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  • Questions about domestic violence

    Do you think that mandatory restraining orders in DV cases unfairly discriminate against men?

    Do you think DV laws, VAWA, or other matters pertaining to DV protect men as adequately as they protect women? If so, what are some ideas you may have that could correct this?

    Do you think there are adequate available resources for men who are victims of DV? (Shelters, treatment/therapy, support)?

    Is it harder for a man to successfully get a restraining order or protection order if he is the one who is the victim?

    (Note: I hope it's not politically incorrect to ask these questions....my aim is not to offend, but to gain understanding.)

    To all who answer: I know these are difficult questions to respond to, and I want to thank you for your effort.
    Last edited by TERA; 07-20-2008, 01:31 AM.

  • #2
    Originally posted by TERA View Post
    Do you think that mandatory restraining orders in DV cases unfairly discriminate against men?.
    Yes, mandatory anything is dumb.

    Originally posted by TERA View Post
    Do you think DV laws, VAWA, or other matters pertaining to DV unjustly target males?.
    No

    Originally posted by TERA View Post
    Do you think there are adequate available resources for men who are victims of DV? (Shelters, treatment/therapy, support)?.
    I haven't met a male victim yet. I mean, come on.... Most men would pack their crap and go.

    Originally posted by TERA View Post
    Is it harder for a man to successfully get a restraining order or protection order if he is the one who is the victim?.
    Not around here, they'll hand them out to anybody.

    Originally posted by TERA View Post
    (Note: I hope it's not politically incorrect to ask these questions....my aim is not to offend, but to gain understanding.)

    To all who answer: I want to thank you.
    "Why is common sense so rare?" - Me

    By the way.. They aren't "Clients" or "Customers" they're CRIMINALS... sheesh

    Comment


    • #3
      In Az., IMO "the system" DOES discriminate against men. While the law covers everyone, realistically it's hard for guys to admit to being DV victims, although I have had a few. Judges seem hestitant to issue ROs against women & even when presented with proof, rarely give temp. custody to the father & I know of NO shelter for male DV victims. Given those deficiencies, I'd said males are discriminated against.

      Comment


      • #4
        Sometimes the DV laws act as a big club the gal can keep next to her bed so she can afford to go with the tough guy and the nice guy loses.

        Comment


        • #5
          The laws are the same, but public perception is different. Its a lot harder for a man to say he was battered and be perceived as a victim than it is for a woman.

          That said, I have had arrests of female batterers sucessfully go to trial, getting both misdemeanor and felony convictions for domestic battery and intimidation.

          Domestic violence cases, as a whole, have low conviction rates because the victims have a tendency to not show up to court, to recant their story, or to otherwise throw a wrench in the works because they are all in love again. It seems like men who will make the report and give a taped statement are more likely than women to fail to follow through. I think a lot fewer men will make the initial call, though. Motiviation seems to be somewhat different, too. Men are more likely to want the perpetrator to get pysch treatment/rehabilitation and return to the family life with the victim and kids as opposed to punishment and seperation.
          I miss you, Dave.
          http://www.odmp.org/officer/20669-of...david-s.-moore

          Comment


          • #6
            Men can certainly be the victims of DV. They don't "pack their crap and go" for a lot of reasons women don't "pack their crap and go.

            Mandatory arrests provide a lot of opportunity for abuse and, in my opinion, don't solve anything, but it does let the politicians say they are tough on crime.

            Comment


            • #7
              Everything related to DV is equal. Most DV shelters cater to the women. Anyone can request a restraining order...however most men are too proud and figure the courts cater to the women.

              Your questions are not difficult to answer at all. I believe the public views DV as a crime against women. I've arrested more women for DV because they are usually the primary aggressor.

              It's kind of like child custody...the woman usually gets custody of the kids right? Wrong...both are entitled.
              This profession is not for people looking for positive reinforcement from the public. Very often it can be a thankless job and you can't desire accolades, because those are not usually forthcoming. Just do your job to the best of your ability and live with the decisions you've made.

              Comment


              • #8
                To answer your question from our viewpoint, I’ll run-down on the process for our DV Protection Orders.

                Firstly, when an application for a DV Protection Order is made, it is regarded as a civil matter. Only when a breach of release conditions or a breach of the order has occurred, does DV become a criminal matter. An Application for a DV Protection Order can be made by any person or by Police, provided a domestic relationship exists between the parties involved.

