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Can a cop from accross the state cite you?

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  • aftermath
    replied
    I believe here in Illinois, an officer, under an agreement with the area he/she works for and the surrounding municipalities, has arrest powers in all those areas for the simple reason that if he/she pulls someone over on the border or must pursue someone, the stop is held as legal and no toes get stepped on. If they want to be real official about it, they pursue and notify the municipality they entered incase they need local backup or just want to turn it over to them.

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  • P.I.Davis
    replied
    IN Maryland as a Certified Police Officer as long as your general orders are OK with it all police officers in MD have state wide authority with the exception of Traffic enforcement. I can only cite someone for a traffic violation that occured in my city.

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  • warrior1978
    replied
    From Michigan Law

    764.2a Peace officer; exercise of authority in other county, city, village, township, or university; violation involving water vessel.

    Sec. 2a.

    (1) A peace officer of a county, city, village, township, or university of this state may exercise the authority and powers of a peace officer outside the geographical boundaries of the officer's county, city, village, township, or university under any of the following circumstances:

    (a) If the officer is enforcing the laws of this state in conjunction with the Michigan state police.

    (b) If the officer is enforcing the laws of this state in conjunction with a peace officer of any other county, city, village, township, or university in which the officer may be.

    (c) If the officer has witnessed an individual violate any of the following within the geographical boundaries of the officer's county, city, village, township, or university and immediately pursues the individual outside of the geographical boundaries of the officer's county, city, village, township, or university:

    (i) A state law or administrative rule.

    (ii) A local ordinance.

    (iii) A state law, administrative rule, or local ordinance, the violation of which is a civil infraction, municipal civil infraction, or state civil infraction.

    (2) The officer pursuing an individual under subsection (1)(c) may stop and detain the person outside the geographical boundaries of the officer's county, city, village, township, or university for the purpose of enforcing that law, administrative rule, or ordinance or enforcing any other law, administrative rule, or ordinance before, during, or immediately after the detaining of the individual. If the violation or pursuit involves a vessel moving on the waters of this state, the officer pursuing the individual may direct the operator of the vessel to bring the vessel to a stop or maneuver it in a manner that permits the officer to come beside the vessel.

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  • ToppDogg163
    replied
    MCOLES certification does not give you statewide police powers.

    Michigan cops have their law enforcement powers under the authority of the jurisdiction where they work. Again, like other states, if you are "deputized" by the county or neighboring city you have police powers there as well.

    JB

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  • AlabamaCop
    replied
    Originally posted by PhilipCal
    Alabama Cop, every Law Enforcement Officer in Alabama is required to be APOST certified within nine months of appointment as a peace officer. Consult your Code of Alabama regarding jurisdictional limits for Municipal Peace Officers and Sheriff's Deputies. Believe me, I'd have absolutely no problem with the scenario you suggest. For the present though, it's as i described it.
    Actually, per rule 650-X-2-.01, an officer must be certified within six months of appointment. Alot of the rules regarding APOSTC have changed in recent years. Also, I have searched the Code of Alabama and can't find the law you're talking about. I have never seen any law on this, but I was tought by the academy, supervisors and instructors that any officer in the state, once certified, has statewide arrest powers. They may have taught you differently at the state trooper academy, but that's what they're teaching at the state law enforcement academies. We are taught that the jurisdiction is just the jurisdiction of the courts and that officers have statewide powers. Also, as many have said, if I did make a traffic stop or arrest on the other side of the state, there better have been no other choice and someone better have been in danger, otherwise, I probably wouldn't have a job when I got back.

    Like I said, I have never seen any law on this first hand so I could be wrong, but this is the way I have been told. If you are right, I know several officers that have violated this law without anything being said to them about it.

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  • Fuzz
    replied
    Originally posted by OverCharged
    in arizona we may all have state wide jurisdiction but its against about everyones policy to write outside work hours and obvious your work area.

