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  • Police Academy.

    I am just curious what the format of the police academy that you LEO's attended was like? I know that some are more like a bootcamp than others. For the ones that aren't (Tech Colleges), what is the usual format like? Is it the kind of setup where students walk single file, and salute? Also, during the Academy, what kind of classes did you go through, and what kind of exams did you have? Do you do the basic classes such as Math, English, Reading, etc? I'm just trying to prep myself so that I have some kind of an idea what to expect. I know that obviously you do a lot of hands on type stuff - Emergency Vehicle Operation, Shooting, Defense tactics, etc... If some LEO's could chime in, that would be awesome.

  • #2
    Mine was a Boot-camp type setup, No residency however. Our day started at 0545 with a 5 mile run, then to the local college for PT until 830, then back for morning formation at 0900. class till 1200 with one 15 min break; Lunch (or More PT) from 1200-1300; class till around 1600 with another break. Add in the yelling, screaming, and other Mickey-Mouse BS and you had a full day.

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    • #3
      I can only speak of the classes in NC because every state is different...but there was no "standard" college classes, meaning that we didn't do the math, science, english, etc. Yes, there is some math when you're talking DWI or whatever, but not what you're referencing. There is Constitutional law, civil procedure, arrest search and seizure, handcuffing, defensive tactics, driving, juvenile law, court procedure, domestic violence, first responders, ethics, ABC laws, DUI, physical fitness, etc. (I think it's somewhere around 650 hours in NC now) That's the part that I enjoyed the most...you're learning things that you'd never had in the college setting before. We had physical fitness for the first 3 months of class (no residency at mine either, but it was para-military in nature).
      sigpic

      I don't agree with your opinion, but I respect its straightforwardness in terms of wrongness.

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      • #4
        In TX it's 640 hours; however, some academies are more. I did the Community College thing; some don't even do PT but mine did.

        They found they could get better instructors in the afternoon/evening, so our day ran from 1300-2200 Mon-Thurs, and Fri 0830-1750. Of course we did the hands-on requirements, but when I think about my time there, I think about sitting in a classroom. All the things Smurfette listed.

        Our PT was 1 hour, Mon-Thurs. At the end of the day, 9-10 PM. On Friday, we were there from 0830-1730, but since Friday was when they handed out the homework assignment, we were often done by noon. The homework was considerable, but not intellectual. We had to copy various laws out by hand. Average was about 15 hours each weekend, but Traffic was 25.5 hours for me - 107 pages on standard notebook paper. Didn't get much sleep that weekend.

        Then I get hired and find out a lot of academies don't have homework at all. Oh well, everyone that made it through passed the test the first time.

        All in all, I liked my academy. It was not very military, although you knew to say "Yes, Ma'am" to the class coordinator. None of our instructors cared about that stuff. But, they had good standards. You weren't allowed to take the state test unless your average in class was at least 80%. We also had to shoot 80 to qualify, as opposed to 70 for the state. The PT standards weren't that bad, but they were absolute - we had a slow runner that wasn't allowed to take the state test, as well as one guy injured in DT who couldn't do the pushups.
        If trees could scream, would we be so cavalier about cutting them down? We might, if they screamed all the time, for no good reason.

        ---Jack Handey

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        • #5
          700+ hours, Mon - Fri 8am to 6pm. Bootcamp style, classwork or hands on training 3/4 of the day than PT for the last. Really sucked while there but now that I look back on it.. not so bad.

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          • #6
            Police Academy

            Virtually all State Police, and many City/County Police agencies have a live-in, military style Academy. They can vary in length from 12-14 weeks to 26 weeks or more. Additionally, many departments now require a Recruit Officer to successfully complete an FTO Program which can run anywhere from 3-4 weeks to as long as six months. Believe it or not, some agencies require an even longer FTO program. Subjects taught at an Academy are generally of a law enforcement nature. They will include, but are not limited to Criminal/Traffic Law,Constitutional Law. Crime Scene Preservation, Accident Investigation, Pursuit Driving, firearms and more. PT is very much in the regimen of State Police and again, many City/County Departments. No Academy is a place for "makeup" work in English, Math, or related subjects. The study habits you hopefully aquired in grammar school, high school, and college, will be neccesary once more. These habits, will either assist you, or hinder you in the Academy depending on whether you developed them or not. This will be true whether or not the Academy you attend is the "Boot-Camp" type, or the more laid back community college academies.

