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  • mrkoje
    replied
    Originally posted by Hutch
    I agree with K9.... Get it now...

    But with the others, Yes it ain't going to do you much, but years down the road you will promote faster..

    In alot of large departments you can't promote beyond SGT. until you have your masters degree... This helps weed out the feild alittle bit!
    You will also probably get paid more. If I can remember right the difference between having a Masters Degree and not having a degree is about $350 a month or $4200 a year. The difference between a Bachelors and Masters is about $100 more a month or $1200 a year.

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  • Delta784
    replied
    Originally posted by K9 Police
    Nationwide, there will be ALWAYS be police officer positions. There will ALWAYS be people leaving this job or retiring. There will ALWAYS be people applying.
    Of course, but my point is that the pool of applicants will soon be flooded with Veterans that usually receive either extra points or outright preference on entrance exams. We're already starting to see it, the last two classes were mostly Veterans, with the exception of some females that were hired from a gender-specific list.

    There will always be opportunities to earn a graduate degree, but there may not be many good police jobs available to non-Veterans in the near future.

    Leave a comment:


  • K9 Police
    replied
    Its all relative to opinion, which is ok.

    However, getting a Masters degree and then applying for a police officer position is NOT overqualification. Maybe in some departments that don't value education, but mine and many others the more educated the officer the better. If a department did not hire me because I was "overqualified" then, of course just my own opinion, screw them. A Masters degree *should* in many departments put yourself ahead of the game not only in terms of your resume, but also in terms of the depth of your knowledge and your education. Some departments even pay you more for having your Masters degree when you get hired! It is, obviously, not needed for entry level but if you have other career aspirations it will be nice to have it already completed. Even during the time you are getting your education, do an internship or reserve position with a department that you are interested in to get your foot in the door. Put yourself ahead of the game.

    Yes, you can try distance learning but it is not the same as going to class. I have tried it and some people like it, but you do not get the same feel and you will not get the same type of references you would being face to face with professors and peers. If you are thinking PhD down the road, or even teaching, it will be more helpful to actually know professionals in the education world other than through a computer. You will also find with the better programs and colleges out there, they want letters of recommendation from professors during your college days for admission and work samples. Unless you remain close to them for years to come, it becomes increasingly difficult. Yes, some programs don't require any but some of the better ones do.

    Some departments do reimburse, but you will find that more will only reimburse if the degree is towards something criminal justice related and some are very strict about that. My former department would not give any money towards a MBA degree; they said it has nothing to do with criminal justice. My current department sponsors a Police Leadership masters course at headquarters through a local respected university. Departments will offer programs but like mine, you have to take that specific degree which you may not like or is too constricted of a future vision for you. A masters in Police Leadership would not be very helpful if I decide to leave law enforcement in the future. If you want to be a well-rounded competitive professional, getting something other than CJ degree is worthwhile and will cost more. It will also most likely take a lot more work (accounting, law, business, etc).

    Am I talking about the minimums you need to get hired? No, go get your HS diploma or AA and apply. As I and others mentioned, if you want that Masters get it now and have it under your belt. It will open more doors, especially in the future if you do get some patrol experience and you think you want to go federal with you MBA degree, or MPA degree, or a law degree. Or if you think you want to go up the ranks, or become a chief, or teach criminal justice in college, or explore police policies, go state or federal, or start up a private practice, or do something completely different....

    Nationwide, there will be ALWAYS be police officer positions. There will ALWAYS be people leaving this job or retiring. There will ALWAYS be people applying. Are there times when it is harder than others to get on, sure there is. However, I would not let the possibility of it might being harder in the future to get hired stop from getting something that you want. You are going to have to make a decision, which one is more important to you. Whichever one that is, go with it and see where it takes you....

    K9
    Last edited by K9 Police; 07-15-2005, 02:25 PM.

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  • pkagel
    replied
    I've met people of all different levels of education w/ no common sense and btw, I do know an officer who has an MBA that left a very good paying job and has a lot of common sense so yes, they are out there.

    Leave a comment:


  • akatrk
    replied
    Originally posted by Shae209
    Has anyone here ever met anyone with a Masters that has an ouce of common sense? I might know 1, maybe 2 that have common sense. I work with people who hold Masters degrees and you would not believe what idiots they are.

    If you want to persue your masters, I think that's great. I'm all for higher learning (my 9 yo knows that college isn't an option, it's a requirement!)
    That's a bold statement for someone who's an advocate for higher education. Oh, by the way, it's pursue not persue.

    Leave a comment:


  • Beentheredonethat!
    replied
    Ok, I normally just read and rarely reply. However, on this I must.

    I have three degrees, an Associates in Fire Science and Administration, a Bachelor's in business administration, and a Master's in business administration. I did the master's with the intention of eventually working my way up the ranks when I get a career.

    Now, you might ask what a business degree has to do with law enforcement? The curriculum for my business degree deals with mid to upper management responsibilities. There were classes on human resource management, ethics, organizational behavior, social psychology, contract law, operations management, and budgeting. Although, I must admit, I do agree completely about lack of need for this degree for an entry level patrolman position.

    My thinking was this, I do not want to be out walking the streets or patroling for the next 25 years answering calls back to back. I have been in Fire/EMS for 10 years. I know that after a few years, I will want to further my advancement up the ladder. I obtained my degree now, BEFORE I have a family. A police career is hard enough on a family, but to try and manage school???

    This is just one person's opinion, but I am very glad I have it out of the way. The added bonus was that I received a lot of classes on investing and taxes. The little money I have been able to set aside is now making me money on the side since I have a strong understanding of investments, and a strong understanding of the tax code.

