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What bugs you the most about how cops are portrayed on tv shows?

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  • What bugs you the most about how cops are portrayed on tv shows?

    Example Shows
    1. Law and Order
    2. NYPD Blue
    3. Hill Street Blues
    4. Chicago PD
    5. The Wire

  • #2
    it's all fake and exaggerated for viewership

    Comment


    • #3
      I loved Hill Street Blues because although exaggerated, it pretty well portrayed the political BS law enforcement agencies were going through at the time. I could see many of my coworkers in each of the personalities of the characters. I think the writer who created the character of Belker must have gotten his inspiration from being jacked up by one of my partners back in the 1970s. I was sad to see the show go.

      Law & Order series - if it was real and each of the characters from cops to prosecutors were to actually act the way they do, they would all be in in prison. I find SVU to be particular irksome as it has turned away from law enforcement and become a social justice unit, misusing public funds, labor and resources for personal and social issues their Commander deems worthy rather than enforcing the law. I have never see so many victims hounded and coerced into testifying after repeatedly saying they no longer wished to pursue a matter.

      Chicago PD - An Intelligence Unit that works everything but Intelligence. Entertaining, but in real life most of them would be in prison.

      I'll take a pass on the others. Didn't watch them or haven't seen that much of them.





      Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

      Comment


      • #4
        I totally loved The Wire when it was on though.

        Comment


        • #5
          1. The willingness of the characters to break the rules to get results. In reality they would be jailed.
          2. People "transfer" from Florida to NYPD and come in the door as a detective. That isn't even almost how it works.

          There are more but I'll stop there.
          1*

          Comment


          • #6
            I don't watch much television so my comments are very general.

            What has always struck me about cop shows and movies is how they never have anything else to do except pursue the one case. When I was a patrol officer I typically handled 15 to 30 calls for service on each shift. As a young detective assigned to juvenile I always had a case load of 30 or more open cases, with 2 or 3 more coming in every day. As a property crimes detective I juggled 50 or more open cases every day. With court appearances, report writing, and a few hours of telephone tag every day there was little time available for very much soap opera nonsense (even meal breaks were infrequent).

            Sure, there were hot-shot cases where we all dropped everything to concentrate on a serious incident (homicide, kidnapping, serial armed robberies, whatever), but that was not the norm. Most days I had to go through my phone messages to correlate those to active cases, then review each case so I could do a phone follow-up or schedule an interview without sounding like an idiot. I carried two briefcases around just to keep my case files somewhat organized. Probably 10 years on the job before I ever had a desk assigned for my own personal use.

            There was never any cool music either, not even during a chase scene.

            We didn't wear designer clothes to work. Off the rack, close-out sale stuff was best, with a couple of changes in the locker for those days when clothes got torn up, ripped apart, or crap-stained so badly they were ready for the trash can (or the evidence room).

            My experiences were never glamorous. Mostly tedious drudge work with an occasional jolt of adrenalin now and then.

            Comment


            • #7
              I did like the first couple seasons of L&O because they gave a time and day snapshot. Those were typically months apart, which, if the viewer was paying attention, gave a good sense of how the world works.

              The Wire was written by a cop and newspaper editor. That is about as accurate as you are going to get. The policing and politics between Admin and rank and file, Admin and City leaders, Admin/Police and Courts, and the police and community were very on point. (For many of the old retired guys here, take a couple days/weeks and watch the the first season. It’s only 13 episodes).

              I have not been able to find hill street blues, but it’s in my list.

              I have never watched Chicago PD or NYPD Blue. I will add the Rookie with Nathan Fillion. When that show aired, I happened to have a late 40s trainee starting out. I watched episode one and stopped after that. They botched a DV in a way that would have cost them their jobs and the homicide victim’s family would have a sizable payout from the city of Los Angeles.

              For a good action film that does try to get it right, watch Hot Fuzz. It’s British, but very good.
              semper destravit

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by RGDS View Post

                I have not been able to find hill street blues, but it’s in my list.

                .
                Hero's & Icons network

                In my area it H & I is on a sub channel of one of the local channels over the air
                They air it Saturday nights at 11pm and at 1200 am back to back episodes

                Hulu streams it

                Well worth the time
                Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

                My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

                Comment


                • #9
                  How attractive they are

                  Comment


                  • BNWS
                    BNWS commented
                    Editing a comment
                    I agree. my co-workers and I more closely resemble the patrons of the star wars cantina than the actors in these shows.

                • #10
                  I don't watch cop shows. Something about actually doing it, as opposed to watching it on tv. I guess what would bother me is the people out there that believe that stuff.
                  As far as "rights" are concerned; I look at them this way... I don't tell you what church to go to, and you don't tell me what kind of firearm I can own...

