Ad JS

Collapse

Leaderboard

Collapse

Leaderboard Tablet

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Technical Difficulties Anyone?

Collapse

300x250 Mobile

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Technical Difficulties Anyone?

    How fast is your police department's technology catching up? I know discussions have been made on things like GPS and camcorder/mic on a person to capture video evidences and such.

    What I am curious to know is what are some of your biggest frustrations on the road technology wise, not even the fancy add ons but just the basics....?

    Like are you still filling out incident reports on paper and have to do data entry at another place by aother person and have to deal with bad handwritings and miscommunications? What technology do you wish could happen in your police department the most?

  • #2
    I like to joke that my agency will not adopt new technology until it is proven obsolete.

    My observation is it's really hard to come up with an integrated system. Example: All the LE agencies in my county use the Spillman Technologies RMS. The 911 dispatch uses CAD software from PRC Public Sector Inc. A limited interface between the two was constructed from scratch, at great expense, but leaves most data to be transferred by hand, if at all. Our RMS doesn't talk to the Municipal Court database at all. Our in-car video database is stand-alone. If you want to search for a recording, you do so by date and time; the videos are not marked with a case or dispatch number. And so on, and so on.

    At least every manufacturer's paper fits any typewriter and will go in any file cabinet.

    Comment


    • #3
      Haaaahhhh, my agency thinks anything made by neanderthals is cutting edge. We had to buy up LAPD's old MDT's when they went to MDC's just to keep ours going because the original manufacturer went out of business YEARS ago. We didn't give our troops hand held radios until the early 90's at the same time we got our MDT's that are still in use. We've been trying to field an MDC for probably 10 years with no luck on a routine basis. In car cameras forget about it.
      Today's Quote:

      "The difference between stupidity and genius is that genius has its limits."
      Albert Einstein

      Comment


      • #4
        Hmm, does the fact that our department gets hand-me-down computers from the public school system shed any light on our situation?

        Comment


        • #5
          So the ideal situation is perfect integration between RMS-Court database-CAD? How are the reports and evidences transfered to RMS and Court database now?

          Do any of you use electronic field reporting software that routes reporting documents and its attachments to supervisors for review?

          The point of me asking these highly technical questions is because there are some really cool field reporting software that does A LOT to make officer's lives easier, I don't know if anyone here is aware of that... and coming from their side, I just hope to know more of the officer's pain points with paper procedures.

          So feel free to throw out all of the tiniest things that bugs you from your current situatins, like having to fill out the same information over and over again on multiple forms...... or anything....!

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by diamond101 View Post
            So the ideal situation is perfect integration between RMS-Court database-CAD? How are the reports and evidences transfered to RMS and Court database now?
            Officer fills out paper with pen (press hard, you're making multiple copies)
            Officer gives paper to clerk who enters info in PD database, tears off 1 copy for file.
            Police clerk places paper in box for court clerk to collect.
            Court clerk collects paper and enters information in court database, places remaining copies in file.

            The Promised Land, at least for Washington cops, is eTRIP. The system is still field testing but a state trooper who uses it says he can issue a citation in under 4 minutes. The only paper is printed out by the issuing officer and given to the violator. The catch is while the State will provide the software free of charge, the individual departments will have to buy, and maintain, the hardware.

            The point of me asking these highly technical questions is because there are some really cool field reporting software that does A LOT to make officer's lives easier, I don't know if anyone here is aware of that... and coming from their side, I just hope to know more of the officer's pain points with paper procedures.
            I think if we're here, on this forum, we're aware of what can be done. The people we need to convince are the administrators, the ones who prepare the budgets and convince the city councils to allocate the funds. I think they see the old ways as meeting their needs quite nicely. The chief says, "I want to know how many speeding tickets were written on Main Street last month!" and somebody gives him the answer. The number wouldn't look any different if someone called it up with a few keystrokes instead of paging through a pile of tickets while making marks on a scratch pad.

            Comment


            • #7
              Is it...or what is...the law that requires all notes evidences between the officer and the supervisor approving the incident report to be shredded?

              I come from the software side, so my job is to convince those decision makers in the law enforcement industry to invest in a more efficient process.

              I totally understand that they aren't the ones out in the fields, and their paycheck comes from everyone's pocket (tax). So it's not their biggest concern to make things easier on those working on these procedures and doing all the unnecessary steps.

              Thanks for helping me gain a better insight into your pain points, and get a better argument for convincing those decision makers!

              Comment

              What's Going On

              Collapse

              There are currently 10185 users online. 506 members and 9679 guests.

              Most users ever online was 19,482 at 11:44 AM on 09-29-2011.

              Welcome Ad

              Collapse
              Working...
              X