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State Trooper out all alone!?

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  • #31
    Cages are nescessary for officer safety.

    Ours are installed to offer some protection in a roll over crash.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by USAcop
      Cages are nescessary for officer safety.

      Ours are installed to offer some protection in a roll over crash.
      ive heard that before, but the way that ours were installed, they wouldnt have done crap for us in a roll over, except maybe squash your head through your butt.

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      • #33
        Very good topic that deals with the 2 most frequently asked questions that are posed to me.

        1.Why are you by yourself?
        2. Hey Trooper where is your cage?

        I work in a fairly large county with a couple of city agencies and a decent sized sheriff's dept. Although I do frequently run calls that take me 30 minutes or more from the nearest backup.

        We are a full service State Police agency and take the majority of calls regardless of where they may originate.

        Its also good to hear from some of the other Troopers out there on this board, just to see how the other side lives.

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        • #34
          hey I had a rollover in a patrol car equipped with a cage. I was north on a State Blacktop, crested a hill, Truck coming south in my lane, I went as far right as I could, I was in a 99 CVPI, no anti-locks, went into a skid, slid into the ditch on the right, hit a culvert, popped the car and spun me. I suffered a concussion, My Pepper spray canister broke one of my ribs on the left side (It did not leak though). The idiot that caused the accident was able to open my door, I was hung in the seat belt. I gave him my boot knife which had never seen use in the ten years I had carried it, to cut me down, I figured it was hard telling where the thing would end up if I cut myself down. All four doors worked, only the back glass was broken and that by the culvert. When I visited the car at the body shop where it was being stripped for parts, the roof was "tented up" over where the cage had been. So all in all I am all for roll bar cages even if they do rob me of a couple inches of leg room, they might just save your life.
          Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

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          • #35
            Our dept has a minimum manning that HAS to be met every shift. If people only see 1 or 2 Troopers on patrol in a particular area, it's usually because the others are at the barracks doing reports or an invest somewhere.

            Other times there will be a Blue Blitz campaign, usually right before a holiday weekend. It's when all of the admin and specialty unit Troopers get back on the road and hammer the motoring public for traffic violations. Then you'll see 5 or 6 cruisers within a few miles of each other writing Vs.
            Whitechapel - Hate Creation

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            • #36
              Originally posted by SinePari
              Our dept has a minimum manning that HAS to be met every shift. If people only see 1 or 2 Troopers on patrol in a particular area, it's usually because the others are at the barracks doing reports or an invest somewhere.

              Other times there will be a Blue Blitz campaign, usually right before a holiday weekend. It's when all of the admin and specialty unit Troopers get back on the road and hammer the motoring public for traffic violations. Then you'll see 5 or 6 cruisers within a few miles of each other writing Vs.

              I used to drive from MA to NY on a regular basis, 120 miles in MA and 268 miles through NY. Granted I was driving in NY more but I almost never saw MA Troopers and always saw the NYSP (8-12 cars was typical).

              Motorists in MA drove much faster but when MA troopers pull vehicles over they often pull 2 and 3 at a time (more so 2)... I am a recent graduate so I don't have much road time, but I have tried twice to pull over 2 cars, once I succeeded and the other time the second motorist got off an exit... Ah well, what can you do?
              Can you say DYNASTY? Go Patriots!

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              • #37
                Originally posted by wannabeenytrp
                I used to drive from MA to NY on a regular basis, 120 miles in MA and 268 miles through NY. Granted I was driving in NY more but I almost never saw MA Troopers and always saw the NYSP (8-12 cars was typical).
                I assume you were driving on the Mass Turnpike, where there's only a handful of Troopers to patrol the entire length, from Boston to the NY line.

                Now if you get on one of the other interstates, 91, 95, 84, 91...then that's another story.
                Whitechapel - Hate Creation

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by SinePari
                  I assume you were driving on the Mass Turnpike, where there's only a handful of Troopers to patrol the entire length, from Boston to the NY line.

