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  • more training less cops

    so this has been stewing in my mind for a while,
    there used to be a time before the concept of a state police academy where a police officer would get hired, there wasn't even a background check, and they were given a week of defensive combat instruction, (how to arrest) (how to shoot your gun) and then there were put out on the street and everything else about the job was learned by experience, it was sink or swim and if they didn't work out they got another guy to replace him in 2 weeks
    today, i hear in particularly large departments like L.A. Chicago, and New York, that it takes 9 months to go from civilian to actually on the street on your own, 9 months for the hiring process, the academy, field training and so on.
    and that doesn't even include ongoing training, every hour that a cop gets more and more training is an hour the tax payers pay for that doesn't go to them being on the street being a cop.
    the way i'm seeing it is that police are so highly trained but there are so few of them, and that's where i'm seeing the problem these days
    more training less cops
    am i right? what do you guys think?
    thanks



  • #2
    Originally posted by How To Police View Post
    so this has been stewing in my mind for a while,
    there used to be a time before the concept of a state police academy where a police officer would get hired, there wasn't even a background check, and they were given a week of defensive combat instruction, (how to arrest) (how to shoot your gun) and then there were put out on the street and everything else about the job was learned by experience, it was sink or swim and if they didn't work out they got another guy to replace him in 2 weeks
    today, i hear in particularly large departments like L.A. Chicago, and New York, that it takes 9 months to go from civilian to actually on the street on your own, 9 months for the hiring process, the academy, field training and so on.
    and that doesn't even include ongoing training, every hour that a cop gets more and more training is an hour the tax payers pay for that doesn't go to them being on the street being a cop.
    the way i'm seeing it is that police are so highly trained but there are so few of them, and that's where i'm seeing the problem these days
    more training less cops
    am i right? what do you guys think?
    thanks


    Paragraphs. Capitalization.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by How To Police View Post
      so this has been stewing in my mind for a while,
      there used to be a time before the concept of a state police academy where a police officer would get hired, there wasn't even a background check, and they were given a week of defensive combat instruction, (how to arrest) (how to shoot your gun) and then there were put out on the street and everything else about the job was learned by experience, it was sink or swim and if they didn't work out they got another guy to replace him in 2 weeks
      today, i hear in particularly large departments like L.A. Chicago, and New York, that it takes 9 months to go from civilian to actually on the street on your own, 9 months for the hiring process, the academy, field training and so on.
      and that doesn't even include ongoing training, every hour that a cop gets more and more training is an hour the tax payers pay for that doesn't go to them being on the street being a cop.
      the way i'm seeing it is that police are so highly trained but there are so few of them, and that's where i'm seeing the problem these days
      more training less cops
      am i right? what do you guys think?
      thanks


      Paying for training is cheaper than paying for lawsuits.

      Comment


      • #4
        Every SECOND of training saves the agency money in the long run.

        6 months of Academy and 3-4 months of FTO seems like a long time, but it often takes that long to mold a person into an effective officer. There is a whole lot of information packed into a police academy. The 6 months is jam packed of learning, both physical and mental but basically is academic.

        The FTO process came about because it was found that some people can learn enough to pass tests but have huge problems putting all that learning into actual work. Therefore it pays off greatly when you put that trained officer out on the streets with a seasoned officer who can assist the rookie with learning HOW to actually do the job rather than the theory learned in school.
        My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

        Comment


        • BNWS
          BNWS commented
          Editing a comment
          Nah. Just give em a black jack and turn them loose.

      • #5
        There is not a shortage of police because of training -- there is a shortage of officers because people don't want to be the police.

        There is a reason that officers are extensively and formally trained.

        Comment


        • #6
          9 months? Lol.

          It takes a number of YEARS to hire and train an officer to the point that they are a tenured solo officer.

          It typically takes a year or more to properly vet an applicant before hiring them.

          My academy for the agency I recently retired from, was 9 months long. It was bloated with "diversity sensitivity training", training on how to be sensitive to criminals that are bat$hit crazy, cultural sensitivity training, training on how to be sensitive to criminals who self-identify as gender non-binary and are confused about which bathroom to use, Gerbil Voodoo, and all sorts of other training they give for the sole purpose of being able to later hang an officer out to dry saying "but we trained you for that".

          Then comes 4-7 months of FTO.

          Then at some point they reach the end of probation.

          And then 3-5 years of being a rookie.

          Comment


          • Joe2845
            Joe2845 commented
            Editing a comment
            Agreed. I would argue that most cops are rookies into their fifth year. Of course, everyone is is different, but I would say 5 years is the average.

            I also contend that the five year mark is where a lot of cops decide whether or not police work is something that they want as a career.

        • #7
          Originally posted by just joe View Post
          There is not a shortage of police because of training -- there is a shortage of officers because people don't want to be the police.
          Bingo. Even with $40K signing bonuses and starting wages over $100K, it is hard to hire new officers, because there are very few people walking the face of the earth that can do this job, and even fewer that want to, because of the politically motivated attacks Democrats commit against police officers.

          Comment


          • #8
            And if given the choice, pretty much all of us would prefer to run short, as opposed to working with someone unqualified or incompetent.

            Comment


            • #9
              Originally posted by Aidokea View Post

              Bingo. Even with $40K signing bonuses and starting wages over $100K, it is hard to hire new officers, because there are very few people walking the face of the earth that can do this job, and even fewer that want to, because of the politically motivated attacks Democrats commit against police officers.
              > because there are very few people walking the face of the earth that can do this job,

              it seems to me that wasn't the case in the 50s and 60s, it seems to me that getting police officers was much much easier the farther back you go

              but then again i wasn't around then, were you?

              Comment


              • #10
                Originally posted by How To Police View Post

                > because there are very few people walking the face of the earth that can do this job,

                it seems to me that wasn't the case in the 50s and 60s, it seems to me that getting police officers was much much easier the farther back you go

                but then again i wasn't around then, were you?
                How old are you? Are you on the autism spectrum?

                Yes, I was around in the '60s.

                Comment


                • #11
                  Originally posted by Aidokea View Post

                  How old are you? Are you on the autism spectrum?

                  Yes, I was around in the '60s.
                  i am 31 years old, no i am not autistic, but i would love to speak with you on voice on discord and listen to what you have to say

                  do you have discord?

                  Comment


                  • #12
                    Originally posted by Aidokea View Post
                    And if given the choice, pretty much all of us would prefer to run short, as opposed to working with someone unqualified or incompetent.
                    i don't recall ever disagreeing with that.

                    Comment


                    • #13
                      Originally posted by just joe View Post
                      There is not a shortage of police because of training -- there is a shortage of officers because people don't want to be the police.

                      There is a reason that officers are extensively and formally trained.
                      Exactly this above ^^^^^

                      Comment


                      • #14
                        Originally posted by How To Police View Post

                        > because there are very few people walking the face of the earth that can do this job,

                        it seems to me that wasn't the case in the 50s and 60s, it seems to me that getting police officers was much much easier the farther back you go

                        but then again i wasn't around then, were you?
                        Back then, it was a career field that was open to and filled by the working class, the non-college educated (which most of the population was), and veterans. It was easier to recruit people because the standards were lower. It was a stable career path that was typically respected by the population at large. While the same in some ways, it was also very different. It was more physical and less cerebral. When I was sworn in a lot of guys were military veterans, and a fair number of those were combat veterans. Police work was a natural extension of military service in some regards. Now, most of our population isn't even fit enough to serve.

                        Comment


                        • #15
                          Are you asking if we believe too much time is spent training? I'm not clear on your question.

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