Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

LE - Job or Lifestyle?

Collapse

300x250 Mobile

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • LE - Job or Lifestyle?

    I recently went through my city's Citizens' Police Academy. It was a real eye-opener and a great experience. Between the program and visiting this forum, I've sensed some consider LE a job and others a way of life. I'm curious on this - is this just a job? Or is LE a lifestyle? After your shift, do you walk away and not think about it? Or does LE affect your life at home as well? I'm a civilian, I've worked for the same place for over 20 years, and I know for me personally, my job spills over into my personal life all the time...but then again, I have chosen to allow this. What about you? A job? Or a lifestyle? And when you're off duty and someone begins asking you LE stuff, do you mind?

  • #2
    Originally posted by tazbird3
    I recently went through my city's Citizens' Police Academy. It was a real eye-opener and a great experience. Between the program and visiting this forum, I've sensed some consider LE a job and others a way of life. I'm curious on this - is this just a job? Or is LE a lifestyle? After your shift, do you walk away and not think about it? Or does LE affect your life at home as well? I'm a civilian, I've worked for the same place for over 20 years, and I know for me personally, my job spills over into my personal life all the time...but then again, I have chosen to allow this. What about you? A job? Or a lifestyle? And when you're off duty and someone begins asking you LE stuff, do you mind?

    It's a lifestyle. I don't think about work when I'm not at work. I'm always ready for whatever comes my way off duty (heart attack victim, car accident, a nut with a gun). I don't mind answering questions about LE stuff, hell, I probably wouldn't hear from half my family/friends as much as I do if I did ... : )

    Comment


    • #3
      Any job is a lifestyle. Simple repetition at work has an effect on how you'd do that same thing while not a work, right? For example, when I was a cashier in high school, I would find myself facing the bills before putting them in my wallet because I got used to doing it at work. So, to some degree, what we do regularly at work has an underlying effect on what we do outside of work. We're all creatures of habit.

      The same can be said for LE. As a LEO I now deal with and see people in a particular way. I walk with a certain gait that comes from wearing the equipment I do on an average day. I'm unconsciously observant of what's going on around me. It's all become engrained because I've done it so much at work. It's unusual for the general public, however, because the things I do and the way I do them are not natural for the average citizen.

      So, in many way, our job is no more our lifestyle than Joe Citizen's. It's just more noticable because our habits are alien to most people.
      Last edited by Bing_Oh; 04-03-2007, 01:45 AM.
      "He who fights with monsters might take care lest he thereby become a monster. And if you gaze for long into an abyss, the abyss gazes also into you."
      -Friedrich Nietzsche

      Comment


      • #4
        It's all become engrained because I've done it so much at work. It's unusual for the general public, however, because the things I do and the way I do them are not natural for the average citizen.

        So, in many way, our job is no more our lifestyle than Joe Citizen's. It's just more noticable because our habits are alien to most people.

        You hit the nail on the head. I find myself doing little things such as, if I'm at a restaurant with the little lady, I'll never sit with my back to the door; I'll always immediately scan a room upon entering it to see who and what's in it; I'm always watching people's hands. Just little stuff like that, that I do sub-consciencly.
        -Stay safe

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Bing_Oh
          Any job is a lifestyle. Simple repetition at work has an effect on how you'd do that same thing while not a work, right? For example, when I was a cashier in high school, I would find myself facing the bills before putting them in my wallet because I got used to doing it at work. So, to some degree, what we do regularly at work has an underlying effect on what we do outside of work. We're all creatures of habit.

          The same can be said for LE. As a LEO I now deal with and see people in a particular way. I walk with a certain gait that comes from wearing the equipment I do on an average day. I'm unconsciously observant of what's going on around me. It's all become engrained because I've done it so much at work. It's unusual for the general public, however, because the things I do and the way I do them are not natural for the average citizen.

          So, in many way, our job is no more our lifestyle than Joe Citizen's. It's just more noticable because our habits are alien to most people.
          Mop boy at the local peep show? Thats not a life style.

          Police work is a life style. Its who we are, not what we do. We do have to find a way to leave work at work and home at home. that can sometimes be the hard part for a lot of people.
          It takes a Wolf.......

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Irishluck31
            Mop boy at the local peep show? Thats not a life style.

            Police work is a life style. Its who we are, not what we do. We do have to find a way to leave work at work and home at home. that can sometimes be the hard part for a lot of people.
            I agree. It's a lifestyle
            John 3:16

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by J_Mann
              You hit the nail on the head. I find myself doing little things such as, if I'm at a restaurant with the little lady, I'll never sit with my back to the door; I'll always immediately scan a room upon entering it to see who and what's in it; I'm always watching people's hands. Just little stuff like that, that I do sub-consciencly.
              Agreed...it's a lifestyle. We all try to leave work at work, but that's easier said than done. I'm a Probation Officer in a rural Nor Cal county. I try my best to forget about work off-duty, but that changes quickly when you're out and about running into felons that you've hooked. I can't count how many times I've been out with my wife or just fishing by myself and I come across one of my felons. I'm always armed off-duty, but that never changes the cautious mind-set. Like you, I always find myself scanning rooms, sitting in the back of restaurants facing the door, etc. It's not paranoia, it's the reality of what we do. Another reason why treating people with respect is so important. We have a little motto in our Probation Department, "Hook and Book With Respect...Payback is a Bitch". Be safe!

              Comment


              • #8
                Based on what we do everyday as an LEO it becomes a lifestyle. That lifestyle is also what can cause our suicide rates to be higher(I believe CHP has had this flare up again), our personal lives are altered because people often know we are cops, we (on average) die at an earlier age then other professions, we have a higher rate of heart attack/heart conditions,and so on.

