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  • Interview for join police

    Hello guys, I have some doubts about my first interview.
    maybe someone could help me.
    First, I'm Italian citizen and I live fiscally in Italy but there is an agency in Colorado who is interested to me.
    I'm former carabiniere officer and my dream is become police officer in USA.
    My problem is whit language, I'm not fluently at all.
    I watched some videos with the most common questions, but I was wondering if someone could point me towards the more difficult questions and maybe teach me how to answer them correctly. For me, serving the United States would be the greatest honor that can be bestowed on me.
    Thank you all

  • #2
    Many agencies in the US don’t require citizenship, including the State Patrol, but they do require permanent residency and English fluency.

    Id suggest moving here, maybe as a student, and getting better at English…. And decide if you really want to live here. Colorado is a crappy place to be a cop right now.
    "I am a Soldier. I fight where I'm told and I win where I fight." -- GEN George S. Patton, Jr.

    "With a brother on my left and a sister on my right, we face…. We face what no one should face. We face, so no one else would face. We are in the face of Death." -- Holli Peet

    Comment


    • Paolo
      Paolo commented
      Editing a comment
      Thank you.
      the agency that contacted me knows that I have neither a green card or a work permit.

      I'm absolutely sure, I want to live There.

  • #3
    This all sounds very odd.

    How are you going to legally work in the United States without a greencard or work visa? What's the agency's plan here? They likely could not sponsor you because there's no way they can argue that you are uniquely qualified for the job.

    When and where is the interview supposed to take place? Is it done remotely via video-conferencing?

    Currently you couldn't even visit the United States. Due to Covid, travelers from most of Europe (including Italy) are still barred from entry.

    Comment


    • Paolo
      Paolo commented
      Editing a comment
      the HR manager wrote to me, explaining that my résumé and my past experiences matched what they are looking for. I specified from the beginning that I did not have a green card or a work permit, I was asked anyway if I wanted to do an interview. At that point I said yes. I'm not trying to steal anyone's job. This possibility has opened up and I would like to take it. For work it is possible to move from Italy to the United States.

    • not.in.MY.town
      not.in.MY.town commented
      Editing a comment
      Paolo. So this agency in Colorado is going to sponsor you for a work visa? Do they understand the amount of paperwork and expense that's involved in even attempting to do this? And that the likelihood of it being approved is slim to none? Why would they bother going through that process when they could just hire someone locally? I know US law enforcement is in a hiring crisis, but not to the point of having to "import" former cops from Europe...

      As far as your English is concerned, you are able to communicate well enough in writing for us to understand what you're trying to say. It's not good enough for a report. I assume your spoken/conversational English is pretty rough. You would struggle to communicate effectively with the public, and you would be unable to competently testify in court.

      I appreciate your enthusiasm...but I doubt this will ever be more than a pipedream. Why a Colorado agency would string you along is beyond me.

  • #4
    Paolo, your English is not terrible. But you do need to get better at it. I suspect that English is the most important thing for you to work on.

    You do have some advantages.

    Your time in the Carabinieri means that you have previous law enforcement e experience.

    Military service can give you hiring preference over other applicants, and I the the Carabinieri is not only the national Italian police force, it is also technically a branch of the Italian military.

    And as strange as it may sound, you have an advantage in language skills- unlike most Europeans, most Americans only speak one language (American English). You obviously speak at least two languages (English and Italian). So for example, if I encountered an Italian national who had been the victim of a crime, and that due to the stress of what they'd been through , they were more comfortable communicating in Italian, and I knew that Officer Paolo was on duty and spoke fluent Italian, I would be able to call you to come help me.

    Comment


    • #5
      Make sure that you understand our U.S. Constitution, particularly the 4th Amendment protections against unreasonable search and seizure.

      Undertand that although state laws vary from state to state, they are all similar, and they almost all line up with our U.S. Constitution.

      Understand that we are subject to federal law (nationwide), state laws, as well as county and city ordinances, all at the same time.

      If you are looking at Colorado, there is one anomaly- Colorado has "legalized" marijuana, but marijuana is still a crime under federal law.

      I normally recommend against a Criminal Justice education, but for you, it might make sense. Not for the purpose of obtaining a piece of paper, but for you to learn about things that will help you in your endeavor.

      Comment


      • #6
        It is also important for you to understand the legal justification for the use of force, whether it be mere physical force, or deadly force.

        There is a lot of liability associated with the use of force.

        For that reason, it is VERY common for oral board interviews to contain a use of force question, and it is usually a deadly force question.

        For example, you may be presented with a question where you show up to a case, and another officer is being attacked by an offender, but there is a 10 foot (3 meter) tall chain link fence in between you and them. The other officer is on the ground, disarmed, injured, and the offender is standing over him, raising a baseball bat over his head, obviously about to strike the other officer in the head with it.

        And then the oral board interviewer(s) will ask you what you would do.

        Answering this type of question badly, causes a lot of applicants to be eliminated from the hiring process.

