Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Can I contact my background investigator?

Collapse

300x250 Mobile

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Can I contact my background investigator?

    Hello everyone. First off Merry Christmas and hope everyone is enjoying their holidays. I am currently in the second to last stage of the process of being hired by a department for a civilian position to get my foot in the door after trying for 2-3 years. The stage I am currently in is the background check. Tomorrow will be exactly 2 months since the background check started. It's not that I am impatient, but more so curious/a little anxious about the process. While there is nothing in my background that would disqualify me, I can't help but feel nervous. I know these things can take sometime especially with COVID going on but I am curious if it would be ok to call the BI and ask how it was going unless that is a big no no of course. I have spoken to the BI 4-5 times since the whole process started but I haven't spoken to the her since she asked for some old W-2s to verify employment and that was 3 weeks ago. Any informations/advice about how the whole background process works would be deeply appreciated.

  • #2
    So your last contact was 3 weeks ago to verify employment? You're way too impatient. Obviously they haven't forgotten about you. With Thanksgiving, now Christmas, and Covid all things are taking a long time. It could also be the dept isn't ready to hire just yet. There are always fiscal concerns with any hiring. Also welcome to the real world of employment. Every place operates on their schedule, not yours. If you're going into LE then get use to delays. It's going to happen.
    Relax. They'll eventually get around to notifying you, either with a start date or a go away letter.
    183 FBINA

    Comment


    • sc0006
      sc0006 commented
      Editing a comment
      It will be nearly a year since I interviewed for the position and was on the waiting list for 9 month before they contacted me saying they were ready to move forward. So trust me Im patient. Just nervous is all. I forgot to consider that with the holiday season things must be harder for them to do their job thus it might take longer. Thank you because I do appreciate the input!

  • #3
    As a former BI that worked in the Federal area, DO NOT CALL YOUR BI CONTINUOUSLY ASKING FOR UPDATES. The only thing the BI has control over is whether they submit their reports in a timely fashion, provided they get all the needed information without interruption. You're dealing with a holiday season, I can tell you from experience this time of year was the most difficult time to get any sort of background work done, because employers shut down (especially government) and would be near impossible to meet with people.

    Comment


    • sc0006
      sc0006 commented
      Editing a comment
      You're right. Like I said on the other persons post I forgot to take into consideration how the holiday season makes it harder for them to do their jobs. Im just really nervous/anxious in the hoping that I get this job is all. I won't call her and ask. Its been nearly a year since I interviewed for the position and was on the waiting list for a very long time before they even called me to get to this part in the process. All I can do is wait and be patient as you suggested despite how nerve wracking it can be.

  • #4
    Here's some things to consider -

    Government agencies are budged for a specific number of positions. You can't hire someone until an existing position comes vacant. Even then, you usually have to hire in the order of civil service test scores (highest first, next highest second, etc.) so the fact that you tested a year ago is meaningless. Unless they have enough vacancies and your test score is high enough, this can be a very slow process, or your name may sit there on the list forever and they may never get to you. That fact that you were reachable within 12 months is not unreasonable.

    Next, the BI has nothing to do with you actually being hired. They will do your background and submit it. Someone higher up the food chain will approve or disapprove and it will then move to personnel. If approved, personnel must then send you for a physical and if you pass that, they will figure out an appointment date.

    Now, when will that be? Let's say the person you are replacing has already retired after a long career. That doesn't mean you will be hired right away. Now doubt they accumulated many hours of vacation, sick leave and compensatory time off that now has to be paid in lump sum upon separation. (I had nine months of leave credit when I retired.) There is no special fund for doing that, so they will continue to hold that person's position vacant and use the money that would pay their salary until all the leave credit is paid off.

    On top of that and as others have said, it is the holiday season where everything grinds to a halt in government. People take vacation, work half days and nothing will get back to full speed until around January 15th.

    In short, getting a job in government is not like getting a job at the local grocery store or gas station. We have lots of hoops to jump through and mush red tape. The mantra you will quickly learn is Hurry Up And Wait.



    Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

    Comment


    • sc0006
      sc0006 commented
      Editing a comment
      I didn't know the part about the the leave credit. Hurry up and wait does seem to be the name of the game. Hopefully i can move forward so I can finally get my foot in the door. I really do appreciate your insight. It makes a lot more sense why agencies I applied to a few months ago haven't even gotten to me yet. I won't deny that this process is incredibly frustrating but that's just how the game is played from what I can tell. Thank you for the information. It did put me at ease knowing this wait is more so just how the entire process works. Hopefully I find out soon but until than I will just be continue to be patient and help the BI with anything else she needs. I also think it just felt weird not hearing from her in 3 weeks after being in contact at least once a week over the course of the first month. I imagine again things might be at a stand still simply because of the holidays as you and the other mentioned!

  • #5
    The leave credit thing has always bothered me as well. I've always believed they should keep track of leave credit balances and include money in the budget to pay them off when someone separates, but saying that is easier than it sounds when you you try to think it out in practical terms.

    Contrary to many applicant's assumptions, contact with a BI is usually limited. When you submit your personal history statement they should meet with you to go over it. They may contact you during the investigation if they need further information and at the end, there may an additional meeting for what's called a discrepancy interview, where they clear up information they've developed during their investigation that conflicts with what you provided.

    Other than that, there is no need for them to communicate with you. While many applicants believe it is the BI's obligation to keep them updated (deal with the applicant's anxiety and provide reassurance) it really isn't. BIs aren't going to discuss their findings because applicants often want to argue the merits of background standards or the meaning of certain conduct and BIs don't have the time duty to engage in such discussions.

    The BI's job is simple. Verify your identity, confirm that you possess the minimum qualifications for the job. Determine whether there is anything in your personal history that meets the department's criteria for disqualification. It's all pretty cut and dry.

    Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

    Comment


    • #6
      Originally posted by L-1 View Post
      The leave credit thing has always bothered me as well. I've always believed they should keep track of leave credit balances and include money in the budget to pay them off when someone separates, but saying that is easier than it sounds when you you try to think it out in practical terms.

      Contrary to many applicant's assumptions, contact with a BI is usually limited. When you submit your personal history statement they should meet with you to go over it. They may contact you during the investigation if they need further information and at the end, there may an additional meeting for what's called a discrepancy interview, where they clear up information they've developed during their investigation that conflicts with what you provided.

      Other than that, there is no need for them to communicate with you. While many applicants believe it is the BI's obligation to keep them updated (deal with the applicant's anxiety and provide reassurance) it really isn't. BIs aren't going to discuss their findings because applicants often want to argue the merits of background standards or the meaning of certain conduct and BIs don't have the time duty to engage in such discussions.

      The BI's job is simple. Verify your identity, confirm that you possess the minimum qualifications for the job. Determine whether there is anything in your personal history that meets the department's criteria for disqualification. It's all pretty cut and dry.
      Fair point. She has only contacted me for clarifications. Phone number of first boss, old W2 forms to verify employment at certain places and a few other questions she had. I didn't meet with her in person but I'm guessing that's because of COVID. As for my background there is nothing I can think of that would disqualify me. Stable work history (and none of my ex bosses would ever have anything bad to say about me), never gotten a ticket in my 10 years of driving, no arrests, when I still did use social media I never posted anything dumb on there, decent credit, been completely honest/consistent on all of my applications, and the civilian position I am applying for only requires a high school diploma and I have a Bachelors so I imagine that gives me a little edge over some of the competition. 3 of my references are people who work for the department since I was volunteer there as a teenager and worked in the police explorers programs as a kid. Like you said though, I can only hurry up and wait and hope that all goes well.

      Comment


      • #7
        Originally posted by sc0006 View Post

        .......so I imagine that gives me a little edge over some of the competition........
        Understand that there is no scoring in the background. It is pass/fail.