                Comment


                • #9
                  It's a lifestyle. It's also a blessing and a curse.
                  I've lost out on loads of opportunities meeting women because there are certain situations I just can't be around (ie-bars where I know shaddy stuff is going down, parties with people I don't know etc...).

                  It ends up defining who you are...you are not "Timmy" you are "the Cop". I try to break it up by getting more into my hobbies, but work tends to get in the way .

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    You know me - I just have to inject the real deal.

                    If we are smart, we treat or profession as a job. We leave the job in the car or at the station. We try as hard as we can against great odds, to live as "normal" a lifestyle as possible.

                    The minute we think it is our "life" or "lifestyle" we forget the 99% of the rest of the world we live with. They do not / cannot understand our work, so if we ar =e to be a part of our community, we, must try to be part of the 99% when we can.

                    You can watch your back without the "alwaqys sit with your back to the wall" thing; you can.

                    If you define yourself as what you do, as opposed to who you are, folks will never get to know all of you. You will just be "the cop" and that is where the conversation will end.

                    You are not a cop who happens to live next door. You are the next door neighbor, with dogpoop, a lawn that gets weeds, a car to wash and, oh yeah, you happen to be a cop for a living.

                    Stirive to have that attitude, not the "cops and everyone else" frame of mind.

                    Hard lessons learned over a career.

                    Just my opinion folks.
                    The All New
                    2013
                    BBQ and Goldfish Pond Club
                    Sully - IAM Rand - JasperST - L1 - The Tick - EmmaPeel - Columbus - LA Dep - SgtSlaughter - OneAdam12 - Retired96 - Iowa #1603
                    - M1Garand

                    (any BBQ and Goldfish Pond member may nominate another user for membership but just remember ..... this ain't no weenie roast!)



                    Comment


                    • #11
                      you don't necessarily become the cop, so much as the cop becomes you.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by 1042 Trooper
                        You know me - I just have to inject the real deal.

                        If we are smart, we treat or profession as a job. We leave the job in the car or at the station. We try as hard as we can against great odds, to live as "normal" a lifestyle as possible.

                        The minute we think it is our "life" or "lifestyle" we forget the 99% of the rest of the world we live with. They do not / cannot understand our work, so if we ar =e to be a part of our community, we, must try to be part of the 99% when we can.

                        You can watch your back without the "always sit with your back to the wall" thing; you can.

                        If you define yourself as what you do, as opposed to who you are, folks will never get to know all of you. You will just be "the cop" and that is where the conversation will end.

                        You are not a cop who happens to live next door. You are the next door neighbor, with dogpoop, a lawn that gets weeds, a car to wash and, oh yeah, you happen to be a cop for a living.

                        Stirive to have that attitude, not the "cops and everyone else" frame of mind.

                        Hard lessons learned over a career.

                        Just my opinion folks.
                        You make an excellent point. We must strive to stay away from the "blue line." Yes, there will always be us and them. But it should never be us vs. them.

                        As far as my actions, they're just what I've become acustomed to. It's etched in stone somewhere upstairs. When I'm at home, I'm thinking "who are the red sox going to whip up on today?" or "what do i need from the grocery."

                        You are right. We should treat it as a job. But lets face it...L.E. is a way of life.

                        work to live, not live to work.
                        -Stay safe

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Excellent points for both sides. I too will always sit with my back to the wall in restaurants, always scan the room where ever I am and watch the people around me, run scenarios through my head, always, but I guess that's just the sheepdog in me, that will never change. When I'm home it's just like 1042 says I have a lawn with weeds, kids toys and whatever else finds it's way there just like my neighbors the fry cook and electrician. I believe LE is a way of life but it's not our whole life and by that I mean I'd much rather be father of the year than officer/deputy of the year.
                          "Fast is fine, but accuracy is everything!"-Wyatt Earp

                          "You never know when crazy will show up!"-Irishdep

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by irishdep
                            Excellent points for both sides. I too will always sit with my back to the wall in restaurants, always scan the room where ever I am and watch the people around me, run scenarios through my head, always, but I guess that's just the sheepdog in me, that will never change. When I'm home it's just like 1042 says I have a lawn with weeds, kids toys and whatever else finds it's way there just like my neighbors the fry cook and electrician. I believe LE is a way of life but it's not our whole life and by that I mean I'd much rather be father of the year than officer/deputy of the year.
                            There you go. You have your priorities nailed.
                            The All New
                            2013
                            BBQ and Goldfish Pond Club
                            Sully - IAM Rand - JasperST - L1 - The Tick - EmmaPeel - Columbus - LA Dep - SgtSlaughter - OneAdam12 - Retired96 - Iowa #1603
                            - M1Garand

                            (any BBQ and Goldfish Pond member may nominate another user for membership but just remember ..... this ain't no weenie roast!)



                            Comment


                            • #15
                              What Trooper said goes ditto for me but I'll add to it a little...

                              As a rookie it's "all about the job" or you should probably go sell washing machines instead.
                              After 10- 20 years you appreciate the hell out of those off days when you don't have to think about the job or take a call about the job. You learn to appreciate going fishing and just being another Joe Schmoe for the day.

                              It's kinda like the ole saying about not having a heart if you're not a liberal at 20 and not having a brain if you're not a conservative at 50.

                              Also relates somewhat to the old bull / young bull story.

                              Comment

                              MR300x250 Tablet

                              Collapse

                              What's Going On

                              Collapse

                              There are currently 6276 users online. 359 members and 5917 guests.

                              Most users ever online was 26,947 at 07:36 PM on 12-29-2019.

                              Welcome Ad

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X