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  • Any advice for a new EMT?

    Hey everyone. Haven't been back to this forum in awhile, but I am happy to say I am now an EMT-I! My company does both BLS and is the 911 provider for the region. My first two shifts(number 1 was today) are BLS, and just being shown by my FTO how to operate the ambulance, filling out the PCR tablet, memorizing supplies, etc. Fire, EMS, and law enforcement are all cogs in the same machine, scratching each others back and working together but also not getting in each other's way. We are taught to cut AROUND bullet/knife holes, don't smudge finger prints, basically don't contaminate a crime scene within reason. And for violent scenes, police would have to clear us before entering, and then we might be needed after a shootout and such.

    All that being said, any tips from you guys on how to best co-operate/help law enforcement when all calls? Does anyone else have EMS experience? Given my long term goal of becoming a game warden(wildlife officer here in California) I was thinking of joining my company's rescue team down the line, which does swift water rescue,medical support for SWAT, rope rescue, wilderness S/R, and similar operations. There's a national park and mountains relatively closeby, and this would definitely be in line with game warden work since I know they have similar duties.

    Anyway, to the LEOs here, how can I best co-operate/help law enforcement when on calls? Are there any other mistakes EMS members make in you experience? Does anyone else have any EMS experience?
    Last edited by Zen-Paladin; 07-04-2021, 07:30 PM.

  • #2
    When it’s a medical call, you’re in charge. Tell us what you need.

    When it’s a LE call, we’re in charge. Do what we tell you.

    When it’s a fire call, they are in charge. Sit back and eat popcorn.
    "I am a Soldier. I fight where I'm told and I win where I fight." -- GEN George S. Patton, Jr.

    "With a brother on my left and a sister on my right, we face…. We face what no one should face. We face, so no one else would face. We are in the face of Death." -- Holli Peet

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    • #3
      When it’s an Active Shooter. We will tell you what and where. Don’t argue, don’t run in, don’t do anything.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Zen-Paladin View Post
        Hey everyone. Haven't been back to this forum in awhile, but I am happy to say I am now an EMT-I! My company does both BLS and is the 911 provider for the region. My first two shifts(number 1 was today) are BLS, and just being shown by my FTO how to operate the ambulance, filling out the PCR tablet, memorizing supplies, etc. Fire, EMS, and law enforcement are all cogs in the same machine, scratching each others back and working together but also not getting in each other's way. We are taught to cut AROUND bullet/knife holes, don't smudge finger prints, basically don't contaminate a crime scene within reason. And for violent scenes, police would have to clear us before entering, and then we might be needed after a shootout and such.

        All that being said, any tips from you guys on how to best co-operate/help law enforcement when all calls? Does anyone else have EMS experience? Given my long term goal of becoming a game warden(wildlife officer here in California) I was thinking of joining my company's rescue team down the line, which does swift water rescue,medical support for SWAT, rope rescue, wilderness S/R, and similar operations. There's a national park and mountains relatively closeby, and this would definitely be in line with game warden work since I know they have similar duties.

        Anyway, to the LEOs here, how can I best co-operate/help law enforcement when on calls? Are there any other mistakes EMS members make in you experience? Does anyone else have any EMS experience?
        My younger brother was an ALS Paramedic in a bad part of town. He was once once on the news five times in five nights in a row, at five different shootings.

        Do you know the magic word (and it's purpose) yet?

        Have you learned punitive medicine?

        Have you watched "Bringing Out The Dead"?

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        • #5
           

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          • #6
            It is obviously important not to take the bus out of service for trivial stuff.

            Yet homeless urchins like to call 9-1-1 complaining of nebulous and allegedly debilitating afflictions that show up neither on an X-Ray nor in a blood test, asking for a free ride to the hospital. They do this, because the nurses at the ER give them food for free, and 9-1-1 has fewer digits to dial than the number for Domino's.

            For this reason, it is important to be able to motivate them to sign a refusal form, to keep the bus available for people who actually need it.

