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    So I never had much opportunity to interact with law enforcement other than a couple traffic stops that ended in yes sir of course sir and no citation. They were right I knew they were right and that's what it was.

    Where and when I grew up police officers were respected and helpful. They were and are on the whole unarmed.

    I have two young children who in so far as it matters and it probably shouldn't matter are mixed race (Asian and Caucasian)

    Of course I will do my best to educate them in politeness and respect. And also steer them away from harmful activities and poor life choices.

    The media today has my head spinning and it is difficult to connect the officers I did encounter with what seems to be the common media narrative today.

    Here's my question.

    Am I advised, at the right age, to give them an education in how to interact with Police Officers should they encounter them. I am thinking of things like obey instructions, don't argue, if you have an argument save it for the court. Don't make sudden moves that may spook the officer who may be concerned for their own safety. Keep your hands in plain sight.

    What is your advice please?
    Last edited by Boisterousbob; 04-23-2021, 08:52 PM.

  • #2
    I don’t think it’s bad idea but I would assume you probably are raising your children to show respect to others, elders, and people in in position of authority. The rest will probably fall in line.
    Where'd you learn that, Cheech? Drug school?

    Comment


    • #3
      You're 50 years old and have two small children?

      Comment


      • #4
        I think it is a good idea for the parents of children of any race to explain appropriate behavior.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by JDCOP View Post
          I don’t think it’s bad idea but I would assume you probably are raising your children to show respect to others, elders, and people in in position of authority. The rest will probably fall in line.
          I agree 110%


          I don't know where you are but I assume you can find a police department near you that you could contact & go visit the agency. Now days most agencies have Public Relations officers or DARE officers who would be happy to help educate your children

          Let them meet an officer and have the officer talk to them about the ways of the road.

          Originally posted by Aidokea View Post
          You're 50 years old and have two small children?
          So what
          I am 65 and have a 15 yr old
          Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

          My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Aidokea View Post
            You're 50 years old and have two small children?

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Iowa #1603 View Post

              I am 65 and have a 15 yr old
              Excellent!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Boisterousbob View Post
                Am I advised, at the right age, to give them an education in how to interact with Police Officers should they encounter them. I am thinking of things like obey instructions, don't argue, if you have an argument save it for the court. Don't make sudden moves that may spook the officer who may be concerned for their own safety. Keep your hands in plain sight.

                What is your advice please?
                Are your children in school yet? Many schools have school resource officers and/or have officers from their local law enforcement agency come in to give a talk or do some sort of presentation to educate kids on how to interact with the police. They are usually tailored to various age groups. Driver's ed classes these days also typically include a lesson on how to conduct yourself on a traffic stop.

                This is not to discourage you from having these talks with your children, but for now, teaching them basic manners/respect/following rules etc. is probably all you need to be worrying about. The last thing you want to do is instill fear of law enforcement in them.


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                • #9
                  Every department is different overall, and every officer in those departments is different. Those officers are even different on different days. Officers are people like you and me from the community. We aren't space aliens so you just teach them to be respectful to everyone, but to add truthfulness while dealing with officers. Officers know that if your lips are moving, you are lying so they take a lot of what is said to them with a grain of salt...all the way up to a full shaker.

                  Great advice above, but don't just talk to DARE officers or other kindergarten cops, talk to patrol officers out in the filed. If they are eating at a restaurant, don't bother them while eating with questions, but there is no harm in a friendly greeting. Have some questions ready, and those can range from wanting to know why they got into that line of work to how their family members feel of their career choice, etc. Just be ready, because you might run into a talker.

                  Ultimately, if no desire to pursue a LE career yourself, go through a citizens academy if you have the time, and absolutely go on a ride along.

                  I can't stress this enough, but officers are regular people from the community. They regularly deal with the ills of society and other problems that people don't or can't deal with on their own. They see people at their worst and at their best.

                  Lastly, do what you can for you and your children to look past the uniforms worn to see the human inside. They are daddies, brothers, husbands, sons, daughters, girlfriends, aunts, etc, etc, etc. And on top of all of what I have here and what others give you here, please attempt to discern the truth that may be hidden in the leftist narratives put forth by the media. EVERYTHING reported is now is agenda-driven!!!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    As a retired (10+ years) Canadian (please, hold your applause) Police Officer (35+ years) who ALWAYS told EVERY civilian, particularly kids, to call me by my first name, who EVERYONE in my area (until I was on "the dark side" - HP / Traffic Services) knew where I lived and who my family was, father of 5, including one who is also a Police Officer (14+ years - yeah, I tried to tell him, but he would NOT listen) in my Force, I say: you simply be an example to your child of being respectful of EVERYONE, and help them to be a good citizen.

