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State Trooper out all alone!?

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  • ACC703
    replied
    I can tell you, usually in the area of TX I am at, Troopers are all alone. There are usually PD, and County units in the area. Troopers in TX are some tough keys. You hardly ever hear a Trooper call for backup, but I can tell you if they do call for a unit, they will get 10. Troopers in my area are very respected people.

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  • Sleuth
    replied
    Another point about working alone, as I did for most of my career: You don't get endangered by officers who are NOT as mindful of tactics. I was alone, I was in charge, and I knew my capabilities and limitations. Some of the folks in my office were clueless (tactically), or 'thought' they knew how to do things.
    I made sure I was coming home from every encounter.

    Edited to add: Acting this way got me a rep for being a "hardass". But the FBI did a study of cop killers, and looked at the officers as well. It seemed most of the officers attacked and intentionally killed were described as "nice guys, gave people a break, used less force than others, etc."

    I am a survivor! I retired with all my fingers & toes, and have every intention of being the Worlds Oldest Living Civil Service Retiree. I never cared about my rep in the office, and it got so I was requested to assist for more arrests and warrents as a result.

    So study, train, practice, listen to your instincts. Working alone is (per at least one study) not as dangerous as working with others - it all depends who those others are!
    Last edited by Sleuth; 05-03-2006, 02:34 PM.

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  • My Gluttony
    replied
    The whole "by yourself" thing can work to your advantage.

    When a trooper pulls somebody over in an isolated area, the violator is also ALONE or with only a few people.

    When you make a stop in an urban enviornment you can draw an audience that may be sympathetic to the violator.

    Smart cops try to make their stops pulling OUT of housing projects instead of pulling INTO them. The driver is also more likely to be holding dope that way too.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bing_Oh
    replied
    Originally posted by USAcop
    The smaller town PDs, small sheriff departments, and Troopers cover each other real well. Law enforcement in lightly populated areas usually get along much better because they have to depend on each other more. You dont have as many turf battles.

    If you are confident in your abilities, tactically sound you will do fine no matter how desolate it is.
    Truer words have never been spoken...um, typed. I work in a very lightly populated agricultural county, and we work very closely with ALL of the other departments in the county, including the Ohio State Highway Patrol. There are nights when I spend more time outside of my jurisdiction backing up other agencies than I do in my own town. In comparison, I once worked for a much more populated county with alot more officers/departments, and there were always turf battles going on between departments with one agency's officers not talking to another.

    There's alot more teamwork between agencies when you know your backup is few and far between. There are occasional turf battles even in the more rural counties, but the road officers don't care when the $h!t hits the fan.

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  • yellowreef
    replied
    Originally posted by vsp645
    If worse comes to worse we could of course go to the M4 rifle though in a pinch I imagine you'd be hard pressed to get to it.
    That's why you don't get out of your vehicle without it

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  • msptrooper
    replied
    Trooper stuff

    MSP does not use cages in cars. We transport cuffed in the back, and belted in the front passenger seat. We have a restraint device for their feet if need be as well. I like the fact that we use no cage to tell you the truth.

    Sometimes there are limited number of Troopers working in a county at one time. Usually if there is a major situation going on, the local depts, and county sheriff deputies will lend a hand. I try to back up other depts when I think they need assistance for things, even if they are small things. Sometimes your backup can be miles away, and you have to take that into consideration when dealing with people sometimes.

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  • HCSO511
    replied
    oh someone is concerned for the trooper being alone? i work my entire county alone and rarely is there a trooper around much less anyone else.

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  • t150vsuptpr
    replied
    Originally posted by PeteBroccolo
    VSP obviously does not install protective screens in your patrol cars. No insult intended, but why won't VSP do that?
    Money, space, and the fact that we don't transport near as often as some agencies I guess.

    Originally posted by PeteBroccolo
    I certainly understand carrying a whole load of forms and other gear, but why not put the box up front in the right front seat?
    That's where my arrestees ride, one at a time, cuffed in back only, and sometimes I'll use the rope. No cage so I want them where I can watch them.
    Sometimes, if really necessary, I'll transport a second one in the right rear seat after complete search and again, the cuffs in back. Uncomfortable for them maybe, but it's usuallly a short trip of under 20 miles.

    Leave a comment:


  • deputytx1979
    replied
    Texas DPS is about the same as the rest. Some nights I hear eight of them on the radio other nights only one.
    Normally when there is only one out they let us know and make it a point of checking out on traffic with our dispatch instead of the state so we know where they are (We are unable to listen to state radio for some reason)
    While from time to time we have troopers or deputies that do not get along we take care of each other. This week we had a suicidal suspect with a shotgun without asking a trooper checked enroute to assist us and was the second unit on scene.
    A few weeks before that we had a trooper, one of the nights with only one out, pull a suspect over that was wanted by BATFE for firearms trafficing.
    There were three deputies on scene before the first trooper cover unit arrived.
    Like others have said, when you work with only a few people you learn to help each other because you never know when you will need the help.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tikidaddy
    replied
    Granted I am not a LEO at the moment (In the academy) so I can give limited advice. But, I am in the military (Infantry) I've been overseas, as well as spent 36 days in Louisiana riding with the local sheriffs deputies (with full police powers). One thing I don't know if anyone touched on is your training. I am speaking from experience here: When your put in a situation whether alone or with back-up, you'd be surprised how quick your training kicks in (provided you continuously train). Everything comes second nature, along with your natural survival instinct. Once you get on the job and out of the academy you can't stop training....ever! In the service or LE you have to always be on top of your game, goto the range on your off time, take time to practice drawing your sidearm, and doing corrective actions on your weapon, take self defense classes, etc. The more you train for what could happen the better prepared you are to defend yourself if you have to wait for back-up.

    Alot of departments near me are in rural areas and sometimes have anywhere from 1-10 guys on duty (some more depending on where) but they're backed up by adjacent towns and or state police and you'd be surprised how quick they show up when needed (experienced in LA)

    Again I'm not trying to sound like a know it all, because I am by no means one. Just trying to give some insight on my personal experiences.

    Hope it helped
    Last edited by Tikidaddy; 11-11-2005, 11:33 AM.

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  • gringoloco
    replied
    backup

    It sometimes doesn't matter where you are. You can be alone when it hits the fan in a major metropolitan area that has dozens of cops working, and your back up could take a few mintues to get to you because of several different reasons. A lot can happen in a couple of minutes.

    Leave a comment:


  • BlueKnight116
    replied
    Originally posted by JHoek
    Michigan State Police double up at night....
    With the budget cuts this probably isn't going to last for too much longer. Like after the next contract is signed. If this does come to pass I wonder if there will then be a push for Sheriff Department's to stop doubling up as well.

    Leave a comment:


  • USAcop
    replied
    I know a rural Trooper who takes care of problem prisoners like this:

    1)He tells him he will kick them out and leave them on the side of the road until they calm down or he can find a deputy with a cage. This Trooper would probably do it with the car moving.

    2)This technique is particuliarly effective when it is real cold or real hot.

    Leave a comment:


  • USAcop
    replied
    I know a rural Trooper who takes care of problem prisoners like this:

    1)He tells him he will kick them out and leave them on the side of the road until them calm down or he can find a deputy with a cage. This Trooper would probably do it with the car moving.

    2)This technique is particuliarly effective when it is real cold or real hot.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sleuth
    replied
    It's not the trooper you see, but the ones you don't see. Here in AZ, DPS uses slicktop (no external light bar) cars. Local departments have unmarked traffic cars, for "agressive drivers". They light up like a Xmas tree to stop you.
    Last edited by Sleuth; 11-02-2005, 11:09 AM.

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