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Can LEOs...go on ride alongs?

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  • Can LEOs...go on ride alongs?

    Random question. So usually it's young adults that want to become police officers that go on ride alongs. But for instance. What if a state trooper, had a friend or relative that was a city cop, and wanted to see how life as city cop is, so his friend gets him on a ride along with him. Would the state trooper's command let him? Would the city department let him? What were to happen if the city cop was being attacked, could the state trooper who is off duty, exercise his police powers? Especially since he has the whole state as jurisdiction, or does he have to stand by and wait for backup. (Other city police m officer.

  • #2
    The short answer, in my experience, is 'yes'.

    Examples:
    • If someone who is already an officer applies to another department, the officer may request or the department may require a ride-along. It helps give both sides a feel as to whether they're a good fit for each other. From my experience, the officer riding along is not allowed to be armed and signs an agreement that they will not take any actions unless ordered by the host officer. When I've been the host in these situations, I told my ride-alongs that, if they see me getting my *** kicked, they can consider that my order to assist.
    • Officers traveling to other parts of the country or even other countries may want to see how the job is done elsewhere. I know several officers that have done this, and enjoyed the experience. For the host agencies, it can serve as a recruiting tool. I believe Las Vegas Metro PD is very open to officer ride-alongs, for this very reason.
    • Friends and family. I have a family member that's a cop and I have done a ride-along with him. He's done the same with me. Just for funsies. Neither of us were allowed to be armed when we were the ride-along, but we both started the shift by showing the other how to release the squad rifle and shotgun.
    I did have one ride-along experience, as an officer, that differed from any of those listed above. I knew an officer that was part of a larger-city's specialty crime unit. The officer invited me for a ride-along, and I accepted. She suggested I come armed, but in plain clothes. At one point in the night, she had me post up outside a building she and other officers were searching. Know now what I do about that department, I'm confident this broke many, many policies. But, as they say, what happens on midnights, stays on midnights.

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    • Gerald2121
      Gerald2121 commented
      Editing a comment
      This is a great explanation!

  • #3
    Yup. Some things that the bosses don't know doesn't hurt them!

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    • #4
      I've a friend I've known for 20 years who happens to be a local in the city I live in now. I have ridden with him several times because that's how we catch up sometimes as he has a pretty rough schedule to work into. He prefers midnights and doesn't live around here anymore. When he is on he stays at his brother's house or his parents but on his off days he is hours away in the sierra foothills. I've ridden with him doing normal patrol, doing unmarked stuff and when he was a K-9 officer.

      Since I moved to the city he works in I haven't ridden with him, though we were planning one about a year ago and then covid happened. Not sure if the city would care if I was armed or not. But my friend always showed me how to get to his long guns and how to release the Kraken when he had the puppy.

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      • #5
        Many places even private citizens aren’t required to disarm.

        The Sheriff where I started allowed ride along civilians to be armed.

        They signed a waiver that the weapon would remain concealed, and they would take no action unless ordered by their deputy or to protect themselves.

        There was a fake 911/ ambush a while back where the rider was an officer from another agency. The on duty officer was taken out by the ambush and the rider was injured, but they were the ones who took out the ambusher.
        "I am a Soldier. I fight where I'm told and I win where I fight." -- GEN George S. Patton, Jr.

        "With a brother on my left and a sister on my right, we face…. We face what no one should face. We face, so no one else would face. We are in the face of Death." -- Holli Peet

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        • #6
          If you are a cop, and you rode with another cop, and you do ANYTHING related to LE, you have to write a report and are now part of the process, meaning you can be subpoenaed, etc. It’s not, “ I got it, don’t worry bro”.

          Make SURE your agency allows it, and theirs.

          BTDT.
          Now go home and get your shine box!

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          • #7
            Yes, I had a friend in CHP, that I rode with when visiting him in CA. He rode with me when he came to NY. We were both in Highway Patrol. Our respective bosses had no issues with it.
            Hey Kidd, I've got more time On Meal than you have "On the Job"

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            • #8
              As long as both agencies allow it.

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              • #9
                I went on a few with buddies who worked for other outfits during my run. It was interesting to see how other agencies did things, like how my trooper buddy would bungie cord his long guns behind his seat (his department didn't buy gun locks).

                Now that I'm retired, you couldn't pay me to go on a ride along. I just want to live in peace and be left alone.

                I've become one of *those guys*.
                Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat 2000 of something.

                -Mitch Hedberg

                Comment


                • Ratatatat
                  Ratatatat commented
                  Editing a comment
                  I can't even watch cop shows on tv anymore.