                    ALL people, no matter their gender (obvious / assigned at birth, identify as, non-binary, or indeterminate), skin hue, higher-power-belief (or not), ancestral background, intimate-relationship-partner(s) choice, domicile location, employment status, or economic-strata, have the free-will choice to be good or evil. Professional Police and other Peace and other Law Enforcement Officers (PO) must ALWAYS f-w choose to do good in order to help civilians, in the USA at least, to achieve life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

                    All any client EVER has to do, AFTER f-w choosing evil and committing a violation, of ANY type, to AVOID being hurt by a PO, is simply surrender to the FIRST PO they encounter, and use the Justice system to address whatever the issue is. It is the CLIENT who is responsible thereafter for any injury and loss.

                    If a client IS dealt with by a "cop" who f-w chooses to commit violations with a badge, then the client AND EVERY PO must do EVERYTHING they can to identify the "cop" and get them properly dealt with.
                    #32936 - Royal Canadian Mounted Police - 1975-10-27 / 2010-12-29
                    Proud Dad of #54266 - RCMP - 2007-02-12 to date
                    RCMP Veterans Association - Regina Division member
                    Mounted Police Professional Association of Canada - Associate (Retired) member
                    "Smile" - no!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      As the original poster just wanted to say thanks for all the great advice and the suggestions of people to talk to.

                      To the question of am I 50 with young children the answer is yes two daughters 4 and 6. I don't think it's THAT uncommon any more. It has some advantages like we're already a bit more secure in life (plus we're already getting free computer lessons from them!), and some disadvantages such as I think my back will hurt forever

                      Anyway thanks again appreciate the help.
                      Last edited by Boisterousbob; 04-25-2021, 05:08 PM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Boisterousbob View Post
                        To the question of am I 50 with young children the answer is yes two daughters 4 and 6. I don't think it's THAT uncommon any more. It has some advantages like we're already a bit more secure in life (plus we're already getting free computer lessons from them!), and some disadvantages such as I think my back will hurt forever
                        Congratulations.

                        Yes, it's not uncommon at all, especially for those of us that married much younger girls...

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Depends where you live and what the default sentiment is about law enforcement. Where I live, I'd tell my kids to be compliant, respectful, and not to give an officer any reason to become suspicious or escalate. If someone thinks their rights are being violated, court is the right place to allege that. So many parents and kids I know have a negative view of law enforcement and are self-righteous about any interaction, no matter how minor. Even though I might not raise my kids that way, I'd be worried about their teachers and other parents indoctrinating them.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Winter_Patriot View Post
                            Depends where you live and what the default sentiment is about law enforcement. Where I live, I'd tell my kids to be compliant, respectful, and not to give an officer any reason to become suspicious or escalate. If someone thinks their rights are being violated, court is the right place to allege that. So many parents and kids I know have a negative view of law enforcement and are self-righteous about any interaction, no matter how minor. Even though I might not raise my kids that way, I'd be worried about their teachers and other parents indoctrinating them.
                            Thank you. Actually for me this gets right to the heart. I don't want my kids getting overly self-righteous. Very few things are civil rights issues. Certainly not if you just made an illegal turn.

                            I think the prior advice on teach them respect generally and the rest will fall in line is spot on.

                            Listen to your teacher about schoolwork. Do your homework.

                            Listen to the police officer about infractions. Don't escalate.

                            Perhaps this all sounds very obvious but just getting feedback here was very helpful.
                            Last edited by Boisterousbob; 04-29-2021, 10:12 PM.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              The biggest thing is tell them to do what an officer tells them to do.

                              Even if you think he has the wrong guy, even if it’s all a mistake... follow instructions now, sort it out later.

                              The officer thinks you’re somebody he needs to detain... and he WILL detain you one way or another.
                              "I am a Soldier. I fight where I'm told and I win where I fight." -- GEN George S. Patton, Jr.

                              "With a brother on my left and a sister on my right, we face…. We face what no one should face. We face, so no one else would face. We are in the face of Death." -- Holli Peet

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