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A Victim and Warrants

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  • A Victim and Warrants

    Recently, an arrest warrant was issued in connection with a burglary of my business. However, the suspect has not been found. What will happen if the suspect cannot be located?

  • #2
    Many suspects are hard to locate, and even if they are able to be found, law enforcement officers are too busy sometimes to even serve warrants on property offenses. If either of the case occurs, the warrant is on file. This burglar tripped up, and he will trip up again. Once he comes in contact with police again, whether it be another burglary, shoplifting, or even a traffic violation, your active (burglary) warrant will appear, and he will be booked for it. It could be a week later, or a year later, depending on the circumstances I mentioned. Sometimes there are even "round up" projects where several law enforcement agencies get together to serve old or existing warrants. They are funny on occasion and post the person's name in the media saying they won a prize. When the person shows up to claim it, they get booked.
    I'm 10-8 like a shark in a sea of crime..

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    • #3
      Burglary suspects are often transient, moving from location to location until arrested. If this takes awhile, don't be too concerned. The statute of limitations stops as soon as charges are formally filed (an arrest warrant is issued). You won't be contacted until the suspect is in custody and a preliminary hearing or trial is scheduled.
      "I'm not fluent in the language of violence, but I know enough to get around in places where it's spoken."

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      • #4
        What they said. ^^^

        It stays in the system.

        If he gets arrested by another agency, the agency who issued the warrant will pick him up once he is finished with that county.
        This profession is not for people looking for positive reinforcement from the public. Very often it can be a thankless job and you can't desire accolades, because those are not usually forthcoming. Just do your job to the best of your ability and live with the decisions you've made.

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        • #5
          Here in California, the warrant will be placed in the state computer system. If the District Attorney is willing to extradite, it will be placed in the national computer system as well.

          In the major metropolitan areas of California, just about everyone who comes in contact with the police (traffic violation, field interview under suspicious circumstances, etc.) gets run for warrants. If he is the kind of person who commits burglaries, your burglar will come to the attention of the police sooner or later and the warrant will be discovered during one of those contacts.

          If the suspect has a car, the warrant will be associated with its license plate number. This can be of great help in finding him. Officers sometimes routinely check the license plate of vehicles they come across while on patrol. If they run your suspect's plate, the computer will tell him there is a warrant associated with the vehicle and a stop will be made to see if the suspect is in the car.

          If your guy goes down to DMV to renew his registration, they DMV computer will be flagged to not renew the registration and to call the police.

          It may not be tomorrow or next week, but the odds are that they will get him. It just may take a while.
          Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

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          • #6
            Originally posted by L-1 View Post
            Here in California, the warrant will be placed in the state computer system. If the District Attorney is willing to extradite, it will be placed in the national computer system as well.

            In the major metropolitan areas of California, just about everyone who comes in contact with the police (traffic violation, field interview under suspicious circumstances, etc.) gets run for warrants. If he is the kind of person who commits burglaries, your burglar will come to the attention of the police sooner or later and the warrant will be discovered during one of those contacts.

            If the suspect has a car, the warrant will be associated with its license plate number. This can be of great help in finding him. Officers sometimes routinely check the license plate of vehicles they come across while on patrol. If they run your suspect's plate, the computer will tell him there is a warrant associated with the vehicle and a stop will be made to see if the suspect is in the car.

            If your guy goes down to DMV to renew his registration, they DMV computer will be flagged to not renew the registration and to call the police.

            It may not be tomorrow or next week, but the odds are that they will get him. It just may take a while.
            In addition to L-1's post. Alabama DPS does the same thing in regard to persons seeking to re-instate a Driver's License which has been suspended. The number of warrants found and arrests made is amazing.

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            • #7
              Unfortunately California has a happy history of issuing Felony Warrants with no extradition.

              I have lost count of how many CA NCIC Hits I have gotten that say no extradition.
              "People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf." - George Orwell
              8541tactical.com - Ammo Wallets

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Blackdog F4i View Post
                Unfortunately California has a happy history of issuing Felony Warrants with no extradition.

                I have lost count of how many CA NCIC Hits I have gotten that say no extradition.
                I think this is pretty common, at least in busy cities. I work for a sheriff's dept where we have a list of 16 crimes that we actually will extradite on. We have so many warrants in our system, being the busiest county in Michigan, it would cost a whole lot of taxpayers dollars to extradite on all of our felony warrants.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Blackdog F4i View Post
                  Unfortunately California has a happy history of issuing Felony Warrants with no extradition.

                  I have lost count of how many CA NCIC Hits I have gotten that say no extradition.
                  Man, and I thought we didn't do that! I've always been amazed by how many other states did that, all the time operating in my bubble of ignorance - thinking everyone else was cheap and/or lazy. Sorry I ever thought that, now.

                  We called them 'keep away' warrants. If a state says they'll only extradite from every state surrounding it...let's say the warrant is from Oregon, and they will only extradite from NV, CA, ID, and WA...where do you think the bad guy will go? Suddenly CO, NM, AZ, and WY are looking pretty attractive right about now.
                  "You're never fully dressed without a smile."

                  Pain is inevitable, suffering is optional.

                  Three things I know for sure: (1) No bad deed goes unrewarded, (2) No good deed goes unpunished, and (3) It is entirely possible to push the most devoted, loyal and caring person beyond the point where they no longer give a 5h!t.

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                  • #10
                    I thought this question was going to be about when you go to the call and the victim, or "victim" has a warrant. When it's a real victim (although... how many TRUE victims have warrant?), it sucks... but if it's a "victim" or just a general all around idiot, it's a lot of fun.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by revxus View Post
                      Recently, an arrest warrant was issued in connection with a burglary of my business. However, the suspect has not been found. What will happen if the suspect cannot be located?
                      Each year the case will be revisted by the Commonwealth or District Attorney and when he is apprehended you will more than likely receive a notice from the courts at the court date. In the mean time make contact with your area victim witness office and make needed insurance claims to take care of compensation you are due. The rest is up to us.
                      "Some people spend an entire lifetime wondering if they made a difference in the world. The MARINES don't have that problem." ....Ronald Reagan

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                      • #12
                        My county contracts with a national company, Transcor, so if they are arrested in another state, they will be picked up. In other words, you bag em, tag em, we pick em up.
                        "Blessed are the peacemakers, for they will be called Sons of God - Matthew 5:9

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by revxus View Post
                          Recently, an arrest warrant was issued in connection with a burglary of my business. However, the suspect has not been found. What will happen if the suspect cannot be located?
                          Well, nothing CAN happen uless the supect is found. The warrant will be put on the computer, so if anyone stops hm for any reason and runs him for warrants, it will appear and he'll be arrested.

                          But many guys sky when they find out they've got warrants and disappear. It may take a while to find him, so don't expect instant gratification.
                          "Say hal-lo to my leetle frahnd!"

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by CODE-30 View Post
                            I think this is pretty common, at least in busy cities. I work for a sheriff's dept where we have a list of 16 crimes that we actually will extradite on. We have so many warrants in our system, being the busiest county in Michigan, it would cost a whole lot of taxpayers dollars to extradite on all of our felony warrants.

                            I agree. Our DA makes the extradition decision, and they won't pay $2000 transportation charge to prosecute a $300 burglary.
                            "Say hal-lo to my leetle frahnd!"

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