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  • DMV Confidentiality

    I work part time in dispatch in Southern California and never have really thought about the need to ask for the DMV Confidentiality that most departments give their full time officers/dispatchers pursuant to VC 1808.4. I recently heard some stories about dispatchers having issues with threats/etc from people that they had dealt with over the phone.

    Granted, it isnt nearly as much of a risk for dispatchers as officers on the street to have their address available via DMV, but I was curious, is this something I should be looking into? I never really thought it was necessary, but I am curious if it is something worthwhile to have? Are part time dispatchers even eligible for this protection?
    Last edited by ca911dispatch; 06-18-2006, 05:17 PM.

  • #2
    Ca911dispatch, Here is the CA VC for eligible persons, Looks like it does not say permanent or part time dispatcher. The Request for Confidentiality Form is DMV form "INV 32" and you would have your supervisor sign it. Hope this helps.

    Confidential Records: Address of Public Officers

    1808.4. (a) The home address of any of the following persons, that appears in any record of the department, is confidential, if the person requests the confidentiality of that information:

    (1) Attorney General.

    (2) State public defender.

    (3) Members of the Legislature.

    (4) Judges or court commissioners.

    (5) District attorneys.

    (6) Public defenders.

    (7) Attorneys employed by the Department of Justice, the office of the State Public Defender, or a county office of the district attorney or public defender.

    (8) City attorneys and attorneys who submit verification from their public employer that they represent the city in matters that routinely place them in personal contact with persons under investigation for, charged with, or convicted of, committing criminal acts, if those attorneys are employed by city attorneys.

    (9) Nonsworn police dispatchers.

    (10) Child abuse investigators or social workers, working in child protective services within a social services department.

    (11) Active or retired peace officers, as defined in Chapter 4.5 (commencing with Section 830) of Title 3 of Part 2 of the Penal Code.

    (12) Employees of the Department of Corrections, the Department of the Youth Authority, or the Prison Industry Authority specified in Sections 20017.77 and 20017.79 of the Government Code.

    (13) Nonsworn employees of a city police department, a county sheriff’s office, the Department of the California Highway Patrol, federal, state, and local detention facilities, and local juvenile halls, camps, ranches, and homes, who submit agency verification that, in the normal course of their employment, they control or supervise inmates or are required to have a prisoner in their care or custody.

    (14) County counsels assigned to child abuse cases.

    (15) Investigators employed by the Department of Justice, a county district attorney, or a county public defender.

    (16) Members of a city council.

    (17) Members of a board of supervisors.

    (18) Federal prosecutors and criminal investigators and National Park Service Rangers working in this state.

    (19) Any active or retired city enforcement officer engaged in the enforcement of the Vehicle Code or municipal parking ordinances.

    (20) Any employee of a trial court.

    (21) Any psychiatric social worker employed by a county.

    (22) Any police or sheriff department employee designated by the Chief of Police of the department or the sheriff of the county as being in a sensitive position. Any designation pursuant to this paragraph shall, for purposes of this section, remain in effect for three years subject to additional designations that, for purposes of this section, shall remain in effect for additional three-year periods.

    (23) (A) The spouse or child of any person listed in paragraphs (1) to (22), inclusive, regardless of the spouse’s or child’s place of residence.

    (B) The surviving spouse or child of a peace officer, as defined in Chapter 4.5 (commencing with Section 830) of Title 3 of Part 2 of the Penal Code, if the peace officer died in the line of duty.

    (b) The confidential home address of any of the persons listed in subdivision (a) shall not be disclosed to any person, except for any of the following:

    (1) A court.

    (2) A law enforcement agency.

    (3) The State Board of Equalization.

    (4) An attorney in a civil or criminal action that demonstrates to a court the need for the home address, if the disclosure is made pursuant to a subpoena.

    (5) Any governmental agency to which, under any provision of law, information is required to be furnished from records maintained by the department.

    (c) Any record of the department containing a confidential home address shall be open to public inspection, as provided in Section 1808, if the address is completely obliterated or otherwise removed from the record. The home address shall be withheld from public inspection for three years following termination of office or employment except with respect to retired peace officers, whose home addresses shall be withheld from public inspection permanently upon request of confidentiality at the time the information would otherwise be opened. The home address of the surviving spouse or child listed in subparagraph (B) of paragraph (23) of subdivision (a) shall be withheld from public inspection for three years following the death of the peace officer. The department shall inform any person who requests a confidential home address what agency the individual whose address was requested is employed by or the court at which the judge or court commissioner presides.

    (d) A violation of subdivision (a) by the disclosure of the confidential home address of a peace officer, as specified in paragraph (11) of subdivision (a), a nonsworn employee of the city police department or county sheriff’s office, or the spouses or children of these persons, including, but not limited to, the surviving spouse or child listed in subparagraph (B) of paragraph (23) of subdivision (a), that results in bodily injury to the peace officer, employee of the city police department or county sheriff’s office, or the spouses or children of these persons is a felony.