            That's why you need to learn how to flash a 10-gauge IV needle in front of their face while whispering "sweet nothings" in their ear. That's punitive medicine.
            Last edited by Aidokea; 07-04-2021, 09:46 PM.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by tanksoldier View Post
              When it’s a medical call, you’re in charge. Tell us what you need.

              When it’s a LE call, we’re in charge. Do what we tell you.

              When it’s a fire call, they are in charge. Sit back and eat popcorn.
              Seems about right, got a chuckle on that last one.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by CCCSD View Post
                When it’s an Active Shooter. We will tell you what and where. Don’t argue, don’t run in, don’t do anything.
                Fair enough. You have the guns and bulletproof vests all we have are polos and button ups(my company is actually gonna phase those out in favor of T-shirts, which to me give off a more ''gift shop'' vibe)

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Aidokea View Post
                  It is obviously important not to take the bus out of service for trivial stuff.

                  Yet homeless urchins like to call 9-1-1 complaining of nebulous and allegedly debilitating afflictions that show up neither on an X-Ray nor in a blood test, asking for a free ride to the hospital. They do this, because the nurses at the ER give them food for free, and 9-1-1 has fewer digits to dial than the number for Domino's.

                  For this reason, it is important to be able to motivate them to sign a refusal form, to keep the bus available for people who actually need it.

                  That's why you need to learn how to flash a 10-gauge IV needle in front of their face while whispering "sweet nothings" in their ear. That's punitive medicine.
                  I swear in the ambulance depot when I got off shift today, I saw a posting on the wall of such an urchin who constantly called 911 and sexually harassed the female EMTs and medics, smh,

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Aidokea View Post

                    My younger brother was an ALS Paramedic in a bad part of town. He was once once on the news five times in five nights in a row, at five different shootings.

                    Do you know the magic word (and it's purpose) yet?

                    Have you learned punitive medicine?

                    Have you watched "Bringing Out The Dead"?
                    No to all of these. Mind clearing that up?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Learn a really good sternal rub, one that works almost as well as Narcan. You'll be surprised how often you need to use it...

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Zen-Paladin View Post

                        No to all of these. Mind clearing that up?
                        Did you not read the rest of the thread?

                        Post #5 is the movie trailer for Bringing Out The Dead.

                        Post #6 covers punitive medicine.

                        The "magic word" is a code word that you and your partner can use. In my brother's case, the magic word was "Disneyland", but you can make it whatever you two agree on. Just don't make it a word that either of you would commonly use.

                        So if you're in the back of the bus with a combative patient, and start losing the fight, you can grab ahold of the hand rails and utter "Disneyland", to signal your partner to dynamite the brakes, catching the patient off guard and sending them slamming into the bulkhead, hopefully allowing you to gain the upper hand again.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Aidokea View Post

                          Did you not read the rest of the thread?

                          Post #5 is the movie trailer for Bringing Out The Dead.

                          Post #6 covers punitive medicine.

                          The "magic word" is a code word that you and your partner can use. In my brother's case, the magic word was "Disneyland", but you can make it whatever you two agree on. Just don't make it a word that either of you would commonly use.

                          So if you're in the back of the bus with a combative patient, and start losing the fight, you can grab ahold of the hand rails and utter "Disneyland", to signal your partner to dynamite the brakes, catching the patient off guard and sending them slamming into the bulkhead, hopefully allowing you to gain the upper hand again.
                          Sorry dude it was late. But no I don't have a password yet lol,but we'll see. I also will check out that movie with Nick Cage.

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                          • #14
                            Another technique that my brother utilized to take the fight out of them, was to tape a couple of ammonia inhalants to the ceiling where they'd be easy to reach, so that if he got in a fight in the back, he could rip one off the ceiling, and slap it onto the patient's face...
                            Last edited by Aidokea; 07-05-2021, 08:55 AM.

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                            • #15
                              He also recommended giving Narcan really fast, because most opiate overdoses instantly become combative as soon as it takes effect, but if you give it really fast, they instantly start puking, and it's really hard for them to fight while heaving their toenails out...

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