                • Wentwestco
                  Wentwestco commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Old old MSP!

                • Ratatatat
                  Ratatatat commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Lol. Yep. Bungied to the back of the headrest.

              • #10
                Originally posted by Gerald2121 View Post
                Random question. So usually it's young adults that want to become police officers that go on ride alongs. But for instance. What if a state trooper, had a friend or relative that was a city cop, and wanted to see how life as city cop is, so his friend gets him on a ride along with him. Would the state trooper's command let him? Would the city department let him? What were to happen if the city cop was being attacked, could the state trooper who is off duty, exercise his police powers? Especially since he has the whole state as jurisdiction, or does he have to stand by and wait for backup. (Other city police m officer.
                Yes, officers may go on ride alongs with officers in other jurisdictions. Most of the ride alongs I have been on have been after I commissioned. As others have mentioned above, I have gone on a ride along with a family member in a different state, other areas of the country to see how different agencies do things, and with our state police to gain some insight into a particular law enforcement niche. I have been armed on most of the ride alongs I have been on (sometimes concealed, sometimes open carry with badge depending on the agency's preference), and have made myself useful.

                Keep in mind your idea of jurisdiction seems flawed. Even though I work for a city, doesn't mean I have any less law enforcement authority anywhere else in the state. This may vary from state to state. Even then, if an officer is being attacked, even as a private citizen, you are still legally able to assist. I'm telling you right now there is no way I would "stand by" and watch another officer be attacked. I can tell you that because I have been in a use of force while on a ride along when I was in the hiring process with my first department.
                "Respect is earned. Honesty is appreciated. Trust is gained. Loyalty is returned."

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                • #11
                  I've only tried to ride with another agency once as a LEO. Got the impression I wasn't welcomed there and got the run around. I still hate having to contact that agency for anything.

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                  • #12
                    No cop would be discouraged from a ride along with my agency. They also would be EXPECTED to be armed.
                    Last edited by Iowa #1603; 01-20-2021, 09:11 AM.
                    Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

                    My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

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                    • #13
                      Officially, our policy is ride alongs must be unarmed. Unofficially, it really only applies to the random citizens who come in the lobby and fill out the paperwork requesting to do a ride along. Officer’s good friends, family members, civilian employees of the department who want to ride out, and yes, other LEOs, are generally ok to be armed if the officer they’re riding with doesn’t care.

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                      • #14
                        Originally posted by westside popo View Post
                        I've only tried to ride with another agency once as a LEO. Got the impression I wasn't welcomed there and got the run around. I still hate having to contact that agency for anything.
                        From what I've seen on both sides of the ride-along is that the rider's experience has way more to do with the host than the department and/or any policies they may have regarding ride-alongs.

                        Both before and after becoming an officer, I did ride-alongs with hosts who were very obviously not pleased that I was in the vehicle with them. They were pretty non-communicative and mostly gave yes-no answers when asked questions. As an officer, I've been in briefings where ride-along assignments were issued, and watched the assigned hosts roll their eyes and make disparaging comments about the rider before even meeting them. I felt sorry for the rider who was going to be stuck with that officer for the next several hours.

                        Thankfully, most of my riding experiences have been the exact opposite -- where the officer was engaging and willing to answer questions. As a ride-along host (and I use that term purposefully), I strive to make my guest (ditto) welcome in my squad, and show appreciation for their interest in our organization. I'm happy and lucky that almost all of my riders have been enjoyable. The lone exception was the daughter of a friend who very quickly proved herself to be more interested in being on CSI: Miami than have any true interest in real-life police work.

                        And occasionally, you can make a difference or change a mind. For example, there's a law school in our area that requires students to do a police ride-along as part of their curriculum. It's not uncommon for some of those students to show up with their social-justice-warrior flag flying, and make it clear they're only there because they have to be. I had one of those one night; things started off rocky, but we warmed to each other after a little while. It just so happened we had a domestic call that night, and my guest got to see first hand how we supported the victim. At the end of it, she admitted the way my partners and I treated the victim -- and the suspect -- had opened her eyes to some of the realities of the job...and maybe we weren't ALL jack-booted thugs.

                        Comment


                        • #15
                          I've been on a couple of ride a longs with friends I'm visiting in different cities. Both times were with cops working things that i definitely do not do on a daily basis as a beat cop(a boat unit officer, an air officer and a K9). It's cool seeing how different area's are and it's fun seeing your buddies work.

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