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  • Interpol Question

    Does anyone here have information on joining Interpol? Ive tried doing online research but cant seem to find anything. Interpol being the international police force.

  • #2
    Interpol

    Interpol is actually a treaty agreement, not an international police force. At it's most basic form Interpool shares information concerning wanted persons among the world's law enforcment agencies. It has been instrumental in the apprehension of quite a few international bad guys. You can probably do a Google Search and see the actual member nations of Interpol. Iran is one of those nations, although it's cooperation in law enforcement matters with the U.S. Great Britain, etc, might be a little questionable at present. I'm sure some other forum members can provide you with more information concerning Interpol.

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    • #3
      As an organiation, Interpol does hire a few personnel from time to time, to help coordinate efforts between participating countries. Current Interpol vacancies can be found at:

      http://www.interpol.int/Public/Icpo/...t/vacances.asp
      Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

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      • #4
        DOJ advertises for Interpol jobs from time-to-time..... They fall under GS-0301 (Admin and Program Staff) and are Non-LEO jobs......

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Psalm73 View Post
          Does anyone here have information on joining Interpol?
          As has been noted, Interpol is a clearing house for information. It doesn't do investigations or have agents. It's also based in France so you'd have to be prepared to move there.
          I'm a little bit waayy, a little bit wooah, a little bit woosh, I'm a geezer.

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          • #6
            Anyone else have any thoughts?

            Im also interested in Interpol.

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            • #7
              Go to www.interpol.int and then the link for recruitment. It tells you what's available and even how to settle in to Lyons in France, where you'd be living.

              I'm not trying to be rude zx, but it took me ten seconds to find all that.
              I'm a little bit waayy, a little bit wooah, a little bit woosh, I'm a geezer.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Cockney Corner. View Post
                Go to www.interpol.int and then the link for recruitment. It tells you what's available and even how to settle in to Lyons in France, where you'd be living.

                I'm not trying to be rude zx, but it took me ten seconds to find all that.
                Google is an amazing thing....isn't it.....?

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                • #9
                  The easiest way for a local department to utilize Interpol is to contact one of the larger federal agencies, FBI, DEA, ICE, U.S. Marshals, who all have personnel assigned to Interpol headquarters, and can assist local agencies with accessing the resources of Interpol.

                  If you are an individual, just wanting to work there, I think you would have a better chance of winning the lottery. First you would have to be hired by one of the federal agencies, and then you would have to be selected for that slot, and then generally, it would not be a permanent assignement, but only for a set number of years.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Group 29 View Post
                    If you are an individual, just wanting to work there, I think you would have a better chance of winning the lottery. First you would have to be hired by one of the federal agencies, and then you would have to be selected for that slot
                    Not necessarily. If your life's goal was to work for Interpol, you could join as an IT support tech, an intelligence analyst or the like. And learn another language if you only speak English.

                    Interpol is a hugely under-used resource (a few days ago, Interpol pointed out that we didn't seem to be using their rather helpful list of stolen passports). But when, very occasionally, I have to speak to foreign police agencies, I invariably find it easier just to contact them myself. Otherwise I have to submit a form to my force Interpol co-ordinator, who forwards it the national Interpol liaison who sends it to France, and then presumably back down the same route at the other end.
                    I'm a little bit waayy, a little bit wooah, a little bit woosh, I'm a geezer.

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                    • #11
                      Group, has it changed? In my day, the Secret Service was the Interpol contact point. Not withstanding that the FBI has a S/A in every U.S. embassy, (Legal Attache), and Customs and DEA have officers assigned to some countries.
                      "A man who has nothing which he cares about more than he does about his personal safety is a miserable creature who has no chance of being free, unless made and kept so by the existing of better men than himself."
                      John Stuart Mill

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Cockney Corner. View Post
                        Go to www.interpol.int and then the link for recruitment. It tells you what's available and even how to settle in to Lyons in France, where you'd be living.

                        I'm not trying to be rude zx, but it took me ten seconds to find all that.

                        I was actually looking for people's thoughts on it. As in, does anyone have any experience with Interpol or maybe know someone who worked for them, etc....

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                        • #13
                          I work with the interpol system alot, and as has been said here, it is a very underused and handy tool and they are currently looking for seconded criminal intelligence officers. An opening I have found very tempting to needle at...

                          Anyway, there is in every crime-fighting network a horrible lack of intelligence officers, what is called Human Intelligence, or HUMINT. I note that both you, Psalm, and ZX are rather young, and at the general "student age," so I would really encourage you to look into this field.

                          It's not a terribly easy field to get into, but neither is it rocket science - it takes natural skills of memory, intuition, and investigative mindsets; charisma is also important, intelligence, discipline. You would need a B.Sc or B.A. degree minimum, and I would recommend a field such as Prelaw or legal studies with a criminal justice minor, an international relations degree with a psychology minor (or visa versa), or if you can find a decent program, an Intelligence Studies B.Sc. Mercyhurst, Georgetown, and Embry-Riddle all have great programs in those fields.

                          Beyond that, travel. At the least, go abroad for a year of your studies. France, Jordan, Egypt, or any of the asian or former russian republics are a good choice. Your ideal route would be to enter the military after college, and do a few years as an officer focusing on intelligence related issues. Whatever you do, it is vital that you learn how to absorb and analyze cultural behaviors and make useful contacts for your working relationships.

                          When you're done with your 'schoolin, nail down an internship. Don't rush right into the market, you need some experience to give you an edge. We have some great internships here at the D.o.S. that would work well, as do the CIA, and private groups like Stratfor. Interpol even has internships - you can also do these during college for credit experience.

                          So you have a Bachelor's degree, you've got some work in the field under your belt - now it's time to choose which way you want to go. Federal, municipal, international, or private sector. All of them have their merits and downsides. If you are interested in Interpol, then a municipal PD or a federal agency are your best two choices - international follows suit, and generally leads to private-sector "retirement" possibilities.

                          From my two cents - get on with a large municipal PD. Express early and often your interest in police intelligence, and do everything you can to show your adeptness in that field. At that point, you can either choose to settle in as an intelligence officer there, or go the federal route. Keep lobbying for yourself, proving yourself, and your goals will all fall into place.

                          Good luck with whatever you decide to do!
                          Against organized crime, internal affairs is my defensive hand; Intelligence officers are my offensive hand.
                          The late William H. Parker, Chief LAPD 1950 - 1966
                          |||
                          Fir Na Dli

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Sleuth View Post
                            Group, has it changed? In my day, the Secret Service was the Interpol contact point. Not withstanding that the FBI has a S/A in every U.S. embassy, (Legal Attache), and Customs and DEA have officers assigned to some countries.
                            You know, they might be the lead agency now that you mention it. But, I see the positions advertised for our slots at Interpol from time to time so I know we have at least one guy there, but we have so many guys stationed in other countries that I always go through them (we even have some foreign cops assigned to some of our bigger field divisions, the guy from the UK used to be in an office near me in one of them ).

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                            • #15
                              Yes, we had some foreign nationals come through our academy when I was teaching. They were employees of our agency in their home country. The did not carry firearms or make arrests, unless allowed by thei home country.
                              "A man who has nothing which he cares about more than he does about his personal safety is a miserable creature who has no chance of being free, unless made and kept so by the existing of better men than himself."
                              John Stuart Mill

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