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  • Annoying Ride Along

    Has anyone ever had a really weird or annoying ride along? Share your story~
    Smile and Wait for Flash

  • #2
    Awhile back, I had a kid that I swear to God had come on to this forum, looked up what not to do on a ride-along, then did everyone of them. He kept trying to push the light and siren buttons, constantly pointed out cars that he thought should be pulled over, complained that I made him pay for his coffee at break time and (this was the deal breaker) wouldn't stay in the car when he was told to. As soon as that stop cleared, it was a one way trip back to the station and a swift "Good bye."
    \

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by SRT936
      Awhile back, I had a kid that I swear to God had come on to this forum, looked up what not to do on a ride-along, then did everyone of them. He kept trying to push the light and siren buttons, constantly pointed out cars that he thought should be pulled over, complained that I made him pay for his coffee at break time and (this was the deal breaker) wouldn't stay in the car when he was told to. As soon as that stop cleared, it was a one way trip back to the station and a swift "Good bye."
      LOL!!! Thats what he gets for being a little smart ***!!

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by WILDWDTOUR
        Has anyone ever had a really weird or annoying ride along? Share your story~
        Unlike so many people I ran into, I can still recall this one's name, which I will withhold from this telling. Let's call him Steve. I frequently got ride-alongs, because they were supposed to go to FTOs, and I usually didn't mind having them. Steve showed up displaying the eagerness of a Golden Retriever who sees what he believes is the last stick remaining on Earth. He had recently discovered that the local highway patrol office sold logo items to the public that bore the emblem of the highway patrol association, which included a prominent badge. I think he bought at least one of everything they had, and he was wearing most of these items - hat, shirt, sweatshirt. The first thing I told him was to lose or cover up the emblems. He was disappointed, but complied.

        Before we had left the motor pool, he went into a nearly incoherent, stream-of-consciousness monologue about how much he wanted to become a police officer and how a good police officer never had to use his gun and when he became a police officer he knew he would never shoot anyone because a good police officer never has to do that. I replied that I had shot someone about a year before, so I must not be any good at this. That made him backpedal for a a few seconds, but no longer than that. He then started up on some new topic, but it was even less comprehensible than the first one.

        My first stop of the evening was an on-sight shouting match concerning a fender bender that had taken place in a parking lot. The lot was a popular place for the teenage cruisers to hang out and wait for the next fight to start. I advised dispatch what I was up to, got out of the car, and asked one of the parties for their driver's license, registration, and proof of insurance. Before I could collect these items, Steve was on the other driver, saying in his lowest, most authoritative tone, "license registration and insurance - now." I told him to get back in the car and to stay there. When I gathered the documents and was starting to fill out the accident form, dispatch called me and asked if I could secure for another call. I replied that I was kind of busy and asked what they needed me for. The reply was "We have a an in-progress report of shots fired at the Dairy Queen." The Dairy Queen was two blocks away. I told the drivers that they were on their own and to go to the PD front desk, gave them their stuff, and jumped into the car. Lights and sirens time, I'm headed up the street.

        During this brief transit, Steve took it upon himself to lock the upright shotgun rack, so that the shotgun could be removed only with a key (I left it unlocked unless I was out of sight of the car). Since I anticipated that the shotgun, now denied me for the short haul, might otherwise be a highly viable option in the next ten seconds or so, I felt it necessary to make inquiry into Steve's rationale. I was under a bit of stress at the time, and the siren made things kind of noisy, but I believe this inquiry was made at the most considerable volume I was capable of uttering, and was phrased along the lines of "WHAT THE (expletive deleted) ARE YOU DOING??!!" The response was some babbling that I neither heard, understood, nor cared about understanding.

        By this time, we had arrived at the DQ, and sure enough, a young malefactor was standing in the parking lot, firing rounds into the air from a 9mm semi-auto . My appearance caused him to go into track star mode, something that might have been curtailed had I been able to deploy my trusty Remington 870. One of my colleagues managed to get the shooter (he didn't hit anything we ever found out about), but we never did find the gun.

        Before I left the car to search for the gun, using as much restraint as I was able to muster, I told Steve to sit there, not touch anything whatsoever, not to exit the car for any reason, not to speak a word, and that any discussion on the issue would commence only after I had hog tied him and locked him in the trunk. I took the car keys with me. With hindsight, I think this was a good decision.

        When the area had been searched, I told my sergeant what had transpired, and that I was divesting myself of Steve as soon as I could get back to the station. The sergeant supported me completely, and asked only that I write a memo explaining what had happened.

        On arrival at the station, to my amazement, Steve asked me if he could ride with me again some other time. I told him that the only way he would see the inside of my patrol car again was from inside the prisoner cage, and while wearing handcuffs.

        I have a couple of other ride-along stories, but that was the best one.
        Tim Dees, now writing as a plain old forum member, his superpowers lost to an encounter with gold kryptonite.