    I have phx tickets and i would love to write some of these fools who live near me on there atv's on the residential roads but i would get fired

    also my tickets dont work in other cities or so i would imagine.
    Our tickets have each of the courthouses in the county listed and you just pick the one closest to where you are at. There is also a space to write inanother courthouse location. If I am out of my own county then I simply ask dispatch for the "county seat" location for where I am at and write that in. I very rarely stop anybody out of the county, but if they are stupid enough they are going to get stopped.

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  • OverCharged
    replied
    in arizona we may all have state wide jurisdiction but its against about everyones policy to write outside work hours and obvious your work area.

    I have phx tickets and i would love to write some of these fools who live near me on there atv's on the residential roads but i would get fired

    also my tickets dont work in other cities or so i would imagine.

    Leave a comment:


  • j706
    replied
    In Indiana a police officer is just that, a police officer. I can write a ticket or make an arrest anywhere in the state with out restiction. Now there are some problems with this like where do you write a ticket to ect. Plus I would feel kinda akward doing so if I was very far from home.

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  • ateamer
    replied
    As is posted above, California officers have jurisdiction statewide. A CHP officer who used to be stationed in this county had to come back for court one day. He came down on duty, and wrote traffic cites in each of the eight counties through which he passed on the way down.

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  • t150vsuptpr
    replied
    Originally posted by michiganDT
    I was on the freeway today in Michigan and a cop from a city at least a few counties away (city cop, not county or state) was rolling down the freeway. Everyone was kind of flanked behind him afraid to pass. In Michigan at least, where local police do not have statewide powers, can they pull someone over for speeding if they are well out of their jurisdiction?
    It totally depends on your state's laws.

    Being certified state wide just means you can get a job and carry your LEO certification with you to other places in the state, so you don't have to go through school again. States do this so that there is some consistancy in how law is enforced.

    Having statewide powers of arrest is a totally different issue. Being state certified does not necessarily empower one with state wide powers of arrest.

    Check your own state's laws.


    Leave a comment:


  • PhilipCal
    replied
    Alabama Cop, every Law Enforcement Officer in Alabama is required to be APOST certified within nine months of appointment as a peace officer. Consult your Code of Alabama regarding jurisdictional limits for Municipal Peace Officers and Sheriff's Deputies. Believe me, I'd have absolutely no problem with the scenario you suggest. For the present though, it's as i described it.

    Leave a comment:


  • kentreserve45
    replied
    I'm just a reserve in Michigan. I think being MCOLES certified gives you statewide police powers but you have hell to pay if you were a Grand Rapids Cop (West side of state) and pulled someone over in Detroit(East side of state). If any full time guys know please let us know cause I'm curious

    Leave a comment:


  • AlabamaCop
    replied
    Originally posted by PhilipCal
    In Alabama a municipal officer is limited to the county his city is in. A Deputy Sheriff is limited to his county, unless either is in fresh pursuit. In that case, an arrest by those officers can be made anywhere in the state.
    In Alabama, an APOSTC certified officer has police powers anywhere in the state. The only thing that being in fresh pursuit changes is which court to run the charges through. If I stop a car or make an arrest on the other side of the state, I have to run it through that jurisdictions court system. If I chase someone out of my jurisdiction, I can run everything through my court system, even though some of the offenses happened in other jurisdictions.
    Last edited by AlabamaCop; 04-15-2007, 04:56 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • PhilipCal
    replied
    Cop from accross the state.

    In Alabama a municipal officer is limited to the county his city is in. A Deputy Sheriff is limited to his county, unless either is in fresh pursuit. In that case, an arrest by those officers can be made anywhere in the state.

    Leave a comment:


  • Fuzz
    replied
    Jurisdiction for California is statewide. Ive had a couple of people blow by me and swear up and down that I could not give them a ticket because I was just a "city cop" and I was out of my jurisdiction. They kept saying that all the way up to the point where I told them to sign the ticket or get put in handcuffs. Never had one of them show up in court .....must have looked it up and realized they were wrong. Other states jurisdiction can end at city/county line unless it is an emergency. Some states I have heard have agreements between agencies where jurisdiction is extended to multiple areas. Hopefully someone from Michigan can clarify this for your area.

    Leave a comment:

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