        Your identity is either verifiable or it is not.

        You either possess the minimum qualifications for the position or you do not.

        There is either something in your personal history that meets the criteria for DQ or there is not.

        The time for gaining an edge on the other applicants was in the exam process. Highest score gets picked first, next highest score gets picked next. They are processing you, so you got your edge over whoever scored lower than you. That's all done now.

        Again, this is not like getting hired st Starbucks or the grocery score. We go on tests, which are supposed to measure you ability to actually perform the duties of the position you are seeking. Anything else is like putting lipstick on a pig.
        Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

        Comment


        • sc0006
          sc0006 commented
          Editing a comment
          Oh ok. Thank you for the clarification. Testing here in Florida changed the moment I took them. They don't show the scores of the tests for the CJBAT which is what we have to take. If you get a 70% or higher you just get a pass and if you a 69% lower you fail. You and the agencies you apply too don't get the scores at all. Really ****ed me off when I found out because I spent months studying try to get the highest score I could only to find out it wouldn't matter as long as I got a 70% which I could have done without studying. When it came to the application process it might have given me an edge but here at this point it doesn't. I forgot that. All that matters is that there is nothing in my background that would disqualify me (which to my knowledge there is literally nothing I can think of. I also work for county I live in for the school system and have had a background check done before. Granted not to this extent though) and that I posses the qualifications for the position which I do. So as you said before all I can do is just be patient and wait. I really do appreciate all of your input L-1 it really has put me at ease.

      • #8
        Originally posted by sc0006 View Post

        Fair point. She has only contacted me for clarifications. Phone number of first boss, old W2 forms to verify employment at certain places and a few other questions she had. I didn't meet with her in person but I'm guessing that's because of COVID. As for my background there is nothing I can think of that would disqualify me. Stable work history (and none of my ex bosses would ever have anything bad to say about me), never gotten a ticket in my 10 years of driving, no arrests, when I still did use social media I never posted anything dumb on there, decent credit, been completely honest/consistent on all of my applications, and the civilian position I am applying for only requires a high school diploma and I have a Bachelors so I imagine that gives me a little edge over some of the competition. 3 of my references are people who work for the department since I was volunteer there as a teenager and worked in the police explorers programs as a kid. Like you said though, I can only hurry up and wait and hope that all goes well.
        You may be fully qualified. You could have a squeaky clean record. But none of that means you'll be the one hired. Getting hired is not meeting qualifications. It's a competitive process. How do you compare to others who applied. What do the others bring to the table? As qualified as you think you are doesn't mean you'll be hired. There are a lot of highly qualified people out there with a lot more to offer than just having a BA and no criminal arrests. Degrees are pretty routine. A BA, no arrests, and references when you were a teenager are not particularly outstanding. Organizations and particularly public organizations are looking for people who bring a lot to the table. Prior military? Long history of successful work record? Supervisory experience? Just getting a degree and not getting arrested are pretty common, routine applicants that don't stand out from the masses.
        This is simply just the facts of life. You have to have a package that's more than just the same as the average college graduate. If you want hired you have to stand out from the pile of applicants.
        183 FBINA

        Comment


        • Aidokea
          Aidokea commented
          Editing a comment
          You left out the importance of an applicant's perceived ability to satisfy agency diversity goals, Cap.

          Being a minority, female, and/or choosing alternative sexual preferences, carry a lot of weight, even more than a clean history and an applicant's objectively quantifiable ability to do the job in a lot of cases.

        • tanksoldier
          tanksoldier commented
          Editing a comment
          Being best qualified to perform the essential functions of the job is the least important factor these days. Sometimes being unable to perform the tasks is overlooked if you identify as a minority transgender alpaca.

      MR300x250 Tablet

      Collapse

      What's Going On

      Collapse

      There are currently 6848 users online. 351 members and 6497 guests.

      Most users ever online was 158,966 at 05:57 AM on 01-16-2021.

      Welcome Ad

      Collapse
      Working...
      X