        Comment


        • #5
          ya know a good way to pass off a rider?

          sit and do paper work for as long as possible. sooner or later he'll get bored enough to switch out to someone else or leave.
          -Stay safe

          Comment


          • #6
            Woooowwww Tim Dees, that's brutal! It makes ya wonder how slow a person can be to catch on eh?
            I felt I was cooperative and well-behaved on my ride along
            --"To give anything less than your best is to sacrifice the gift."
            --"Run XC"

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            • #7
              Every civilian ride along I have ever had has been weird and annoying. Can't stand 'em. I am never quite sure what their intention/motivations are, most of the time it seems like they are just looking for a cheap thrill and or a chance to air their long held gripes against police in general.

              The only ride alongs I gladly take are our department Explorers or civilian employees. It's my job to deal with weird and annoying(or worse) people, the last thing I want is one sitting next to me in my squad.

              Comment


              • #8
                This all doesn’t surprise me; I’m sure there are lots of mental people out there that want to experience the cops and robbers thrill. There should be some kind of question air testing before being aloud to do a ride along.

                I'm scheduled for a night shift ride along on Friday I'm in it for my strong interest in pursuing the career. What do you guys think would be a good way to break the ice with the leo? Would you be offended if I brought doughnuts I’m thinking energy drinks and lots of grub. Thanks in advance to those who reply. Elliott

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Bjarne
                  I'm scheduled for a night shift ride along on Friday I'm in it for my strong interest in pursuing the career. What do you guys think would be a good way to break the ice with the leo? Would you be offended if I brought doughnuts I’m thinking energy drinks and lots of grub. Thanks in advance to those who reply. Elliott
                  Ya, maybe donuts are not such a good idea. It might give them the idea that you are stereotyping police and the job right out of the gate.

                  I think the best way to "break the ice" is to talk about something outside of police work. Maybe notice that he/she is wearing a wedding ring, and ask how long they've been married and ask about the kids. See if they saw the latest big game and talk about that for a bit.

                  Don't start asking about all kinds of "exciting" aspects of police work (shot somebody? Drawn gun? Lights and sirens blah blah...??) You'll probably be curious about this, but asking about these things all the time (and especially right off at the start) might make your officer think your just a wannabe that thinks police work is all fun and exciting.

                  When they make a traffic stop or take a call, ask where they want you. Maybe they want you to sit in the car, maybe they will let you get out and stand in the doorway of the car, maybe they will let you follow them around while they take the report. Just ask first.
                  Last edited by Sabre; 04-05-2007, 12:48 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Could there be a difference between city/county/state leo's as far as ride-along experiences? I rode with two city depts. and one county and the deputy from the county dept. was shining like a brand new penny! The experience was awsome and he seemed upbeat the whole shift! Made my decision to pursue the county dept. alot easier. I can't imagine doing some of things talked about on here....I got the slight impression that if I touched anything except in the event that he was gettting beat down, he would bash my head against the dash and then throw me in jail...other than that the expeirence was very pleasent!
                    "When I came home, people often asked me about Iraq, and mostly I told them it wasn't so bad. I didn't know how to explain myself to them. The war really wasn't so bad. Yes, there were bombs and shootings and nervous times, but that was just the job. In fact, going to war is rather easy. You react to situations around you and try not to die. There are no electric bills or car payments or chores around the house. Just go to work, come home alive, and do it again tomorrow." - Brian Mockenhaupt

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Wow, Tim Dees! Funny story. Glad it didn't happen to me and I'm glad it had a happy ending

                      I don't mind ride-alongs. However, at some point in time I become weary of certain ride-alongs who want to come early and often, and fill my time with discourse regarding their life experience and helpful suggestions regarding how I should handle the case, how I should have handled the LAST case, or how I ought to handle the next situation that may arise.

                      Any lurkers wanting to ride-along, listen carefully. Officers don't mind taking you and in fact, many of us recognize it as our civic duty to assuage the curiosity of citizens or potential cadets. However, when on the ride-along, ALWAYS do EXACTLY as you are told and listen with your EARS, not your mouth.
                      He who fights with monsters should look to it that he himself does not become a monster. And when you gaze long into an abyss the abyss also gazes into you.
                      -- Nietzsche

                      Certainly there is no hunting like the hunting of man and those who have hunted armed men long enough and liked it, never really care for anything else thereafter.
                      -- Hemingway

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Tim Dees
                        Unlike so many people I ran into, I can still recall this one's name, which I will withhold from this telling. Let's call him Steve. I frequently got ride-alongs, because they were supposed to go to FTOs, and I usually didn't mind having them. Steve showed up displaying the eagerness of a Golden Retriever who sees what he believes is the last stick remaining on Earth. He had recently discovered that the local highway patrol office sold logo items to the public that bore the emblem of the highway patrol association, which included a prominent badge. I think he bought at least one of everything they had, and he was wearing most of these items - hat, shirt, sweatshirt. The first thing I told him was to lose or cover up the emblems. He was disappointed, but complied.

