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Looking for some Cops to test an FI/License Scanning App i've created

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  • Looking for some Cops to test an FI/License Scanning App i've created

    I’m looking for a handful of law enforcement officers to participate in a beta test of a new iPhone app I am developing for FIs. The main purpose of the app is to be able to quickly record ID info by scanning the bar codes on driver’s licenses. There are already some apps out there that do this, but none that are geared toward law enforcement and none that are reasonably priced or that work well.




    Please go to http://j2mobileapps.com/public_html/...php/fi-helper/ for more information and a quick preview. This will be an official beta test conducted through the App Store. Only iPhone is available at this point.




    In particular, I’m looking for cops outside of California. I work in California and have already tested the App extensively with CA id’s. I need to confirm that it works in other states before releasing on the App Store. There are bound to be certain states that will cause errors for the App and I would like to address those. The App has error reporting built in for when a particular ID is not scanned properly.




    If anyone is interested please send me a message or email [email protected]




    The test will require you to submit an email address and your name and will require you to install the Apple Test Flight App on your phone. This is required by Apple to beta test apps.




    Thank you for your time and attention in this matter.

  • #2
    Sounds like a good idea in theory, but I think you may get some opposition shortly. Officers are reluctant to use personal cell phones for work related uses because they can be subpoenaed in court and anything and everything on that phone can be used against them.

    The next issue (being the suspicious creatures that we are) is how do we know that any information scanned isn't quietly forwarded to another recipient for scam or identity theft?

    Comment


    • #3
      I can think of 30,000 reasons why you aren't going to get many takers here.
      Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

      My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

      Comment


      • #4
        You've made a couple of good points. If a cop uses their personal cell phone for work it can be subpoenaed. The only way to be entirely free from this risk is to not take your phone to work with you at all.

        Just a brief discussion on the security issues brought up:

        We all use our phones during our shift (personal and work related) to make phone calls, send text messages, read email, surf the internet, look at maps, etc. These are all apps that retain information and can theoretically cause your phone to be subpoenaed. Probably something that many people have not even considered. Having all that in mind, just having your phone with you is putting you at risk. Using one more app is not going to make you any more at risk.

        We have all heard the horror stories of cops having the entire contents of their phone made available in court. However, in reality, I have not known or heard of anyone in particular that this has happened to. If anyone knows a legit example, we would all like to hear it and the details. Another huge safeguard is that iPhone security is close to impossible to break into if you have it enabled (and I recommend everyone have at least a 4 digit passcode on their phone). Even if some defense attorney gets their grubby mitts on your phone, they aren't going to be able to access it.

        In short, it is possible to get your phone subpoenaed but very unlikely.

        To address the other issue, I can understand the concern about scams/identity theft. This is very unlikely to happen with iPhone apps for a few reasons. 1 - All apps that are available through the app store have stringent guidelines for security and content. 2 - Anytime anyone is approved to release an app, that app is signed to the individual/organization that developed it. If I were to conduct any illegal activity with the App it would be easily traceable back to me as Apple has the name, address, phone, email, and banking information of every registered developer. 3 - IOS security will not generally allow secret emails/texts to be sent. That would require you to jailbreak the phone and then install 3rd party software outside of the app store.

        I don't blame cops for being hesitant. I would be too. I am available for personal contact if anyone would like to discuss further.

        Thanks for your post.

        Comment


        • #5
          We'd potentially be retaining a person's personal identifying information on our personal phones. In Colorado that's illegal.

          Even the possibility that it might happen, or that there was a backdoor allowing the producer of the app to skim information, will pose problems.

          Doubtful any department would allow it on any issued phone either.

          Good luck.
          "I am a Soldier. I fight where I'm told and I win where I fight." -- GEN George S. Patton, Jr.

          "With a brother on my left and a sister on my right, we face…. We face what no one should face. We face, so no one else would face. We are in the face of Death." -- Holli Peet

          Comment


          • #6
            I already have tech that does essentially the same thing in my vehicle. I can also think of two other ways I could accomplish the same thing...one of them is called "dispatch."
            Last edited by DepTroop; 04-12-2017, 05:21 PM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Your app is illegal for private cellphones.
              Now go home and get your shine box!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by tanksoldier View Post
                We'd potentially be retaining a person's personal identifying information on our personal phones. In Colorado that's illegal.
                Same here.


                Originally posted by tanksoldier View Post
                Doubtful any department would allow it on any issued phone either.

