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How many applicants does your department usually get?

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  • How many applicants does your department usually get?

    And has this number gone down significantly due to all the recent controversy surrounding the profession?

  • #2
    Thousands and no
    The posts on this forum by this poster are of his personal opinion, and his personal opinion alone

    "Politicians are like diapers. They need to be changed often and for the same reason"

    "We fight not for glory; nor for wealth; nor honor, but only and alone we fight for freedom, which no good man surrenders but with his life"

    Comment


    • #3
      Our applicants are down significantly

      Directly above me is an answer from LASD...............one of the largest agencies in the country

      My agency is probably the polar opposite..................an 11 sworn person agency

      We just hired 3 deputies...........one from last years list and 2 from this springs testing

      We started with 22 applicants..............about 1/2 the number from 4 yrs ago
      16 showed up for testing and 5 passed testing and were interviewed.....................2 were hired BOTH were certified officers.
      Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

      My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

      Comment


      • #4
        12-15...we've been lucky to break 20 in recent years. We were in single digits for those who passed our last test.

        Whether it's an issue of "recent controversy surrounding the profession," however, is up for debate. Yes, that almost certainly has an effect on hiring across the board, but there are other aspects that are just as important. The economy is good right now, and LE recruitment numbers tend to drop during good economic times. LE positions are falling behind in both pay and benefits, so there's less and less reason to choose public service over the private sector. They're also no longer the secure jobs that they used to be...departments saw widespread layoffs during the Great Recession, something that hasn't happened since the 70's.

        All of that is ignoring specific issues that individual departments face in recruiting.

        All together, we're facing what has been described as a "recruitment crisis" in LE across the country.
        "He who fights with monsters might take care lest he thereby become a monster. And if you gaze for long into an abyss, the abyss gazes also into you."
        -Friedrich Nietzsche

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        • #5
          Law enforcement agencies have always been short-handed- hiring a sufficient number of officers is not a new problem.

          The talent pool is very, very shallow, when you're attempting to hire people who can pass a written exam, an oral board interview, a physical agility test, a criminal history check, drug screening, a credit check, a physical examination, a polygraph examination, psych testing, psych interview, a thorough background investigation, a nine-month academy, 4-8 months of FTO, and probationary at-will employment while doing police work, to enter a career that has a work schedule that involves working night and day, up to 20 hours a day or so, often on no notice, through holidays and weekends, while holding your pee, out in the elements, serving a community that hates you for political reasons, confronting criminals that want to kill you, and working for an organization that finds it easier to sacrifice individual officers than to allow blame for major incidents to rightfully climb the chain of command.

          Comment


          • orangebottle
            orangebottle commented
            Editing a comment
            But sometimes we get free coffee...so there's that.

        • #6
          We get thousands also, from all over the country. The number of applicants really hasn't gone down, however, the quality of the candidates has. That's the biggest difference.

          Comment


          • #7
            Originally posted by Aidokea View Post
            Law enforcement agencies have always been short-handed- hiring a sufficient number of officers is not a new problem.

            The talent pool is very, very shallow, when you're attempting to hire people who can pass a written exam, an oral board interview, a physical agility test, a criminal history check, drug screening, a credit check, a physical examination, a polygraph examination, psych testing, psych interview, a thorough background investigation, a nine-month academy, 4-8 months of FTO, and probationary at-will employment while doing police work, to enter a career that has a work schedule that involves working night and day, up to 20 hours a day or so, often on no notice, through holidays and weekends, while holding your pee, out in the elements, serving a community that hates you for political reasons, confronting criminals that want to kill you, and working for an organization that finds it easier to sacrifice individual officers than to allow blame for major incidents to rightfully climb the chain of command.
            And often for an employer that no longer offers a pension, doesn't contribute to social security, and pays about the same as sanitation work....

            RE: number of applicants: I was talking with a Sgt. for a small department (30 sworn) recently about this issue. His point: the number of applicants hasn't changed, but attrition is higher than ever. More people are leaving between the 1-5 year mark, and not for other agencies. They're going into a different line of work completely. Back in the day, people would hire around age 23 and stay entire careers.

            He was saying the frequent turnover has changed the hiring cycle from every couple years to a constant state of selecting and training, a huge diversion of time and resources for a small department, especially knowing 30% of the people hired won't be around for very long.

            It's the new normal.

            The reality is.... we get what we pay for. Cops should be paid $100K/year and have a modest pension. So should teachers. That's how you attract top notch people and keep them. A society which cannot properly protect or educate its' people is destined for dysfunction.



            Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity.