                        Before we had left the motor pool, he went into a nearly incoherent, stream-of-consciousness monologue about how much he wanted to become a police officer and how a good police officer never had to use his gun and when he became a police officer he knew he would never shoot anyone because a good police officer never has to do that. I replied that I had shot someone about a year before, so I must not be any good at this. That made him backpedal for a a few seconds, but no longer than that. He then started up on some new topic, but it was even less comprehensible than the first one.

                        My first stop of the evening was an on-sight shouting match concerning a fender bender that had taken place in a parking lot. The lot was a popular place for the teenage cruisers to hang out and wait for the next fight to start. I advised dispatch what I was up to, got out of the car, and asked one of the parties for their driver's license, registration, and proof of insurance. Before I could collect these items, Steve was on the other driver, saying in his lowest, most authoritative tone, "license registration and insurance - now." I told him to get back in the car and to stay there. When I gathered the documents and was starting to fill out the accident form, dispatch called me and asked if I could secure for another call. I replied that I was kind of busy and asked what they needed me for. The reply was "We have a an in-progress report of shots fired at the Dairy Queen." The Dairy Queen was two blocks away. I told the drivers that they were on their own and to go to the PD front desk, gave them their stuff, and jumped into the car. Lights and sirens time, I'm headed up the street.

                        During this brief transit, Steve took it upon himself to lock the upright shotgun rack, so that the shotgun could be removed only with a key (I left it unlocked unless I was out of sight of the car). Since I anticipated that the shotgun, now denied me for the short haul, might otherwise be a highly viable option in the next ten seconds or so, I felt it necessary to make inquiry into Steve's rationale. I was under a bit of stress at the time, and the siren made things kind of noisy, but I believe this inquiry was made at the most considerable volume I was capable of uttering, and was phrased along the lines of "WHAT THE (expletive deleted) ARE YOU DOING??!!" The response was some babbling that I neither heard, understood, nor cared about understanding.

                        By this time, we had arrived at the DQ, and sure enough, a young malefactor was standing in the parking lot, firing rounds into the air from a 9mm semi-auto . My appearance caused him to go into track star mode, something that might have been curtailed had I been able to deploy my trusty Remington 870. One of my colleagues managed to get the shooter (he didn't hit anything we ever found out about), but we never did find the gun.

                        Before I left the car to search for the gun, using as much restraint as I was able to muster, I told Steve to sit there, not touch anything whatsoever, not to exit the car for any reason, not to speak a word, and that any discussion on the issue would commence only after I had hog tied him and locked him in the trunk. I took the car keys with me. With hindsight, I think this was a good decision.

                        When the area had been searched, I told my sergeant what had transpired, and that I was divesting myself of Steve as soon as I could get back to the station. The sergeant supported me completely, and asked only that I write a memo explaining what had happened.

                        On arrival at the station, to my amazement, Steve asked me if he could ride with me again some other time. I told him that the only way he would see the inside of my patrol car again was from inside the prisoner cage, and while wearing handcuffs.

                        I have a couple of other ride-along stories, but that was the best one.
                        I think I would had about croaked!.... I'm thankful my agency doesn't have any ride-alongs.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by SRT936
                          Awhile back, I had a kid that I swear to God had come on to this forum, looked up what not to do on a ride-along, then did everyone of them. He kept trying to push the light and siren buttons, constantly pointed out cars that he thought should be pulled over, complained that I made him pay for his coffee at break time and (this was the deal breaker) wouldn't stay in the car when he was told to. As soon as that stop cleared, it was a one way trip back to the station and a swift "Good bye."

                          You had him too? I guess he's making his rounds

                          Had a good laugh over yours Tim. Thank god it wasn't me, I probably would have had a stroke.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I had one that was part of some type of internship for her college. This girl started running her mouth asking questions by starting conversations with me like "So do you drug dealers are really criminals or just poor products of their society? It then escolated to her saying some left wing garbage like "George Bush was in on 911" and I turned the Car around pulled up to HQ and told her to GET OUT!! Then I wrote the administrator in her pervue a letter about basically what a anti-cop anti-american left wing nut job she was and how I refused for her to ever ride in my car again. And I never saw her again....
                            "Some people spend an entire lifetime wondering if they made a difference in the world. The MARINES don't have that problem." ....Ronald Reagan

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                            • #15
                              I always have the same converstion before we leave hq. You can get out and observe UNLESS I TELL YOU NOT TO. Dont talk to anyone. Don't answer anyones' questions, I'll answer for you. Ask ME all the questions you want. Dont push/touch/press/etc. ANYTHING. Dont get invlovled in anything you see tonight unless I'm getting my butt kicked, no one else is around and I ask you to.

                              Never have had a bad ridealong.

                              P.S

                              I was handed a ridealong assignment form one time. I noticed that the wanted persons box had not been checked. I ran the wanted persons check thru NCIC myself. Turns out this guy had a 49 page rap sheet. Needless to say I told dispatch to phone this guy and tell him to not bother showing up that night.
                              John 3:16

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