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Can you just pay to get into the Police Academy?

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  • Can you just pay to get into the Police Academy?

    Hi everyone I was wondering if you can't get into a police Academy such as the NYPD by passing the NYPD civil service exam could you still enter it through another way? I mean can you just pay money to enter it? Thanks!

  • #2
    Some states allow self sponsor in a regional college type academy and some don't. But I don't know of any, in house academies like NYPD that does take self sponsors.

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    • #3
      It's not just the test itself but also other exams that I would need to pass in order to become an NYPD cop. I have an issue with visual impairment and require the use of a cane to help me get around. Could I still become a police officer but just work at a desk?

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      • #4
        No, you would need to be able to function with full mobility and full visual acuity. You could apply in a civilian position at the Department though and they are usually less stringent than hiring as a police officer.
        USAF VETERAN 2004-2012
        "The sheep pretend the wolf will never come, but the sheepdog lives for that day."-LTC Grossman
        DA Public Safety Dispatcher, APG MD

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        • #5
          But I don't understand there are police officers who get hurt and are put on desk duty?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by NickM View Post
            But I don't understand there are police officers who get hurt and are put on desk duty?
            That is after they are already officers

            Also MANY officers who get hurt are then put on disability retirement rather than working a desk

            . Its a big deal to be able to do any job in the department when you get hired. There are a list of "essential duties that an officer must meet to be hired........if are not able to meet those duties NO agency is going to hire you

            Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

            My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

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            • #7
              I got hurt on duty and they put me on the desk until the severity was figured out, but ones that do get desk duty usually don't do it permanently, if they can't heal they are normally medically retired. I work for the Feds so after a while an opportunity to move out of LE came up and I went to Dispatch.
              USAF VETERAN 2004-2012
              "The sheep pretend the wolf will never come, but the sheepdog lives for that day."-LTC Grossman
              DA Public Safety Dispatcher, APG MD

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              • #8
                Originally posted by NickM View Post
                But I don't understand there are police officers who get hurt and are put on desk duty?
                As Iowa stated, most officers who are seriously/permanently injured are going to have to retire or resign. A "desk job" is typically only a temporary option for on duty injuries...unless there happens to be an administrative opening that the officer qualifies for (a lot of stars would have to align for this to happen). If an officer gets injured OFF duty then they're even worse off.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by NickM View Post
                  But I don't understand there are police officers who get hurt and are put on desk duty?
                  Where I'm at, it used to be the policy of large departments that if an officer was injured on duty to the point that he could not perform the full functions of his position, he was offered the option of taking a disability retirement or moving to what was deemed a permanent light duty job. It was thought that in a large agency they could find enough positions requiring peace officer status but not full physical capacity, to meet that need. However, those programs were discontinued as over the years, so many officers suffered injuries of that nature that departments were becoming overwhelmed, and disabled officers were threatening to outnumber fully able personnel.

                  Now, limited capacity officers are placed on light duty until their situation becomes permanent and stable (usually with a few months). If they are able to return to full duty they do so. If not, they are usually offered several options:

                  1. Take a disability retirement.
                  2. Transfer to a non-police position that is within their limited capabilities.
                  3. Demote to a non police position that is within they limited capabilities.
                  4. Go into vocational rehabilitation, then take option 1.
                  5. Resign.

                  In this new day and age of public expectations and lawsuits, there are several other reasons for not hiring someone who is incapable of performing the required physical tasks of the job. First, the public has certain reasonable expectations of us in providing service. If someone is injured or dies because we knowingly hired an applicant who is incapable of performing wll the physical tasks of the job, we will be faced with defending against a lawsuit for negligent hiring. Not only will that be difficult, but it undermined public confidence in us, when people believe we intentionally hire unqualified staff. Then comes workers compensation and disability retirement issues.

                  Disabled people tend to have conditions or injuries that are prone to reinjury. Even though theirs may be a pre-exiting condition/injury, the employer will be liable not only for any reinjury that occurs on the job, but depending on your state law, may be liable to pay lifetime medical for that condition if it is reinjured on the job. Hiring someone under those circumstances is fiscally irresponsible.

                  Then comes the issue of disability retirement. Let's assume you hire someone who has a condition that would already qualify for a disability retirement. They get injured on the job exacerbating their existing condition and file for disability retirement. Do you grant it when they never should have been hired with this condition in the first place?

                  Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

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                  • #10
                    On the federal side...If you are disabled/injured and you are physically unable to meet the requirements of the job and the condition is expected to last more than a year. There are two options for the agency...

                    1 - The Service can accommodate the individual in a position with the same grade or pay in the same commuting area.

                    or

                    2 - The Service cama medically retire the individual.
                    “There’s a fine line between fishing and just standing on the shore like an idiot.” - Steven Wright

                    US Army MP (95B) 1992-1997
                    DOJ Agent/ DHS Officer 1997 to Present

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                    • #11
                      No agency is going to hire someone who is essentially blind to be a police officer. An officer’s duties includes observing people and activity, as well as being armed, and if you can’t clearly identify the target and surroundings, you aren’t safe to carry a gun. Even an officer on light duty might have to leave the desk and engage.
                      Government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem. - Ronald Reagan

                      I don't think It'll happen in the US because we don't trust our government. We are a country of skeptics, raised by skeptics, founded by skeptics. - Amaroq

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                      • #12
                        In my state it is possible to pay your own way through an academy, most of which are run by local community colleges. Probably half of all academy students self-sponsor, based on my experience. In fact, that's how I got my start.

                        BUT

                        All academies require attendees pass state-mandated minimum physical standards. These aren't super- challenging, but being essentially blind is pretty much going to be a non-starter.

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                        • #13
                          You need to be able to drive and pass firearms testing.

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                          • #14
                            Couldn't there be an exception to policy? I mean if you can show that you can provide a clear and valid service than couldn't that be overlooked?

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                            • #15
                              I mean if the government is going to let transgender people join the Military than I don't see why I couldn't be allowed to do something in law enforcement.

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