    Comment


    • #3
      thanks so much, I had reviewed that and hadn't really seen any distinction between full time and part time so I wasn't too sure. What I am curious about mostly, is it reall worth having this on my DL/Vehicle Reg as a dispatcher? Are you glad you did it or is it pointless to have?

      Comment


      • #4
        Just do it. I'm a dispatcher I have had it done for years now. It's a simple form and it keeps your info secret. The only recommendation I have is to keep your vehicle info on you at all times, or memorize your lic plate. When a plate is confidentialed it can not be ran in DMV by name or address... so if it gets stolen and you can't remember the plate, you are really screwed.

        I took a call like that from the wife of a CDC officer. It was confidential and she had no idea what the plate was. She had to go home and dig through a bunch of old paper work and delayed the report by several hours.
        Get low, get ground, get tactical! Sprawl! Sprawl! Sprawl!

        Comment


        • #5
          It's not a big thing to do. Just fill out the form, have a supervisor sign it and drop it in the mail.

          I don't think doing it will hurt, but with one exception. Unless things have changed recently, DMV records show the name of your agency only and not a Departmental address. Although rare, this can pose difficulties when a third party has a legitimate need to contact you.

          Sometimes this involves vehicle safety recalls, where in spite of California's privacy laws, the manufacturers usually track the vehicles in question and send out notices to the registered owner of record, based on DMV records.
          I believe I missed one recall notice because of DMV confidentiality.

          Another concern is if you ever get an automated ticket (red light camera, toll road camera) or a parking ticket blows off your window before you find it and over time, civil penalties start to attach. Odds are, you will never receive the notification or if you do, the whole department will now about it before you do. Before I retired I was responsible for handling automated red light camera and toll road violation notices generated on our patrol cars and on private cars owned by our officers and retirees. Mine was a large agency so it got to be a real mess when it came to tracking down where an individual was working or, in the case of a retiree, where they were living now. Frequently, notices could not be delivered in a timely manner.
          Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

          Comment


          • #6
            thanks for all the info, do you get the form from DMV or your department?

            Comment


            • #7
              Your department should have them or be able to request them for you. I don't think DMV sends them out to individuals anymore.
              Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

              Comment


              • #8
                Also be aware that although the form says the DMV will update your records within 7 days of receiving the form, it takes much longer. Recently it has taken over a month...

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by ca911dispatch
                  thanks for all the info, do you get the form from DMV or your department?

                  get it from usually, someone in the Traffic Unit at your department or your supervisor. takes about a month or so for it to actually get entered....
                  ''Life's tough......it's tougher if you're stupid.''
                  -- John Wayne

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Plus, you can take the usual other steps:
                    All mail to a P.O. Box
                    Unlisted, or name and number (no address) listed phone number. Or use a cell phone, which comes back to your P.O. Box.
                    I understand that in AZ, even property ownership records can be held off internet access. They have to go to the County Recorder to find out what property you own, which discourages most stalkers.
                    "A man who has nothing which he cares about more than he does about his personal safety is a miserable creature who has no chance of being free, unless made and kept so by the existing of better men than himself."
                    John Stuart Mill

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Sleuth
                      Plus, you can take the usual other steps:
                      All mail to a P.O. Box
                      Unlisted, or name and number (no address) listed phone number. Or use a cell phone, which comes back to your P.O. Box.
                      I understand that in AZ, even property ownership records can be held off internet access. They have to go to the County Recorder to find out what property you own, which discourages most stalkers.

                      Couldn't agree with you more. For such a small price you gain so much. All my mail has gone to a PO box since the day I was sworn. It also cuts down on the risk of identity theft since it is much harder to steal your mail at a PO box than a street mail box. Notice I said cuts down....you still have the risk of crooked postal employees as we have had several arrested here in Southern California in the last year or so.

                      And as to the original question.....if confidentiality is available to you.....do it. I have not heard a single reason yet as to why not to do it.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        where does your vehicle registration go every year? to your home address still or your department?

                        Originally posted by Fuzz
                        Couldn't agree with you more. For such a small price you gain so much. All my mail has gone to a PO box since the day I was sworn. It also cuts down on the risk of identity theft since it is much harder to steal your mail at a PO box than a street mail box. Notice I said cuts down....you still have the risk of crooked postal employees as we have had several arrested here in Southern California in the last year or so.

                        And as to the original question.....if confidentiality is available to you.....do it. I have not heard a single reason yet as to why not to do it.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by ca911dispatch
                          where does your vehicle registration go every year? to your home address still or your department?
                          It goes to your home or PO box or whatever address you give DMV.
                          Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

                          Comment

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