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The most outrageous police resignation you have seen

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  • The most outrageous police resignation you have seen

    What are some you have witnessed? Anyone go right to the Chief and throw their gear down and walk out? Anyone ever make a big scene? etc?

  • #2
    Sadly I seem to have tales of the sordid from my career.

    We had a young probationer who got in a really bad crash while rolling to a call. Not only did he totally demolish his patrol car, but he left a pile of wreckage so long and so horrible along the freeway at rush hour as to create a huge outpouring of public sympathy for my agency from passersby who were backed up for miles because of his crash.

    The kid sustained severe ortho injuries that kept him off work for a long period of time and which resulted in his becoming addicted to pain killers. The state's doctors were a bunch of quacks who were hired because of their ability to minimize the most serious of injuries. They certified the officer as fit for duty when he was far from ready and on his first day back (which was a national holiday), it was clear he was very much under the influence of a controlled substance. Before he could even go into roll call, one of the sergeants pulled him out, said it was clear he was under the influence, told him to change back into civvies and that a drug evaluation would be conducted. The officer changed, sat and waited while the captain came in from home to witness the evaluation.

    Now, this captain was a real Adam Henry. He was arrogant, rude, open about any bias he might have and never hid the fact if he didn't like you. Above all, he suffered from contempt of cop syndrome and if you challenged him or his authority in any way, he came unglued.

    Coming from home, the captain had a long way to drive and the rookie got tired of waiting, so he got up and started walking towards the front door of the station. A couple of sergeants directed him to stop and come back, so he picked up the pace and the next thing you knew, he was out the front door. As he ran across the front parking lot, the captain was just pulling in and he jumped across the hood of of his car with half a dozen officers in pursuit.

    The chase went for approximately six blocks. My captain turned his car around and followed, cutting the rookie off. In a classic move seen many times in the cinema, the rookie went into a half crouch, bent both arms, using both fists gave the captain the double bird and shouted the famous words, "F* Y*. He then ran off into a shopping center parking lot.

    At a loss for words, the captain directed that the chase be discontinued. But, his authority had been challenged and his ego bruised beyond forgiveness. The stage was set.

    Several days later the officer called his sergeant and said he would be in later that day to resign and clean out his locker. Rather than accept victory graciously, the captain moved that locker into his office and informed the officer he would have to search it as the officer emptied it, to ensure all department property was returned. I was there at the time. The captain slowly and painstakingly went through every item in the locker, checking pockets, envelopes and everything else, all the time needling the officer and being rude, clearly trying to provoke him into taking a swing. Not taking the bait and not wanting to risk losing his temper, the officer calmly said, "I don't have to take this s*it," and calmly walked out of the captain's office, abandoning all of his property, never to be seen again.

    Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

    Comment


    • #3
      I don't know that I would typify this as a real resignation; you decide.

      An officer joined a department I worked for after spending a short time at another agency. Training officers waved some orangish-red flags, but the uppers pushed them through. Possibly a result of concerns expressed through training, the officer was given what was considered a pretty easy beat, doing OK but not great.

      After a while, the brass decided the officer had gained enough experience to handle a more challenging area. It was at this point the officer began openly talking with co-workers about not wanting to do the job any more. But all new hires sign a contract stipulating they have to pay back training & equipment costs if they leave within a certain time period. The officer couldn't afford the payback.

      The officer discovered that, if you were fired, you didn't have to pay back the money. And thus, they started actively trying to get fired. The successful gambit included notifying supervisors to call the officer's personal cell phone if they didn't answer the radio. This was because the officer would go find a spot to sleep for several hours on shift.

      Comment


      • #4
        Had an officer quit because they couldn't fish every Saturday. He was told he couldn't take off for a fishing tournament and resigned the next day. His reasoning was he was a long time city employee (he worked for city maintenance) for a few years before getting hired by us.
        1*

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        • just joe
          just joe commented
          Editing a comment
          We had a young officer quit because they wouldn't accept an assignment to midnights.

      • #5
        vdfnco's reply triggered another memory.

        A nearby state LE agency hired a new recruit who was a state employee for many years before hire (office worker). The recruit made it all the way through the academy and several months of training without significant problems.

        Once training was complete and he was OK'd for being on his own, he was assigned to a night shift. He showed up for his first assigned solo shift with all his uniforms & gear in a bag. He handed it all to the on-duty supervisor and quit. He had figured (incorrectly) that his prior years of state service would count toward his department seniority, which would get him a spot on day shift. When that didn't happen, he decided he didn't want to work nights, weekends, and holidays.

        I can't understand how anyone can get that far into the job without understanding the nature of police work.

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        • #6
          We hired one young lady who clearly had no idea what she was getting in to. She made it through her first two days of training, and then never came back. No call, no letter, no nothing ... just didn't show up.

          Comment


          • #7
            When I went to the academy 50 years ago (yes 50), state agencies were just starting to adhere to POST standards and my department began providing POST training for multiple state agencies. My class was comprised of officers from not only my own department, but others from the Department of Motor Vehicles, State Park Rangers, Mental Hospital Police and Food & Agriculture Investigators, to name a few.

            On the first day, the very first thing they did was swear in the new hires by having them taking the oath of office and swear to the peace officer code of ethics. For those of you who have forgotten, the code of ethics talk about protecting the weak, keeping your life unsullied, never letting personal feelings influence your official decisions, recognizing your badge as symbol of public faith, etc. Apparently having to swear to such a code of ethics was asking to much of the Food & Agriculture new hires as upon hearing the content of what they were swearing to, every one of them walked out of the class, never to be seen again.

            Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

            Comment


            • #8
              I can't think of any outrageous police resignations but if they keep nitpicking and finding fault with everything I do at work..... I might have one to report.

              Tired of the constant BS lately!

              Bad thing about quitting is the job market lately.

              Comment


              • #9
                We did have a few that we wished had resigned early (sigh....)

                One guy walked through the office waving his middle finger at everyone, taking extra effort with the bosses. This was on a Friday afternoon, and he informed one and all that he was going to a different Federal agency Monday AM.
                Monday PM, he was in with THE boss, saying perhaps he had made a mistake, and could he come back....????
                The boss said, I'm sorry, your position is already filled!
                (He told us he would have taken him back, had he not insulted everyone.)
                Last edited by Sleuth; 11-19-2020, 03:47 PM.
                "A man who has nothing which he cares about more than he does about his personal safety is a miserable creature who has no chance of being free, unless made and kept so by the existing of better men than himself."
                John Stuart Mill

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                • #10
                  Not exactly a resignation and not something I personally witnessed, but a story my father told me I though was worth mentioning.

                  My dad started with his department in 1946. Back then they had an unusual ceremony for retirees.

                  The entire shift would stand in formation in the police station parking lot. The retiree would stand in front of everyone while he would be ceremonially stripped of his badge, cap piece and buttons. He would the turn his back on his fellow officers, walk away and leave forever, in what was left of his uniform.

                  After being stripped of everything, this particular old timer walked halfway across the parking lot and did an about face looking back at his buddies. He then reached in his back pocket, pulled out a bottle of booze and took a deep swig. After putting the bottle back in his pocket, he placed the thumbs of both hands in his ears and waved his fingers at the troops. Satisfied he’d said a proper goodbye, he did an about face and walked away.

                  Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

                  Comment


                  • #11
                    I always hear other officers say that when they quit, they are going to do something outrageous, but I have yet to see it.
                    John 15:13 - Greater love has no one than this, that he lay down his life for his friends.

                    Comment


                    • #12
                      Originally posted by NC Marine View Post
                      I always hear other officers say that when they quit, they are going to do something outrageous, but I have yet to see it.
                      Hey Sarge, the patrol car is in my driveway with my gun and badge under the seat. Come get it before I call a wrecker.

                      Comment


                      • #13
                        Originally posted by Sleuth View Post
                        We did have a few that we wished had resigned early (sigh....)

                        One guy walked through the office waving his middle finger at everyone, taking extra effort with the bosses. This was on a Friday afternoon, and he informed one and all that he was going to a different Federal agency Monday AM.
                        Monday PM, he was in with THE boss, saying perhaps he had made a mistake, and could he come back....????
                        The boss said, I'm sorry, your position is already filled!
                        (He told us he would have taken him back, had he not insulted everyone.)
                        We had a guy do almost the same thing. Three months later when he was a probationary release he was looking to get his job back. Sorry, we're not hiring right now.

                        Comment


                        • #14
                          As i think about it, events keep coming back to me.

                          Captains in my agency are usually station commanders. Their responsibilities are such that they are often out of the office for meetings, community events, and sometimes just screwing off, so it's not unusual for a captain to disappear for days at a time and no one thinks twice about it.

                          As a side issue, in my agency we eat our own. If someone (any rank - even a captain) gets on the bad side of the powers that be, you are shunned, ostracized, ignored and treated like a redheaded step child. This story is about one of those captains.

                          When one retires in California state service, all one needs to do is fill out the necessary paperwork and file it with CalPERS, the state retirement system, which is completely separate from your employing agency. The retirement then becomes effective on whatever future date you designate. It is considered common courtesy to give your employer a head's up that you are leaving, but there is no requirement to do so.

                          Having been screwed over one too many times by his bosses, this captain filled out his retirement papers setting a date in the close future, flied them with CalPERS and then began gradually moving personal items out of his office and taking them home. He never notified the agency of his pending retirement. At the end of his last day at work, he left all of his issued state property in his desk, walked out of his office and closed the door. He then drove his state issued, unmarked take home car to the department office closest to his home and left the keys at the motor pool. His wife, who was waiting, then drove him home.

                          About two weeks went by before anyone in Division Headquarters noticed they'd had no contact with him. The called his office and spoke to the lieutenants who denied any knowledge of his status/ The co0mmented that captains come and go as they please but noted they hadn't seen his take home car in weeks.

                          After another week with no contact, the deputy chief in Division Headquarters got really worried and tried calling the Captain's home. The captain answered. The conversation went like this:

                          Division Chief: We haven't heard from you in weeks. Is everything OK?

                          Captain: Everything is great. How are you?

                          Division Chief: Where are you?

                          Captain: I'm at home.

                          Division Chief: When are you coming in to work?

                          Captain: Never.

                          Division Chief: Why?

                          Captain: I retired.

                          Division Chief: When?

                          Captain: Three weeks ago.

                          Division Chief: Why didn't you tell us?

                          Captain: I thought I sent you a memo.

                          Division Chief: Where's all you state issue equipment?

                          Captain: In my desk.

                          Division Chief: Where is your take home car?

                          Chief: I left it at the motor pool in XXX office near my home. They have the keys.

                          Division Chief: Oh.

                          Captain: Any idea when you guys will be throwing my retirement party?

                          Division Chief: Uhhh.......






                          Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

                          Comment

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