                Good luck.
                Yea, third party apps are a sticky situation. It's very difficult to confirm the reliability and safety of them, making most department's IT people lose their collective minds in short order.

                On a related note, what's the purpose of this app? There are already a number of ways to confirm the validity of a DL without having to rely on an app. Beyond that, I'm not seeing what the functionality of this app is supposed to be...

                Originally posted by kontemplerande
                Without Germany, you would not have won World War 2.

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                • #9
                  Thanks for the feedback guys. I guess I'll go back to the drawing board. The main purpose of the app is to be able to generate a makeshift FI card instantly from scanning an ID. Just something to save time during more routine types of activities. It does not check the validity of the ID. That is not really possible from barcodes because anyone in the fake ID business with even the slightest bit of sophistication can generate barcodes.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by JSJ5909 View Post

                    We have all heard the horror stories of cops having the entire contents of their phone made available in court. However, in reality, I have not known or heard of anyone in particular that this has happened to. If anyone knows a legit example, we would all like to hear it and the details. Another huge safeguard is that iPhone security is close to impossible to break into if you have it enabled (and I recommend everyone have at least a 4 digit passcode on their phone). Even if some defense attorney gets their grubby mitts on your phone, they aren't going to be able to access it.

                    In short, it is possible to get your phone subpoenaed but very unlikely.
                    I once had a Deputy US Marshal and an ATF agent try to subpoena my personally owned duty weapon. AND to seize it immediately . They attempted to get me to give it up right out of my duty rig

                    It was a long story (involving a shady gun dealer) and a long time ago but lets just say we had a very long discussion that ended in me personally calling the US Attorney (the presidential appointed person---not an assistant) before they backed down and had a subpoena issued for ME to bring the weapon to court.

                    So I learned in 1979 about using personally owned equipment on duty

                    Originally posted by JSJ5909 View Post

                    . Even if some defense attorney gets their grubby mitts on your phone, they aren't going to be able to access it
                    But neither would I be able to access it if the attorney had it
                    Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

                    My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Lots of assumptions by the OP...lots...
                      Now go home and get your shine box!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        In short, it is possible to get your phone subpoenaed but very unlikely.
                        False. It is a virtual certainty if for no other reason that to cause consternation.

                        they aren't going to be able to access it
                        False. If I was a defendant that might be true but our side is supposed to be open and transparent. If I used my personal phone to gather evidence the judge WILL order me to provide the password.
                        "I am a Soldier. I fight where I'm told and I win where I fight." -- GEN George S. Patton, Jr.

                        "With a brother on my left and a sister on my right, we face…. We face what no one should face. We face, so no one else would face. We are in the face of Death." -- Holli Peet

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Kind of a side note, but use of mobile phones at work is not going to become less of an issue as we move forward.

                          Free advice: Do not use an agency phone for anything that you wouldn't want to see blown up onto a poster board and displayed before a jury. Do not use a personal phone for official business for the same reason. Be aware of your surroundings when choosing your preferred communication devices (such as body-worn cameras, in-vehicle cameras, everywhere-around-you cameras). If you want to have social contact with your peers, do not use an agency device. My work phone is incredibly boring, but there is still plenty of stuff on there that will keep me from using it to document an investigation or generate evidence. Dedicated devices (stand-alone cameras, voice recorders, etc.) will be worth the headache of lugging them around in the long run. And there's nothing wrong with going low-tech. Pen and paper still work just fine for many situations.

                          In fantasy land, you could leave the personal phone in the locker when your tour starts, but let's get real. I'm not telling the SO, the paramour, and the spouse that I can't be reached at work because our communication could be discoverable in court.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by tanksoldier View Post

                            False. It is a virtual certainty if for no other reason that to cause consternation.



                            False. If I was a defendant that might be true but our side is supposed to be open and transparent. If I used my personal phone to gather evidence the judge WILL order me to provide the password.
                            Absolutely agree! I worked with a guy who's personal text messages to a friend (who isn't even the police) were pulled from his PERSONAL cellphone and printed in the newspaper. That was as current as last summer.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by tanksoldier View Post

                              False. It is a virtual certainty if for no other reason that to cause consternation.



                              False. If I was a defendant that might be true but our side is supposed to be open and transparent. If I used my personal phone to gather evidence the judge WILL order me to provide the password.
                              I can name 6 officers in my dept that have had their cell phones seized by courts.....so unlikely it is not
                              Judge me by the enemies I have made----Unknown

                              Comment

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