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Rising gas price affecting your department?

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  • Rising gas price affecting your department?

    Just curious to know how the recent increase in gas prices have affected your department for street/highway patrols. Any conservation measures implemented? Limit your speeds.. Sit idle (engine off) for a certain period of time...?

    I understand that some cities/agencies pre-purchase gas at cheaper prices which helps even out the price fluctuations which might ease any department restrictions. Or do they?

    Thanks.
    Last edited by Jaguar57; 05-18-2007, 12:41 PM.

  • #2
    No idling (which is nothing new), and Sgts who are on patrol are able to get back on bikes if they are trained and still have gear...
    I'm 10-8 like a shark in a sea of crime..

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    • #3
      While the rising prices may have an impact on the agency's budget, the state is actually benefiting. In NYS, the state tax on gasoline is a percentage of the sale, not a flat cents/gallon tax. So, the higher the price, the more tax revenue there is.

      While it does cost the state more to buy gasoline, the state uses a very small percent of the total gasoline cosummed in the state. And so, on balance, they are coming out ahead.
      You can now follow me on twitter.

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      • #4
        They haven't asked us to change anything....yet. When we purchase fuel it's tax exempt so that helps, but I'm sure it will catch up eventually.
        Government exists to protect us from each other. Where government has gone beyond its limits is in deciding to protect us from ourselves.

        Ronald Reagan

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        • #5
          Two to a patrol car..?

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          • #6
            No impact yet... However, last year when prices spiked we were told to "conserve" fuel (turn the car off when not actually in the process of driving), which is not new as the policy already states that.
            "The price of freedom is eternal vigilance."

            Thomas Jefferson

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            • #7
              Nothing has came down from our brass on the subject. However I have been driving about half the miles I was and limit my idle time. I know if we don't we will get some sort of restrictions like loosing our take homes. Funny thing is just a few months ago they widened our take home use to surrounding counties. It is nice having a take home when fuel is 3 bucks plus.
              "Laws that forbid the carrying of arms. . . disarm only those who are neither inclined nor determined to commit crimes. . . Such laws make things worse for the assaulted and better for the assailants; they serve rather to encourage than to prevent homicides, for an unarmed man may be attacked with greater confidence than an armed man." - Thomas Jefferson

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              • #8
                nope, not at all
                "People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf." - Orwell

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by SlowDownThere View Post
                  While the rising prices may have an impact on the agency's budget, the state is actually benefiting. In NYS, the state tax on gasoline is a percentage of the sale, not a flat cents/gallon tax. So, the higher the price, the more tax revenue there is.

                  While it does cost the state more to buy gasoline, the state uses a very small percent of the total gasoline cosummed in the state. And so, on balance, they are coming out ahead.
                  What percentage is George Bush and Dick Cheney getting from the high gas prices?
                  The liberal politician has the only job where they go to the office to work for everyone but those who pay their salary.

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                  • #10
                    I heard once that the amount of gas it takes to start up a vehicle equals out to be 15 minutes worth of idle time. Don't know how true it is though. Now wouldn't the depts like to know this if they don't want you to sit at idle?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by CODE-30 View Post
                      I heard once that the amount of gas it takes to start up a vehicle equals out to be 15 minutes worth of idle time. Don't know how true it is though. Now wouldn't the depts like to know this if they don't want you to sit at idle?
                      Unfortunately not true. That may have been true before fuel injection. This is taken from www.consumerenergycenter.org.

                      The recommendation is: If you are going to be parked for more than 30 seconds, turn off the engine. Ten seconds of idling can use more fuel than turning off the engine and restarting it. And when you start your engine, don't step down on the accelerator, just simply turn the key to start (which you aren't suppose to do with fuel injected vehicles anyway).
                      "In God we trust, all others we run NCIC"

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                      • #12
                        Gas

                        Nothing new here, yet. I do recall in the nineties they tried to limit miles travelled and idle time. I wonder what changed that?

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                        • #13
                          In one of my old departments we could only put 80 miles per shift. That may sound like a lot(maybe not lol) but by the time we would pick up or drop off the oncoming officer/ drive to get gas we would have about 30 miles left...our borough was 24 square miles...there was almost no patrol time just answer calls get gas and taxi officers. No fun to say the least.

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