            Hanlon's razor

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            • #8
              Originally posted by LA Copper View Post
              We get thousands also, from all over the country. The number of applicants really hasn't gone down, however, the quality of the candidates has. That's the biggest difference.
              Aint that the truth
              The posts on this forum by this poster are of his personal opinion, and his personal opinion alone

              "Politicians are like diapers. They need to be changed often and for the same reason"

              "We fight not for glory; nor for wealth; nor honor, but only and alone we fight for freedom, which no good man surrenders but with his life"

              Comment


              • #9
                Originally posted by LA DEP View Post
                Thousands and no


                I’ll see your thousands and raise you 500…..every time standards are lowered the number of applicants increase.



                The American standard….
                Last edited by BTDT2; 07-12-2019, 12:52 PM.

                Comment


                • #10
                  Originally posted by LA Copper View Post
                  We get thousands also, from all over the country. The number of applicants really hasn't gone down, however, the quality of the candidates has. That's the biggest difference.
                  Yeah, if I had to put a label on it, I would say that it seems to be a millennial thing. The work ethic, sense of duty, respect for senior officers, and all that stuff we used to take for granted in this profession, is absolutely on the decline. To be fair, it's certainly not all of them. But I have seen rookies demonstrate no initiative, waiting for senior officers to step forward to do things for them, not showing up to cases where they know that we could use some extra hands, slow to offer to help, slow to volunteer to cover shifts, excessive use of sick time, hiding and sleeping during the night as soon as they get out of FTO, and so on.

                  I was the phase three FTO for a young trainee officer that somehow got hired, made it all the way through a 9-month academy, passed his first two phases of FTO on the first try and was getting passing scores for the first two weeks of phase three (at which point they gave him to me)...and he was utterly incapable of dealing with stress. He was a really nice guy, and I liked him, but he just froze up and lost the ability to communicate whenever he encountered any stress. I spent the last two weeks of phase three just peeling him off the ceiling every day trying to get him not to hyperventilate. He wasn't even able to do phase one work, and there was simply no way to get him ready for phase four. I documented everything, but in spite of that, the brass ignored it and passed him on to phase four. Fortunately for him and everyone else, he quit during phase four.

                  Comment


                  • #11
                    Originally posted by BTDT2 View Post



                    I’ll see your thousands and raise you 500…..every time standards are lowered the number of applicants increase.



                    The American standard….
                    Lowering the standards, usually done for political reasons, trying to use the police department as some kind of petri dish to conduct a social experiment in (like "diversity goals") is always a bad idea. It can also make for some pretty scary days at the range.

                    Comment


                    • #12
                      Originally posted by Ratatatat View Post

                      And often for an employer that no longer offers a pension, doesn't contribute to social security, and pays about the same as sanitation work....

                      RE: number of applicants: I was talking with a Sgt. for a small department (30 sworn) recently about this issue. His point: the number of applicants hasn't changed, but attrition is higher than ever. More people are leaving between the 1-5 year mark, and not for other agencies. They're going into a different line of work completely. Back in the day, people would hire around age 23 and stay entire careers.

                      He was saying the frequent turnover has changed the hiring cycle from every couple years to a constant state of selecting and training, a huge diversion of time and resources for a small department, especially knowing 30% of the people hired won't be around for very long.

                      It's the new normal.

                      The reality is.... we get what we pay for. Cops should be paid $100K/year and have a modest pension...That's how you attract top notch people and keep them. A society which cannot properly protect...its' people is destined for dysfunction.


                      I agree, except for the teacher part.

                      But even with rookies making $100K+ a year, it's hard to attract good candidates. Maybe if the starting wages were $200K a year we'd be able to attract better candidates.

                      Comment


                      • #13
                        Can't advise on numbers, but I know that background and recruiting are struggling. Don't blame them. I was glad to retire. Go ahead and call me what you want. I always treated people fairly and...……….you people are paying my pension! Laughing all the way to the bank.

                        Comment


                        • #14
                          well, when we have say... 3 openings, we may get 40, and we narrow down to 6 for interviews
                          Former Police Officer (Injured LOD)
                          USAF VETERAN 2004-2012
                          "The sheep pretend the wolf will never come, but the sheepdog lives for that day."-LTC Grossman
                          Emergency Services Dispatcher, APG MD

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                          • #15
                            RCMP. Thousands, from across Canada. No change.
                            We train between 160 to 1200 a year, with Troops starting weekly.
                            #32936 - Royal Canadian Mounted Police - 1975-10-27 / 2010-12-29
                            Proud Dad of #54266 - RCMP - 2007-02-12 to date
                            RCMP Veterans Association - Regina Division member
                            Mounted Police Professional Association of Canada - Associate (Retired) member
                            "Smile" - no!

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