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  • Combat

    Tell me if I am wrong. I know kids, that have joined the military, some Marines some Army and Navy that were deployed to Afghanistan and Iraq. They are local residents here that went from high school to combat situations. I have seen them on leave, and most of them tell me that they would like to become pollice officers when they are discharged.

    I myself have seen a lot of soldiers fresh out of combat and Im not sure if they could handle non combat for the first 2 years so Ive recommended that a few of them join an active swat team in several large population cities so they didnt get ptsd from going from combat to nothing. Am I wrong or would some of these people be better suited to join an active team until they adjust back to the domesticated "peaceful" (if you want to call it that) life?

  • #2
    I think that many places don't have full time active SWAT teams, so it would be difficult to have someone aim solely for SWAT. Also, most SWAT Officers spend a minimum of 3 years on the street. That may vary per department. I think that some good counseling or therapy would be more helpful than taking someone from a combat situation and immediately putting them on a SWAT team. Besides, from all of the Officers I've talked too, the differences between a combat zone in the military and a SWAT situation are quite large. Just my thoughts though.
    I disaprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it. -Voltaire

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    • #3
      Differences, you bet. Maybe not as many as you would think though.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Royale View Post
        I myself have seen a lot of soldiers fresh out of combat and Im not sure if they could handle non combat for the first 2 years so Ive recommended that a few of them join an active swat team in several large population cities so they didnt get ptsd from going from combat to nothing. Am I wrong or would some of these people be better suited to join an active team until they adjust back to the domesticated "peaceful" (if you want to call it that) life?
        You are wrong. They can't get hired on a police department and go right to SWAT. They will need several years to prove themselves as exceptional patrol officers before being considered for SWAT, and then will have keen competition.

        Many previous generations have come back from war and gone into nonmilitary jobs without PTSD. The current group of young soldiers returning home will do just fine.
        Government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem. - Ronald Reagan

        I don't think It'll happen in the US because we don't trust our government. We are a country of skeptics, raised by skeptics, founded by skeptics. - Amaroq

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        • #5
          Most dept.'s Swat, ES , ERT whatever they call themselves are elite divisions that are widely applied for. I seriously doubt that someone fresh out of the military, though maybe qualified, would get that assignment right out of the academy. There's a pecking order and rookies are at the bottom.
          "Fast is fine, but accuracy is everything!"-Wyatt Earp

          "You never know when crazy will show up!"-Irishdep

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          • #6
            Originally posted by 11b101abn View Post
            Differences, you bet. Maybe not as many as you would think though.
            Actually probably more than you (he) might think.
            Two people can keep a secret if one of them is dead.

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            • #7
              SWAT, SAU, whatever you call them usually takes years to get to, so that bit of advice is invalid. I've worked with some great young vets,& while you're concern seems genuine,it's really not necessary or related to civilian LE. The medical world is MUCH more aware of things like PTSD now & deals with it accordingly (generally) but also ther'e VERY little, if any, relation to civilian LE & combat. A soldier is generally not concerned with capturing his adversary, police officers--that's their job.The 2 worlds work by a completely separate set of rules.

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              • #8
                Being both an Iraq Vet and a Police Officer I can tell you there are major differences between a combat zone and law enforcement. There are major differences between the military and law enforcement. However, coming from active combat to civilian life no matter what field your going into is going to be stressful. It's something you have to adapt to no matter what.

                Also... In MY opinion. Military Tactics and Law Enforcement tactics are completely opposite of each other. A lot of LE agencies are trying to turn around and close the gap on certain aspects of military operations in urban terrain (MOUT). However, soldiers from a combat zone provide a good insight on what certain agencies should consider in tactical circumstances They also generally work better with other veterans who they come in contact with on the street.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Royale View Post
                  I myself have seen a lot of soldiers fresh out of combat and Im not sure if they could handle non combat for the first 2 years so Ive recommended that a few of them join an active swat team in several large population cities so they didnt get ptsd from going from combat to nothing. Am I wrong or would some of these people be better suited to join an active team until they adjust back to the domesticated "peaceful" (if you want to call it that) life?

                  REAL BAD IDEA off the bat and I will tell you why. Spend a year in Iraq doing combat sweeps as an INF soldier and you will clear some houses. In Iraq, you open the door and a guy is standing there holding a gun, or a knife, or what looks like an IED he gets popped and you move to the next house, etc etc.