                  Now if you get on one of the other interstates, 91, 95, 84, 91...then that's another story.
                  yeah, I-90...

                  Stay Safe!
                  Can you say DYNASTY? Go Patriots!

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                  • #39
                    It's not the trooper you see, but the ones you don't see. Here in AZ, DPS uses slicktop (no external light bar) cars. Local departments have unmarked traffic cars, for "agressive drivers". They light up like a Xmas tree to stop you.
                    Last edited by Sleuth; 11-02-2005, 11:09 AM.
                    "A man who has nothing which he cares about more than he does about his personal safety is a miserable creature who has no chance of being free, unless made and kept so by the existing of better men than himself."
                    John Stuart Mill

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                    • #40
                      I know a rural Trooper who takes care of problem prisoners like this:

                      1)He tells him he will kick them out and leave them on the side of the road until them calm down or he can find a deputy with a cage. This Trooper would probably do it with the car moving.

                      2)This technique is particuliarly effective when it is real cold or real hot.

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                      • #41
                        I know a rural Trooper who takes care of problem prisoners like this:

                        1)He tells him he will kick them out and leave them on the side of the road until they calm down or he can find a deputy with a cage. This Trooper would probably do it with the car moving.

                        2)This technique is particuliarly effective when it is real cold or real hot.

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by JHoek
                          Michigan State Police double up at night....
                          With the budget cuts this probably isn't going to last for too much longer. Like after the next contract is signed. If this does come to pass I wonder if there will then be a push for Sheriff Department's to stop doubling up as well.
                          Disclaimer: The opinions I expressed here are mine and mine alone. They do not necessarily reflect the positions any other known person or organization.

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                          • #43
                            backup

                            It sometimes doesn't matter where you are. You can be alone when it hits the fan in a major metropolitan area that has dozens of cops working, and your back up could take a few mintues to get to you because of several different reasons. A lot can happen in a couple of minutes.

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                            • #44
                              Granted I am not a LEO at the moment (In the academy) so I can give limited advice. But, I am in the military (Infantry) I've been overseas, as well as spent 36 days in Louisiana riding with the local sheriffs deputies (with full police powers). One thing I don't know if anyone touched on is your training. I am speaking from experience here: When your put in a situation whether alone or with back-up, you'd be surprised how quick your training kicks in (provided you continuously train). Everything comes second nature, along with your natural survival instinct. Once you get on the job and out of the academy you can't stop training....ever! In the service or LE you have to always be on top of your game, goto the range on your off time, take time to practice drawing your sidearm, and doing corrective actions on your weapon, take self defense classes, etc. The more you train for what could happen the better prepared you are to defend yourself if you have to wait for back-up.

                              Alot of departments near me are in rural areas and sometimes have anywhere from 1-10 guys on duty (some more depending on where) but they're backed up by adjacent towns and or state police and you'd be surprised how quick they show up when needed (experienced in LA)

                              Again I'm not trying to sound like a know it all, because I am by no means one. Just trying to give some insight on my personal experiences.

                              Hope it helped
                              Last edited by Tikidaddy; 11-11-2005, 11:33 AM.
                              "Do not draw me without honor"

                              "Do not sheath me without Justice!"

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                              • #45
                                Texas DPS is about the same as the rest. Some nights I hear eight of them on the radio other nights only one.
                                Normally when there is only one out they let us know and make it a point of checking out on traffic with our dispatch instead of the state so we know where they are (We are unable to listen to state radio for some reason)
                                While from time to time we have troopers or deputies that do not get along we take care of each other. This week we had a suicidal suspect with a shotgun without asking a trooper checked enroute to assist us and was the second unit on scene.
                                A few weeks before that we had a trooper, one of the nights with only one out, pull a suspect over that was wanted by BATFE for firearms trafficing.
                                There were three deputies on scene before the first trooper cover unit arrived.
                                Like others have said, when you work with only a few people you learn to help each other because you never know when you will need the help.

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