                  Comment


                  • #11
                    I love it when someone does a "taste test" on dope. I'm waiting for one of them to taste fentanyl and croak.

                    I also laugh when they argue and fight to keep "their case". If the FBI came into my office saying they wanted to take over one of my cases I would hand it over, offer to buy them lunch and help them carry the evidence out the door. No argument from me...

                    Comment


                    • #12
                      I can't tell you what it is like in other departments, but in mine, patrol officers aren't subservient to detectives. I see so many shows where a detective calls over a "uniform" to "tag and bag" a piece of evidence that they, the detective, had found. If a detective handed me something they had already retrieved, I'd tell them to pound sand. Yep, detectives in my department get a gold badge for taking a test and passing an oral board, but they aren't supervisors.

                      Also, not saying detectives don't see their share of action, but again, in my department, the most likely action they will see is if they go and try to arrest someone for a warrant they had just worked up. It my turn into a scuffle and/or a foot pursuit, but they see FAR FAR FAR less action than a patrol officer does.

                      The use of personally owned vehicles and the way they depict officers walking or running while holding their handguns just drives me crazy. A cool car and running bent over like your pistol is 100 lbs may look cool, but it is just stupid to me.

                      Comment


                      • #13
                        Originally posted by angeredmgmt View Post
                        I can't tell you what it is like in other departments, but in mine, patrol officers aren't subservient to detectives. I see so many shows where a detective calls over a "uniform" to "tag and bag" a piece of evidence that they, the detective, had found. If a detective handed me something they had already retrieved, I'd tell them to pound sand. Yep, detectives in my department get a gold badge for taking a test and passing an oral board, but they aren't supervisors.

                        Also, not saying detectives don't see their share of action, but again, in my department, the most likely action they will see is if they go and try to arrest someone for a warrant they had just worked up. It my turn into a scuffle and/or a foot pursuit, but they see FAR FAR FAR less action than a patrol officer does.

                        The use of personally owned vehicles and the way they depict officers walking or running while holding their handguns just drives me crazy. A cool car and running bent over like your pistol is 100 lbs may look cool, but it is just stupid to me.
                        Agreed.

                        In some departments "detective" may be a rank, but in most departments it is only a duty assignment. I started out as a Patrolman 4th Class, worked up to Patrolman First Class, then I was assigned as a detective. My rank remained Patrolman First Class, and the pay was the same. When I made Sergeant I had to leave the detective bureau and return to patrol division, and as the junior sergeant I caught the night shift. The pay was a little better but the assignments were based on seniority, so I lost the little bit of weight I had as a more senior patrolman and went to being the junior sergeant.

                        Uniformed patrol officers were not in the same chain of command as assigned detectives. If I wanted or needed assistance I asked for it, and it was up to the patrol division shift supervisors to decide whether or not to help out. I had no authority to order anyone around on a regular basis.

                        Only the most serious crimes resulted in detectives being assigned to a crime scene. Most cases were handled by uniformed patrolmen, then their reports were sent over to the detective bureau for necessary follow-up work. Working patrol, we had very little interaction with the detectives unless we were assigned to assist on something (like a warrant service, when they wanted a uniform to be visible while a door was coming down).

                        We had unmarked cars for detectives, but they were essentially the same as the marked units but without the markings. For the narcotics officers, vice officers, and intelligence officers we had a variety of different vehicles, mostly harvested from the impound lot and converted for police use instead of being sold at the auctions. There was a used car dealer who was a retired Sergeant, and we occasionally borrowed cars for undercover use (the city was responsible for any damage that might happen). We also used city utilities and maintenance vehicles occasionally for surveillance work.

                        Later on I went to work for a state agency as an investigator. First time I ever had a vehicle assigned for my own use (not shared with other officers routinely), but that came with a 23,000 square mile territory to cover and be on call 24/7. I kept records of all fuel and maintenance costs, filed a monthly report, and got a reimbursement check 6 weeks later. Finally got a state-issued credit card a few years later. For a couple of years I was assigned an office in the state capitol annex, but there was no parking available so I had to pay a monthly fee for a parking space to park my state car, and never received compensation for that cost (or parking meters, or toll fees).

                        Comment


                        • #14
                          I don't know what it is like in other areas, but flashing a badge isn't the universal entry key as it is in the movies/shows. I have stories and anecdotes about this, but I don't want to bore everyone.

                          Comment


                          • #15
                            Originally posted by grog18b View Post
                            I don't watch cop shows. Something about actually doing it, as opposed to watching it on tv. I guess what would bother me is the people out there that believe that stuff.
                            Bingo. I'm retired- if somebody wants me to get involved in some kind of cop stuff, even if it's just on TV, they're gonna have to pay me...a lot...

                            Comment

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