Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

is this true??

Collapse

300x250 Mobile

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • is this true??

    I was wondering if anyone saw the 60 minutes that was on the other day (I am overseas so I am not sure how old it is). They were talking about how certain rappers are telling people in their songs, not to snitch to the cops. They promote t-shirts that say don’t snitch. Also in the report they talked about how some cities are having a real hard time solving crimes/murders because no one is providing any information. I know you’re always going to have that one person who won’t talk. I was wondering is this really happening in some cities???

  • #2
    I think (Camron?) said even if he knew he neighbor was a serial killer he would not rat on him and loose his street credit. Let me see if I can find it, someone posted it on a NJ forum when the family and neighbors of a boy who was gunned down would not help the police.


    Found it.


    "PLATINUM SELLING RAPPER TELLS '60 MINUTES': WOULDN'T HELP POLICE CATCH EVEN A SERIAL KILLER BECAUSE IT WOULD HURT HIS BUSINESS AND VIOLATE HIS 'CODE OF ETHICS'
    Thu Apr 19 2007 12:47:1 ET

    Rap star Cam'ron says there's no situation -- including a serial killer living next door -- that would cause him to help police in any way, because to do so would hurt his music sales and violate his "code of ethics." Cam'ron, whose real name is Cameron Giles, talks to Anderson Cooper for a report on how the hip-hop culture's message to shun the police has undermined efforts to solve murders across the country. Cooper's report will be broadcast on 60 MINUTES Sunday, April 22 (7:00-8:00 PM, ET/PT) on the CBS Television Network.

    "If I knew the serial killer was living next door to me?" Giles responds to a hypothetical question posed by Cooper. "I wouldn't call and tell anybody on him -- but I'd probably move," says Giles. "But I'm not going to call and be like, ÔThe serial killer's in 4E.' " ( For an excerpt of Giles' interview, click here

    Giles' "code of ethics" also extends to crimes committed against him. After being shot and wounded by gunmen, Giles refused to cooperate with police. Why? "Because...it would definitely hurt my business, and the way I was raised, I just don't do that," says Giles. Pressed by Cooper, who says had he been the victim, he would want his attacker to be caught, Giles explains further: "But then again, you're not going to be on the stage tonight in the middle of, say, Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina, with people with gold and platinum teeth and dreadlocks jumping up and down singing your songs, either," says Giles. "We're in two different lines of business."

    "So for you, it's really about business?" Cooper asks.

    "It's about business," Giles says, "but it's still also a code of ethics."

    Rappers appear to be concerned about damaging what's known as their "street credibility," says Geoffrey Canada, an anti-violence advocate and educator from New York City's Harlem neighborhood. "It's one of those things that sells music and no one really quite understands why," says Canada. Their fans look up to artists if they come from the "meanest streets of the urban ghetto," he tells Cooper. For that reason, Canada says, they do not cooperate with the police.

    Canada says in the poor New York City neighborhood he grew up in, only the criminals didn't talk to the police, but within today's hip-hop culture, that's changed. "It is now a cultural norm that is being preached in poor communities....It's like you can't be a black person if you have a set of values that say ÔI will not watch a crime happen in my community without getting involved to stop it,'" Canada tells Cooper.

    Young people from some of New York's toughest neighborhoods echo Canada's assessment, calling the message not to help police "the rules" and helping the police "a crime" in their neighborhoods. These "rules" are contributing to a much lower percentage of arrests in homicide cases -- a statistic known as the "clearance rate" -- in largely poor, minority neighborhoods throughout the country, according to Prof. David Kennedy of the John Jay College of Criminal Justice. "I work in communities where the clearance rate for homicides has gone into the single digits," says Kennedy. The national rate for homicide clearance is 60 percent. "In these neighborhoods, we are on the verge of -- or maybe we have already lost -- the rule of law," he tells Cooper.

    Says Canada, "It's like we're saying to the criminals, ÔYou can have our community....Do anything you want and we will either deal with it ourselves or we'll simply ignore it.' "
    _________________
    A man has got to know his limitations.

    Comment


    • #3
      Let's see if Al and Jesse rally on this rappers house. And denounse his actions.
      IGNORE LIST - Banastretarlton AKA "banana boy"

      "In the fields of observation chance favors only prepared mind"
      -----Louis Pasteur

      "Sweat in training saves blood on the battlefield."

      -------Col. David "Hack" Hackworth

      On my 7 year old 2nd Grade Class wall

      ------------YOU are RESPONSIBLE for YOUR OWN ACTIONS

      Comment


      • #4
        Yeah, they talk big, but get almost anyone in an interview room with state prison hanging over their head and they'll dime their own mother out. I really like the suburban white kids wearing the "Don't Snitch" t-shirts. They'll be singing inside of five minutes.
        Government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem. - Ronald Reagan

        I don't think It'll happen in the US because we don't trust our government. We are a country of skeptics, raised by skeptics, founded by skeptics. - Amaroq

        Comment


        • #5
          True.


          Here's the video for those who missed it.
          http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2007/...r=U.S._2704565
          This profession is not for people looking for positive reinforcement from the public. Very often it can be a thankless job and you can't desire accolades, because those are not usually forthcoming. Just do your job to the best of your ability and live with the decisions you've made.

          Comment


          • #6
            What about that Philadelphia Firefighter, paid full time municipal employee of emergency services who also raps in his spare time, advocating killing cops.

            http://www.officer.com/article/artic...&siteSection=1

            Comment


            • #7
              http://www.cafepress.com/stopsnitchinyo/

              Comment


              • #8
                This is a big deal, guys. We are losing our minority community one individual at a time. Good people live there too. In fear. However, its hard to "snitch" on one of your fellow residents and have to go back and live there. That's why those TIPS hotlines have become such an important item for the impoverished communities.

