to know just how fast a practiced person can draw a weapon from let's say, a waistband and put several rounds accurately in a target. There used to be a training video shown that was a clip from a Miami Vice episode. In this clip a limo driver drew a pistol from the waist and "Mozambiqued" two cops that had guns drawn on him. The significant point to the training aspect of the clip was that the shooting part was real. This guy could draw and get off 6 accurate shots in under 2 seconds.

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                • #9
                  FYI, the guy in the movie was either Rob Leatham or another professional, competitive shooter! (I read about his participation in the film, but forget the specific shooter involved.) He is one of those sponsored pros who spends literally hours practicing his shooting techniques, every day he isn't actually in competition.

                  What was presented was real, but neither cops nor the typical crooks encountered routinely on the street have that kind of expertise. One thing about "bad guys" is that few of them have that level of discipline. If they did, they'd probably be successful in fields that didn't result in incarceration. Men and women who shoot at the level of that guy in "Miami Vice" are disciplined to the point that they have very little life outside of practice and serious matches, using whatever tool they've chosen.
                  "I'm not fluent in the language of violence, but I know enough to get around in places where it's spoken."

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by pulicords View Post
                    FYI, the guy in the movie was either Rob Leatham or another professional, competitive shooter! (I read about his participation in the film, but forget the specific shooter involved.) He is one of those sponsored pros who spends literally hours practicing his shooting techniques, every day he isn't actually in competition.

                    What was presented was real, but neither cops nor the typical crooks encountered routinely on the street have that kind of expertise. One thing about "bad guys" is that few of them have that level of discipline. If they did, they'd probably be successful in fields that didn't result in incarceration. Men and women who shoot at the level of that guy in "Miami Vice" are disciplined to the point that they have very little life outside of practice and serious matches, using whatever tool they've chosen.
                    His name is Jim. His real last name is different from his screen name so I'll leave that part off. He was a pro shooter at one time but just a character actor when that MV bit was filmed. His SAG profile mentions his competitive speed shooter background under the additional skills section.
                    I think it's worth knowing just how fast a gun can be deployed by someone that plans it, even if they are not currently in the speed-shooting top ten. Not that the average cop on the street is going to out-draw the practiced crook; but to not let the shooter get into a position they can be effective from.

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                    • #11
                      1. Movies are magic - but not real life. I knew "Jim" years ago when I lived in SOCAL. He was very good, but it's all easy when the director says "One More Take"
                      2. I have seen Robbie Leatham draw and fire in under 1/2 second. Competition holster, a timer, but no chance of anyone shooting back.
                      3. No One stands 25, 15, or even 2 yards away and yells "Your money or your life" . So you are far more likely to get involved at contact distance. Thus, for officers and CCW holders, this is a useful skill.
                      "A man who has nothing which he cares about more than he does about his personal safety is a miserable creature who has no chance of being free, unless made and kept so by the existing of better men than himself."
                      John Stuart Mill

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                      • #12
                        When I was working a gig as a federal security officer, we had a guy that would practice his “quick draw” problem was he did this in front of everyone, in the guard shack, during guard mount, in the id lane when traffic was slow, heck just about any time he had a second or two. There was more than one occasion that people went ducking under whatever for cover, pretty scary situation to say the least any how after he would do the quick draw he would do the old western finger spin and re holster. One day I was bound and determined that this was going to stop, so I took a fire cracker and just as he was doing his thing, I lit it ……..BANG scared the **** out of him he thought he fired the weapon (everyone else was in on it by the way) we all ran out of the guard shack yelling and screaming we made a huge scene, we broke old boy down to tears it just so happens that the stupidvisor came up (un expectedly I might add) and old boy admitted to screwing around and discharging his weapon. The supervisor was an old Marine sergeant major so he could chew some *** (it was also his first day on the job) and boy did he. The hero of the story received a 15 day suspension; I still fail to understand why it took so long for someone to take action for the unsafe act but never the less he has never attempted his act again outside of the range area.
                        It could be that the purpose of your life is only to serve as a warning to others.

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                        • #13
                          As with anything else, there is a time and a place for it.
                          "A man who has nothing which he cares about more than he does about his personal safety is a miserable creature who has no chance of being free, unless made and kept so by the existing of better men than himself."
                          John Stuart Mill

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                          • #14
                            i practice my draw/point shoot from my duty rig as well as from concealment quite regularly. i'm a firm believer that anybody can stand there and punch holes in paper, so i practice the stuff that doesn't always result in tight little ego boosting groups. like shooting while seeking cover, shooting while trying to create distance, etc.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Defender77 View Post
                              Where you are standing almost nose to nose with the suspect and for whatever reason you need to draw your weapon but have no room to extend your arm, and simply fire once your weapon is out?

                              I actually think this might be a more realistic and likely scenario so I try to practice this move every time I go to the range.
                              It's part of our quals...on a side note, I practice (at Home) quite frequently when I have a new holster, especially if it is a different rig altogether. I spent about two weeks working on it when I went to a level III the first time.
                              A Veteran is someone who at one point in their life wrote a blank check made payable to The United States of America, for an amount up to, and including their life. That is honor, and there are way too many people in this country today, who no longer understand that fact!

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