        Comment


        • #7
          You can also expect oral boards to challenge your answers. It will not be a hostile confrontation, but they need to know that you will make a decision and stick to it, and they want to know why you decided to chose a particular decision.

          Applicants that are eliminated, often fail to make any decision, due to stress, and/or they "waffle", by changing their decision when challenged, and/or they simply make a decision that is so obviously bad, that they cannot continue in the hiring process.

          Comment


          • #8
            You can expect an oral board to ask you an integrity question.

            For example, you have a partner that is also a close friend of yours. You two stop at a police substation to use the restroom, which only has one sink, one toilet, is kept locked, and only police officers have keys. You use the restroom first. Then you exit, and your partner goes in. While he's in there, you realize that you accidentally left your cell phone inside. When he comes out, you go back inside, and you see obvious cocaine residue on the rim of the sink, where there was none before.

            And then they will ask you what you would do.

            Comment


            • #9
              You can expect them to ask you why you want to be a police officer for their agency.

              Comment


              • #10
                You can expect them to ask you to briefly tell them about you- they are interviewing lots of people, and people are interesting- they just want to know a little about you.

                So your answer might be something like "My name is Paolo. I'm 30 years old. I've been married for 8 years. We have a 6 year old daughter. I am from Italy. I have served as a law enforcement officer for six years in the Carabinieri, which is the Italian national police force, and is also technically a branch of the Italian military. For many years, I have wanted to move to Colorado because it is so beautiful here. I have enjoyed serving my community as a peace officer in Italy, and would like to continue doing that here.

                Or something like that.

                They may follow up with questions about your personal hobbies and stuff like that.

                Comment


                • #11
                  Just tell them what you wrote in your bio...

                  I'm an Italian Citizen grown-up with American movie and American heroes. My greatest wish is come in U.S.A and became a dep. Sheriff. God Bless America.
                  Who could say 'no' to that?

                  Comment


                  • Paolo
                    Paolo commented
                    Editing a comment
                    I truly believe in America's values. I cannot forget that you have saved us from fascism

                • #12
                  How did HR find you?
                  What position will you be filling that can't be filled by a current US citizen?

                  This all sounds very odd,........

                  Comment


                  • Paolo
                    Paolo commented
                    Editing a comment
                    I signed up through the Colorado.gov institutional portal up to now they had always answered me in the negative, this is the first positive answer. is a small police force in a small town of 40,000 inhabitants. On the 19th there will be the interview.

                  • not.in.MY.town
                    not.in.MY.town commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Paolo So the interview is going to be done via video? Or are you in Colorado now?
                    Either way, be sure to ask them about immigration and work authorizations.

                  • Aidokea
                    Aidokea commented
                    Editing a comment
                    I would not recommend bringing up any of those issues during your oral board interview- the only thing you should be focused on during the oral board interview, is passing the oral board interview. Immigration issues are a completely separate matter.

                    And if they bring it up, give them as optimistic an answer as you honestly can.

                • #13
                  Police forces in the U.S. are also subject to political forces, so it is important to know your audience while interviewing.

                  For example, if you are interviewing for a police department in a state that is predominantly Republican and/or southern and/or central and/or rural, then traditional Christian family values are going to be tolerated more.

                  The opposite of that, would be interviewing for a police department in a state that is predominantly Democrat and/or northern and/or coastal and/or urban, where expressing traditional Christian family values would not be tolerated as much.

                  So showing up to interview in Waco Texas with pink hair and facial piercings, would cause you to be eliminated from the hiring process.

                  And showing up to interview in Portland Oregon wearing a pin in the shape of the Christian cross, would probably also cause you to be eliminated.

                  I'm not coaching you to be a chameleon- you should be who you are.

                  And no matter where you are, you need to be fair, regardless of your own personal feelings. So if you are a Christian, you still need to be fair in dealing with people who choose to pursue things that go against your faith, and if you are a transvestite, you still need to be fair in dealing with the local pastor, for example.

                  Comment


                  • #14
                    Paolo, I would not make mention of being inspired by American movies. Movies are fiction, and we're looking to hire real people to do real jobs.

                    Many applicants are eliminated because they can't differentiate between fiction and reality.

                    Comment


                    • Paolo
                      Paolo commented
                      Editing a comment
                      You are right, thanks

                  • #15
                    Originally posted by NolaT View Post
                    How did HR find you?
                    What position will you be filling that can't be filled by a current US citizen?

                    This all sounds very odd,........
                    He's already a cop there, the equivalent of being a Special Agent for a three-letter agency here. And he's military too. I've met Carabinieri when traveling in Italy, and these guys are the real deal.

                    Have you never worked with a cop that was not a U.S. citizen? I've worked with many...

                    Comment


                    • Winter_Patriot
                      Winter_Patriot commented
                      Editing a comment
                      The Carabiniere are definitely a big deal in Italy, equivalent to any major federal investigative agency in the US. A local police department would be lucky to have him, if his language skills are solid.

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