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Can police officers give someone a ride home?

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  • Can police officers give someone a ride home?

    If someone needs a ride home or asks a police officer for a ride home are police officers generally allowed to do it? If they are allowed to give rides what is the procedure? Some people I know who are police officers say that they are discouraged by their department or even not allowed to give rides to civilians. I got a ride a few years ago after an accidents so I’m wondering if the policy might have changed in recent years?

    Edit: Apologize for this being posted multiple times. It came up as an error when I hit the post button the first time so I hit it 3 times.
    Last edited by EC912; 11-29-2022, 09:35 AM.

  • #2
    There has to be a good reason. Crime victim, lost elderly/ youth yes. Hot chick, no

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    • #3
      Yeah, no hot chicks allowed in the back of my car. Don't need those kinds of problems.

      Comment


      • #4
        Depends on the circumstances. Not a taxi service, but if someone is legitimately stuck or needs to be moved to a safe place (victim of a crime) and it's not gonna tie me up forever then yes. Just need to tell dispatch where we're going and document the mileage and if it's someone of the opposite sex. Generally we're not allowed to do it if there are a lot of calls pending or it will take us out of our beat/jurisdiction.

        I've also taken drunk people home to keep them out of jail and from me writing an arrest report if they aren't being an A/H

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        • #5
          Originally posted by clof2001 View Post
          I've also taken drunk people home to keep them out of jail and from me writing an arrest report if they aren't being an A/H
          Nope! That's a can of worms and a complaint waiting to happen right there. I'd rather do the arrest report. My opinion is, if you're gonna go out drinking, be responsible enough to have your ride home set up. The only time I or my guys give drunks rides home is with a misdemeanor ticket and released to a sober adult IF they're likely to be over the BAC restrictions to be booked into jail (ie, a trip to the ER for medical clearance).
          "He who fights with monsters might take care lest he thereby become a monster. And if you gaze for long into an abyss, the abyss gazes also into you."
          -Friedrich Nietzsche

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Bing_Oh View Post

            Nope! That's a can of worms and a complaint waiting to happen right there. I'd rather do the arrest report. My opinion is, if you're gonna go out drinking, be responsible enough to have your ride home set up. The only time I or my guys give drunks rides home is with a misdemeanor ticket and released to a sober adult IF they're likely to be over the BAC restrictions to be booked into jail (ie, a trip to the ER for medical clearance).
            I get it, but I work in a city of 150,000 and only 6 deputies on a shift. We probably get a dozen drunk calls every night with all the downtown bars and the homeless population combined. Average wait to book at the jail is 2 hours, and those jail nurses will send you straight to the hospital if your arrestee has a paper cut. Now you're sitting there for half your shift. If we brought in every drunk that was out there, we literally wouldn't be able to go to any other calls. And if they do get booked, they're usually out in less than 4 hours because the jail staff doesn't want them there either.

            So our sergeants allow to us to use our discretion and make sure the body worn cameras are rolling. We save the arrests for the people that really need to get off the street and we know are going to be a problem. Our DA doesn't allow us to cite for drunk, and they don't even prosecute the ones that get booked anyway. We have a chronic guy that's averaged 20 647f arrests a year, he's never spent more than a day in jail.

            If they can get in my car without barfing all over the place and someone is at home to put them to bed, I give them a ride.

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            • #7
              I work in a Connecticut city that's fairly busy. So if 20 calls are pending, your coworkers may not be happy. But with that being said, we are allowed to do it at any given time. We have a lot of flexibility and we aren't micromanaged like a lot of smaller departments.

              If it's a female passenger, we must state that to dispatch. You must also state your odometer reading at the start and end of the trip.

              I'll normally do it for homeless people that are trespassing in a public place that need to go to a warming shelter. Or someone involved in a car accident.

              Regarding the paranoia of transporting attractive women... that's what body cameras protect against. They protect us, as well the people we're transporting. Someone's attractiveness should have no implication on whether you can help them out and give them a ride. At the same time, we are not a taxi service. So I personally reserve it for people that have no ability to procure their own transportation.
              Last edited by NickG0103; 11-30-2022, 10:06 PM.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by NickG0103 View Post
                I work in a Connecticut city that's fairly busy. So if 20 calls are pending, your coworkers may not be happy. But with that being said, we are allowed to do it at any given time. We have a lot of flexibility and we aren't micromanaged like a lot of smaller departments.

                If it's a female passenger, we must state that to dispatch. You must also state your odometer reading at the start and end of the trip.

                I'll normally do it for homeless people that are trespassing in a public place that need to go to a warming shelter. Or someone involved in a car accident.

