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Contacting next of kin in case of unexpected death

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  • Contacting next of kin in case of unexpected death

    This has been worrying me for a long time (I live in a city where I have only one relative and he is not my emergency contact) and I figured this would be a good place to get a legitimate answer, not just speculation. My question has some subsections, though. Sorry! Lol

    If I were to be unexpectedly killed/incapacitated in an accident or something and couldn't communicate, how would police/first responders get into my phone - which is fingerprint and password protected - to find my emergency contact?
    — Once they got in, how would they determine who best to contact?
    — Is there some kinda code or ID that is universally understood by LEOs to mean "emergency contact" that I could/should label those contacts as, and if so, what is it?

  • #2
    Originally posted by bug918 View Post
    This has been worrying me for a long time (I live in a city where I have only one relative and he is not my emergency contact) and I figured this would be a good place to get a legitimate answer, not just speculation. My question has some subsections, though. Sorry! Lol

    If I were to be unexpectedly killed/incapacitated in an accident or something and couldn't communicate, how would police/first responders get into my phone - which is fingerprint and password protected - to find my emergency contact?
    — Once they got in, how would they determine who best to contact?
    — Is there some kinda code or ID that is universally understood by LEOs to mean "emergency contact" that I could/should label those contacts as, and if so, what is it?
    I would suggest you write 'In case of Emergency' the names of 2 or 3 contacts and their telephone numbers on a small piece of paper and tape it to the back of your driver's license or ID. I am a Detective and have access to a database that has listings of 'associates' and 'relatives'. It is extremely rare (usually homeless/transient) that we can't find someone to notify. I promise.

    Here, the acronym 'ICE' is recognized as 'In case of emergency.'

    You can enter ICE and whomever you want in your phone. If it comes to it, a search warrant can be obtained to get into a phone.

    As far as who is determined best to contact, unless you've written 'ICE' we would just use a hit or miss method and look at your most recent contacts or people with the same last name. It would go something like this:

    'Hello, I am Detective Zeitgeist with the ........PD. It is imperative that I get in contact with Mr. Bug918's family. Can you assist me?'

    Either they would be provided a number to be passed along to parents, or if they were willing, give me the number. If it's really bad, the local jurisdiction would be sent to their home. Usually w/ some kind of chaplain.

    Often the hospitals take care of it.
    Last edited by Zeitgeist; 08-12-2017, 07:50 PM.
    Judge me by the enemies I have made----Unknown

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    • #3
      thank you, zeitgeist! i'll do that right away. :-)

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      • #4
        You're very welcome, though I hope it is never necessary.
        Judge me by the enemies I have made----Unknown

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        • #5
          you and me both!!! but it's best to hope for the best, but be prepared for the worst. have a great rest of the weekend, zeitgeist. :-)

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          • #6
            oh, and it's ms. bug918. :-)

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            • #7
              Most smartphones have a "ICE" or "emergency contact" feature. I would recommend using it by listing names of people that can help if you did have some sort of emergency. I've also seen people (especially the elderly) have medical alert tags/bracelets/pendants, etc made up and use that. There are commercial services available that create thumb drives, QR Codes and other media to provide that info, but they charge a recurring fee to update the information and maintain it in their database. I wouldn't recommend the private companies as it would be a lot simpler to keep the info updated in the phone you're probably already carrying on a daily basis.

              Hope the info is never needed, but great to have just in case.
              Getting shot hurts! Don't under estimate the power of live ammo. A .22LR can kill you! I personally feel that it's best to avoid being shot by any caliber. Your vest may stop the bullet, but you'll still get a nice bruise or other injury to remember the experience.

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              • #8
                In addition to what has already been mentioned you can also register your info in next of kin registries.

                The Next of Kin Registry (NOKR) is a free international emergency contact service. It's easy to register online at http://www.nokr.org/
                In the past it's been an invaluable resource particularly during natural disasters, terrorist attacks and similar events abroad with multiple casualties from various countries.

                Several states also have state-wide next of kin registries through the Department of Motor Vehicles. You can voluntarily register your emergency contact info with the DMV and that info will be available to first responders/notifying agencies. I suggest you contact your local DMV or visit their website to find out if the service is available in your state.

                And yes, we all hope that none of us will ever need that information, but these are free and simple steps worth taking.

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                • Zeitgeist
                  Zeitgeist commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Never heard of this. What a great tool.

              • #9
                Odd... I was hoping that in case of death or incapacitation my phone would automatically wipe...

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                • #10
                  Originally posted by Matt N View Post
                  Odd... I was hoping that in case of death or incapacitation my phone would automatically wipe...
                  In that case...I suggest you name a trusted buddy as your primary emergency contact. He can delete your search history, bookmarks, favorites, porn collection, nude selfies, inappropriate texts and other incriminating evidence before notifying your mom.

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                  • #11
                    Originally posted by bug918 View Post
                    oh, and it's ms. bug918. :-)
                    Sorry about that. I'm 'Ms' Zeitgeist as well.
                    Judge me by the enemies I have made----Unknown

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