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            • #7
              Edit: I still have 2 weeks before I can post in here.
              Last edited by S.O.444; 04-23-2007, 05:53 PM. Reason: wrong forum

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              • #8
                When I went through the academy in 2001, in Ohio, the atmosphere was very relxed. There was no required PT, you just had to show some improvement. Now there is mandatory PT stuff. Most of the time we did classroom work, alot of writing. Toward the end of the academy was more hands on, which we all enjoyed. There is a reason for all the classroom stuff though. Our academy was 555 hours. If you really want to go into LE, the time is worth it.
                "In each of us, two natures are at war...the good and the evil. All our lives the fight goes on between them, but one of them must conquer. In our own hands lies the power to choose. What we want most to be we are." Dr. Henry Jekyll

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                • #9
                  Mine was 760 hours, Monday-Friday 0800-1700 with some Saturdays and Sundays. It was a community college setting, however we did have drill instructors and Pt for the first few weeks.

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                  • #10
                    My agency sent us to a regional academy after being hired. It was 800 hrs, Hybrid Community College-ROTC (just enough BS to make us laugh) environment. Classes were held Mon-Fri 8-5pm, non residential. We had PT 2-3 times a week with a lot of running wearing the duty belt. Academics classes covered the state and federal laws, No homework, 1-2 tests a week.
                    After graduation my agency put us through another 200 hrs in house which covered local ordinances, polices, etc. Work days were much of the same, with much more intense PT.

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                    • #11
                      I attended both a college type setting, and a para-military setting. I actually learned more at the paramilitary one due to the fact that i felt like i was earning the job more then just getting a job.
                      The Republicans need to shrug off this Christian Coalition noose it has placed around its own neck and recognize the fact that, though they may not realize it, the majority of Americans are actually quite libertarian in their philosophy. They also need to learn to fight once in a while. What a bunch of wimps.
                      -Neal Boortz

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                      • #12
                        Ours was run like this.

                        Normally, we would get up around 8am. We always had time to read the paper, grab some coffee and a light breakfast before a morning exercize class. Then, we would shower and prepare for classes, which started at 9am.

                        The classes weren't too hard. I usually just finished the paper, did the crossword puzzle and noshed a bit during classes. Then of course, was lunch. A nice assortment of freshly squeezed juices, deli sandwiches, at least one, usually two soups, and a hot entree to choose from too. If you didn't linger over lunch, there was time to take a short nap before the afternoon classes. I'd would usually skip at least one class so that I could make some phone calls, check my e-mail, surf the internet, and monitor my investments.

                        In the evening, some of us would play basketball, workout, watch a movie, etc. Wednesday was always pizza night for us. We would all get together and watch NYPD Blue together. On those nights we worked out, you could finish up with a nice refreshing massage or steam.

                        Normally, we would finish the day with a cocktail or two. Then back at it the next day. It really got to be a grind.
                        You can now follow me on twitter.

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                        • #13
                          So. Fla: Virtually 100% instructional. The only physical activity while in the academy was during PT. You had to do all your running/lifting either before or after class (which was 8:00-5:00). I felt it was very laid back.

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                          • #14
                            I went through PTI in champaign Il back in 1996...it is MUCH different now from what i have been told. If you get hired there is a good chance you will go there. light pt in the morning, classroom, lots of hands on practicals. You stay in the college apartments across the street from the training academy. When i was there it was party central, and we were the source of most of it (i was 22 at the time) But it is much stricter 11 years later.
                            "I am... reminded of something Cardinal Wolsey once told me. That I should only ever tell the king what he ought to do, not what he could do; for if the lion knows his own strength, no man could control him". Sir Thomas More

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