                Regarding the paranoia of transporting attractive women... that's what body cameras protect against. They protect us, as well the people we're transporting. Someone's attractiveness should have no implication on whether you can help them out and give them a ride. At the same time, we are not a taxi service. So I personally reserve it for people that have no ability to procure their own transportation.
                Attractive females that cant get their own rides are usually a problem. Take a cab ma'am.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by NickG0103 View Post
                  I work in a Connecticut city that's fairly busy. So if 20 calls are pending, your coworkers may not be happy. But with that being said, we are allowed to do it at any given time. We have a lot of flexibility and we aren't micromanaged like a lot of smaller departments.

                  If it's a female passenger, we must state that to dispatch. You must also state your odometer reading at the start and end of the trip.

                  I'll normally do it for homeless people that are trespassing in a public place that need to go to a warming shelter. Or someone involved in a car accident.

                  Regarding the paranoia of transporting attractive women... that's what body cameras protect against. They protect us, as well the people we're transporting. Someone's attractiveness should have no implication on whether you can help them out and give them a ride. At the same time, we are not a taxi service. So I personally reserve it for people that have no ability to procure their own transportation.

                  Once you decide to give someone a ride, are there any further policies that require an ID run/warrant check or even requiring handcuffs for the ride? I talked about this a while back, but when I was given a ride by an officer he said that it was policy that he was required to put me in handcuffs for the ride. I was not under arrest or being detained. I talked to a couple of people since then and a young woman said she also had to wear handcuffs when getting a ride home after her car broke down. She was a 22 year old young woman and she was transported home by a female officer. Figured I mention that since you and others have talked about transporting women. Another person I talked to said that he was required to give the officer his ID for the ride to check for warrants. Do you have any of these policies or heard of other departments having them?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by EC912 View Post


                    Once you decide to give someone a ride, are there any further policies that require an ID run/warrant check or even requiring handcuffs for the ride? I talked about this a while back, but when I was given a ride by an officer he said that it was policy that he was required to put me in handcuffs for the ride. I was not under arrest or being detained. I talked to a couple of people since then and a young woman said she also had to wear handcuffs when getting a ride home after her car broke down. She was a 22 year old young woman and she was transported home by a female officer. Figured I mention that since you and others have talked about transporting women. Another person I talked to said that he was required to give the officer his ID for the ride to check for warrants. Do you have any of these policies or heard of other departments having them?
                    Nope, we don't have to run their ID's.

                    It is department policy to conduct a pat-down for weapons. Do most officers I know actually do the pat-down? No.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by NickG0103 View Post

                      Nope, we don't have to run their ID's.

                      It is department policy to conduct a pat-down for weapons. Do most officers I know actually do the pat-down? No.
                      Rookie, you have no idea what other officers are doing, unless you're riding with them. You only know what YOU'RE doing. It sounds like YOU are not patting people down before transports.

                      Your agency's policy requiring a pat down for weapons before transport, is there for a reason. Go back and read my post above, regarding the deaths of Brett Clodfelter and his wife.

                      And even if I wasn't required to run them, I'd run them anyway. Can you imagine how stupid you'd look if you were a taxi driver for a wanted fugitive? How would it go if you gave a domestic violence fugitive a ride home and they then killed their spouse after you dropped them off?

                      You need to start using your brain.

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                      • #12
                        It all depends on the situation. For convenience? No. If not doing so would put the person at substantial risk? Probably, unless more pressing situations we're pending.

                        I worked in a region that sees some pretty epic snowfalls. Occasionally, ER staff at our hospital would ask for a lift if the roads were awful. If we were available, we would give them a lift. They typically didn't abuse the policy, and if I'm completely honest, we did it so that we fostered a good relationship with them. You don't want bad blood with ER doctors and nurses.

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                        • Bing_Oh
                          Bing_Oh commented
                          Editing a comment
                          There are a few hard-and-fast rules in LE and one of them is, never **** off the person who could potentially be putting in a catheter when you get hurt.

                      • #13
                        Originally posted by Joe2845 View Post
                        You don't want bad blood with ER doctors and nurses.
                        Amen to that

                        Comment


                        • #14
                          Originally posted by Aidokea View Post

                          Rookie, you have no idea what other officers are doing, unless you're riding with them. You only know what YOU'RE doing. It sounds like YOU are not patting people down before transports.

                          Your agency's policy requiring a pat down for weapons before transport, is there for a reason. Go back and read my post above, regarding the deaths of Brett Clodfelter and his wife.

                          And even if I wasn't required to run them, I'd run them anyway. Can you imagine how stupid you'd look if you were a taxi driver for a wanted fugitive? How would it go if you gave a domestic violence fugitive a ride home and they then killed their spouse after you dropped them off?

                          You need to start using your brain.
                          I never said I don't pat people down, please don't make assumptions.

                          What I am saying is for a lot of officers I've been on calls with, I have not seen them pat down individuals when giving them transportation. In fact, I saw it happen two days ago. If it's not my cruiser or my call, I don't tell other people what to do, especially officers senior to me.

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                          • #15
                            Yes, discretion.

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