                If we are sent to a job involving a disturbance between 2 people who are in a domestic relationship with each other and there is evidence of domestic violence (Injury to either party, damage to property, or threats to do same by either party) and we form a reasonable suspicion that domestic violence is likely to continue after obtaining versions from both parties, we're compelled by our law to make an application for a Domestic Violence Protection Order regardless whether or not the Aggrieved (Victim) or the Respondent (Suspect) want it. If the Aggrieved does not wish to make a complaint of Assault or Wilful damage, there’s nothing we can do about that. We then go about applying for a Domestic Violence Protection Order, which includes detaining the Respondent for a period of up to 4hrs if necessary while making that application. Once the Application has been completed, both parties receive a copy and they’re both required to attend court to have the matter heard so they can present their side of the incident and any history that has been alleged so the magistrate can determine if a DV Protection Order is necessary. The Respondent is released from custody with release conditions so if he or she breaches those conditions, he/ she can be charged. Where both parties are determined to be equally at fault, cross orders can be applied for (Positions for both parties are reversed in the other order).

                All or our Protection Orders have 2 mandatory conditions – The Respondent is not to commit acts of domestic violence which includes wilfully injuring the Aggrieved, or any named person in the order, or wilfully damaging property (Property includes any property in the relationship, regardless of ownership, that the Aggrieved has received an entitlement to use and her personal property) and the Respondent is to be of good behaviour to the Aggrieved and is not to commit acts of associated domestic violence (Threaten to injure the Aggrieved or any named persons, and not to threaten damage property). The Aggrieved can request additional conditions on these Orders.

                So in answer to your questions:
                1. No – Myself and other officers have applied for DV Protection Orders where the male is named as an Aggrieved. Although over here it has been proven that the majority of males are named as the Respondent
                2. Yes.
                3. No, however this is an area which is slowly improving. and
                4. No.
                If at first you don't succeed, remove all evidence of your attempt.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I can't remember the statistic off the top of my head for male victims of DV but I know its very very low, maybe into the single digits.

                  However, when I was doing MP work in CA I can recall two incidents of DV where the male (and Marine of the household) was the victim. One was the male simply said, "I don't hit my wife." She socked him in the mouth and the neighbors called 911 over the commotion. She was charged with domestic assault.

                  The other was both parties were Marines. I don't remember who called but the male claimed that his wife beat him up when we arrived. He had a nice cut on his head to prove it. The wife claimed that they were 'sparring' and they did it all the time. Because apparently they both did martial arts or some BS.

                  I think male victim DV is drastically under reported. There is also a lot more mutual combat these days. SD had its DV written aimed at the 'primary aggressor'. Even if the female popped the male but he was being aggressive and created the incident he could still be charged with the DV and she would not get charged. Of course this applies for females too not just males.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by just joe View Post
                    Men can certainly be the victims of DV. They don't "pack their crap and go" for a lot of reasons women don't "pack their crap and go.
                    In Ohio, yes, I'll give you that. I've been there and seen some of the women. The ones that aren't gigantic are just plain nuts (I almost got married to one.. Yikes(a crazy one that is)).

                    But in the rest of the world girl on guy domestic "violence" is really more like foreplay.

                    True victims, like a lot of other crimes, are few and far between (meaning= don't want to get shot? Don't hang around in the projects at 2 am).

                    Most of the repeat domestic violence offenders/victims (depending on the day of the week) THRIVE on it. If there wasn't some sort of constant chaos in their life they would shrivel and die.

                    Originally posted by just joe View Post
                    Mandatory arrests provide a lot of opportunity for abuse and, in my opinion, don't solve anything, but it does let the politicians say they are tough on crime.

                    Can't argue with that. Darn, I like to argue.
                    "Why is common sense so rare?" - Me

                    By the way.. They aren't "Clients" or "Customers" they're CRIMINALS... sheesh

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by TERA View Post
                      Do you think that mandatory restraining orders in DV cases unfairly discriminate against men?

                      Mandatory anything is a waste of resources

                      Do you think DV laws, VAWA, or other matters pertaining to DV protect men as adequately as they protect women? If so, what are some ideas you may have that could correct this?

                      Yes, the law does not specify gender.

                      Do you think there are adequate available resources for men who are victims of DV? (Shelters, treatment/therapy, support)?

                      There are few men that actually report DV even though I'm sure women do quite a bit of DV as the aggressor so there are fewer resources devoted to mens issues.

                      Is it harder for a man to successfully get a restraining order or protection order if he is the one who is the victim?

                      (Note: I hope it's not politically incorrect to ask these questions....my aim is not to offend, but to gain understanding.)

                      To all who answer: I know these are difficult questions to respond to, and I want to thank you for your effort.
                      I have arrested women before for being the primary aggressor and have no problem doing so. I dont really care if your man or woman...if you are making me respond to your house and you caused the problem you get to go to jail.

                      Comment

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