                A man should never be ashamed to own that he has been in the wrong, which is but saying... that he is wiser today than yesterday. Jonathan Swift 1667-1745

                It's only a conspiracy when your party is not in power.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by LeanG View Post
                  This is a big deal, guys. We are losing our minority community one individual at a time. Good people live there too. In fear. However, its hard to "snitch" on one of your fellow residents and have to go back and live there. That's why those TIPS hotlines have become such an important item for the impoverished communities.

                  Yes, we are losing our minority community one individual at a time but you have to stop and ask yourself why that is. I think our minority communities need to start taking stock and responsibility for the communities that they reside in. I don't want to get on any crazy tangents here but people are people. In the county I work we have white communities that are our crime hotspots. There just as in urban ghettoes the problem is that noone takes responsibility for their community.

                  Most of us have seen it before. Some young man gets stabbed or shot and when you arrive its in a heavily populated area and nobody ever sees anything. Once in a while a 7 year old will walk up and right when he/she is about to tell you what they saw an older family member grabs them and whisks them away. I don't know whether its cowardice from these communities or whether it sticking to this ridiculous credo of stop snitching but untill people really want change enough to help with it themselves they will keep circling the drain.

                  just my 2 cents.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Stop Snitchin' has been a real problem in Philadelphia this past summer. Kids were wearing Tee shirts with a stop sign with the phrase emblazoned on it. We've seen vendors selling the shirts, rap music promo trucks advertising it, and on and on.
                    They tried to counter it with a media promo of "Step up, speak up" with some very limited success.
                    "The streets of Philadelphia are safe...it's the people that make them unsafe"---Frank Rizzo
                    http://hometown.aol.com/ppd9886/PhillyCopSpot.html

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      nothing new

                      Originally posted by roces95 View Post
                      I was wondering if anyone saw the 60 minutes that was on the other day (I am overseas so I am not sure how old it is). They were talking about how certain rappers are telling people in their songs, not to snitch to the cops. They promote t-shirts that say don’t snitch. Also in the report they talked about how some cities are having a real hard time solving crimes/murders because no one is providing any information. I know you’re always going to have that one person who won’t talk. I was wondering is this really happening in some cities???
                      Thats been going on since Public Enemy and Ice Cube. They whine about the POE//leece not helping them at the same time. Rappers are trash. They steal others music and throw in a crime ridden rhyme. No talent. Code of Ethics are they dont have one. They would talk if they were poor instead of millionaires there is no incentive for them to talk when crime solvers wont pay their sock bill.
                      "Some people spend an entire lifetime wondering if they made a difference in the world. The MARINES don't have that problem." ....Ronald Reagan

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        in this world which i need not remind anyone,,there is GOOD AND BAD.right?no,no no..all human..at least i think...all humans,regardless of upbringing,background,social status,financial,on and on...choose a certain path.the world is not as black and white as some would and do believe.you cant be entirely good..and conquer the bad.you cant be fully evil,and destroy the good.right??choose your path,and find the m i d d l e ground.hope that dont sound too crazy.just love all you can,life is short.of course sometimes the only way to beat an a..hole,is to be a bigger and better one,with back up of courselol

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Street cred..? LMAO

                          They live in multi-million dollar gated neighborhoods, drive cars that cost more then average homes, and need multipal body guards just to walk out to their mail box and wave at their senior citizen neighbors.


                          Yeah, street cred
                          RIP Officer Josh Williams
                          Old Fort, NC PD # 919... 10-42... 02/01/2007

                          Our loss is heaven's gain

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Nightshift va View Post
                            Thats been going on since Public Enemy and Ice Cube. They whine about the POE//leece not helping them at the same time. Rappers are trash. They steal others music and throw in a crime ridden rhyme. No talent. Code of Ethics are they dont have one. They would talk if they were poor instead of millionaires there is no incentive for them to talk when crime solvers wont pay their sock bill.
                            Nothing like Public Enemy's "911 is a joke". Let's face it, no one really likes the police. Usually when we come, it's to visit unpleasantness upon someone. I'm not saying violence so don't assume. When we come, people get arrested, cars get impounded, houses get seized, etc. And now you add the "hero's" of the community race-wise, the rappers you see standing up against the police, speaking in favor of doing violence to the police, etc etc. and this influences the youth. It's not much different that looking at Israeli and Palestinian communities. Bear with me, since the palestinian's are raised from birth to hate and fight the Israeli's so are the black populous. I'm not including hispanic, though they've had their beefs with police, but you won't hear it on 60 minutes as readily as blacks vs. the police even if the department itself is mostly black. There is nothing you can do that will win the police support in these communities. We can be all goody goody and do community projects and assistance and build parks but at the end of the day, we're still the bad guys. Oh, and cam'ron, lol, he'll fade to black just like ever other rapper before him soon enough. Rap IMO should've died with the '80's. Atleast back then it had messages of positiveness and making something of yourself. Now it's just crap.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by MPSoldier84 View Post
                              What about that Philadelphia Firefighter, paid full time municipal employee of emergency services who also raps in his spare time, advocating killing cops.

                              http://www.officer.com/article/artic...&siteSection=1
                              He was recently fired.
                              "The streets of Philadelphia are safe...it's the people that make them unsafe"---Frank Rizzo
                              http://hometown.aol.com/ppd9886/PhillyCopSpot.html

                              Comment

                              MR300x250 Tablet

                              Collapse

                              What's Going On

                              Collapse

                              There are currently 5723 users online. 307 members and 5416 guests.

                              Most users ever online was 158,966 at 04:57 AM on 01-16-2021.

                              Welcome Ad

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X