                  Flash forward to a SWAT entry during a high risk warrant or hostage situation. If you fall back into Iraq house clearing mode and do the same thing on a SWAT call...well its just not the same for obvious reasons. A soldier fresh from active combat assignments needs time to decompress and get back into the mode of average joe. This can take anywhere from a month to years, but they need to get back to the mindset they had prior to a deployment, the rules are 100% different.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by VSPClem View Post
                    REAL BAD IDEA off the bat and I will tell you why. Spend a year in Iraq doing combat sweeps as an INF soldier and you will clear some houses. In Iraq, you open the door and a guy is standing there holding a gun, or a knife, or what looks like an IED he gets popped and you move to the next house, etc etc.

                    Flash forward to a SWAT entry during a high risk warrant or hostage situation. If you fall back into Iraq house clearing mode and do the same thing on a SWAT call...well its just not the same for obvious reasons. A soldier fresh from active combat assignments needs time to decompress and get back into the mode of average joe. This can take anywhere from a month to years, but they need to get back to the mindset they had prior to a deployment, the rules are 100% different.

                    I dont know, if I kick a door and see a guy with a gun, bomb or possibly even a knife depending on what he doing at the time, he probably going to get shot.

                    I agree with the decompression. it take some a bit longer to "get over" the war episode they live through than others.
                    It takes a Wolf.......

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Chief Wiggum View Post
                      Actually probably more than you (he) might think.
                      Speakin for myself, I find that the Individual tactics are not polar opposites. Room clearing and the like. The Armed forces gained the techniques from law enforcement (largely).

                      Mindset, however is a differant matter and an individual soldier most likely a grunt), needs time to decompress. the time varies, and some need none at all. I needed very little. Mostly to adjust back to a garrison mindset, as I have had zero issues with what I have done/seen.

                      The most prominent feature of my service as a whole, is that I have zero, I mean ZERO, tolerance for bullsh*t. That is not alway a positive trait in a somewhat bullsh*t heavy profession.

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                      • #12
                        I had the opportunity to work with many WWII and Korea War veterans when I started into police work. I was in the military from 1959-1963 - an era that encompassed the early stages of Viet Nam.

                        I guess that all of us were fortunate that we were able to separate our previous expeiences from the real world of the "here and now".

                        Although I am certain that most, if not all, of us suffered from some degree of PTSD, we were totally capable of filtering the past and controlling our actions.

                        Don't worry so much for those returning from the MiddleEast conflicts who want to enter law enforcement. They are more resiliant than you can imagine. Such has been the case since the early times of civilized mankind. Have faith and they will succeed.
                        Be courteous to all, but intimate with few, and let those few be well tried before you give them your confidence!

                        [George Washington (1732 - 1799)]

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Irishluck31 View Post
                          I dont know, if I kick a door and see a guy with a gun, bomb or possibly even a knife depending on what he doing at the time, he probably going to get shot.

                          I agree with the decompression. it take some a bit longer to "get over" the war episode they live through than others.
                          No...I totally agree....that guy will probably get shot like you say, and more times than not its a good shoot. The difference I was talking about was that in Iraq there wont be a storm of media and public "leaders" demanding your head on a plate. There also will not be the same amount of public second guessing etc etc. Its just a different set of rules to adapt to, and that adaptation is the hard part.

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                          • #14
                            No

                            Originally posted by Royale View Post
                            Tell me if I am wrong. I know kids, that have joined the military, some Marines some Army and Navy that were deployed to Afghanistan and Iraq. They are local residents here that went from high school to combat situations. I have seen them on leave, and most of them tell me that they would like to become pollice officers when they are discharged.

                            I myself have seen a lot of soldiers fresh out of combat and Im not sure if they could handle non combat for the first 2 years so Ive recommended that a few of them join an active swat team in several large population cities so they didnt get ptsd from going from combat to nothing. Am I wrong or would some of these people be better suited to join an active team until they adjust back to the domesticated "peaceful" (if you want to call it that) life?
                            Being a combat veteran and a 13year veteran Patrol Officer now a supervisor I understand your point however Police work and Military differ in that it takes a maturity you can only get from a few years of experiences as a Police Officer to make better decisions that are related to the overall mission. The PDSD is something they will hopefully do fine with and be able to seperate from their new lives as complex decision makers. But combat zone to swat team. No probably not. Though we are supposed to be in a war on crime aren't we?
                            "Some people spend an entire lifetime wondering if they made a difference in the world. The MARINES don't have that problem." ....Ronald Reagan

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