    Leave a comment:


  • Delta784
    replied
    Originally posted by Shae209
    Has anyone here ever met anyone with a Masters that has an ouce of common sense?
    Yes, about 70% of the people I work with.

    Leave a comment:


  • Shae209
    replied
    Originally posted by WILDWDTOUR
    aLOT OF PEOPLE TELL ME THAT OVERQUALIFICATION FOR A JOB CAN SEND A WRONG MESSAGE.. HOW USEFUL WOULD A MASTERS DEGREE BE IN L.E?
    Not a cop but felt the need to respond here because of my strong feels about Master's Degrees.

    Has anyone here ever met anyone with a Masters that has an ouce of common sense? I might know 1, maybe 2 that have common sense. I work with people who hold Masters degrees and you would not believe what idiots they are. Sure, they have tons of book smarts and great ideas, but they totally lack the skills to realize which ideas are just not logistically possible in any way, shape or form. Granted, this may be because the ones I work with are usually fresh out of school, with little or no prior work experience.

    The couple that do have common sense actually worked with just a BA/BS for a few years before going to grad school. The grad school helped them learn to develop ideas, but I think it was during that time in between that they developed the common skills needed to properly and successfully execute the ideas.

    If you want to persue your masters, I think that's great. I'm all for higher learning (my 9 yo knows that college isn't an option, it's a requirement!) But I don't recomend going to grad school at 22 and entering the workforce at 24 with a masters degree. You could be seen as a self-righteous, egotistical idiot - much like many of my marketing managers And that kind of attitude in LE could get you or someone else killed these days.

    Leave a comment:


  • wayno1806
    replied
    Ok, your sitting there and facing the oral board. You have an AA degree in CJ, a BS degree in CJ and a Master in Public Administration. You would be overqualified..... and the panel, who is probably a sgt. and detective only have AA degree and are working towards their BS and Maybe a MS at University of Phoenix or some on line school. They may look at you as some pompous rich boy who is too educated.

    The requirements to become a cop is only a HS diploma or GED. It's like your going hunting with an AR-15 or AK47. It sucks, but that is the facts of life. If you all ready have the MS degree, I wouldn't mention it unless they ask. I would just say that you are college educated with a BS in CJ. But if they ask, elaborate on the MS only for advancement after you come onto the force as a rookie and pay your dues. Tell them, that you were fortunate and finished your MS degree, but your love and passion has always been with LE and being a street cop. Tell them that you plan on using the MS degree in 7 to 10 years when it's time for promotion....downplay it, don't overplay it. www.****************************

    Leave a comment:


  • Delta784
    replied
    Originally posted by K9 Police
    Thats wonderful, but there will always be police officer positions in the future; not necessarily just MA. The job outlook for police officer positions nationwide if very good right now, look at any employment lookout data.
    Perhaps you don't have Veteran's preference where you are, but where that exists, police jobs are going to become increasingly difficult to get with the thousands of returning Veterans from Iraq, Afghanistan, etc. Just ask non-Vets from the Vietnam era. The openings will be there, but unless you're a Veteran, it's going to be fierce competition.

    Get the police job now, while you can. With the explosion of distance learning, it's entirely feasible, even practical, to earn a graduate degree in nearly any subject you want, all while being employed full-time.

    Leave a comment:


  • dawgguy
    replied
    master's degree

    I have to agree with the people telling you to get a job first. Get your undergraduate's degree, get a job, then go get a master's degree later. I would not do it though immediately after getting hired by a new dept though. Get settled in the job and then go for it. Also your dept may even pay for the degree. Mine had to be somewhat related to law enforcement for my dept to pay for it. So, I got an MBA and it cost very little out of my pocket. No student loans to pay back, only had to agree to stay with the dept. for two years after I recieved my degree.

    As for a family life. My own experience was that it was not adversely affected that much. There are not that many test to study for in a master's program. Mostly research papers and I apparently have the gift of baffling them with B.S. It took me about three years to finish the program and someday it will be more than worth the inconvience and extra hours of sleep that I lost completing the degree.

    Leave a comment:


  • akatrk
    replied
    Wildwdtour, Get the job first, worry about your decisions after you see if policing is actually for you. You'll be surprised on how many people (or how few people nowadays) want to be a police officer. Once they get on, they start b*tching on how the job sucks with only a couple of months on and quit. Get some time on your shoes, see if you like it, and then start to look at how you can make this job work for you.

    For example, some departments actually have free college courses available for officers to attend, while some colleges offer a discount to law enforcement personnel in the form of a grant and some like my department, actually offer scholarships to Harvard. What I'm saying is try to use the job if they offer anything available to you. Go for your Master's if that's what you want, but see if you can use the job to help you attain it. What I'll tell you is the same thing that an old-timer told me. Rape the job for whatever training you can get from it because the job is going to rape you for twenty years.

    Leave a comment:


  • K9 Police
    replied
    Originally posted by Conner
    Would having a 4 year degree be much better then having a 2 year degree when applying?
    Yes.

    K9

    Leave a comment:


  • K9 Police
    replied
    Originally posted by Delta784
    Not necessarily.

    In MA, getting a Civil Service PD job has always been like hitting the lottery, and now with thousands more Veterans that are going to start taking the upcoming tests, the job may very well NOT be there later.
    Thats wonderful, but there will always be police officer positions in the future; not necessarily just MA. The job outlook for police officer positions nationwide if very good right now, look at any employment lookout data.

    If you want to go for your masters, do it before you get the position. Take an extra year to get through it with some loans and apply near the end. If you start to hate the job, as I have seen many cops do, you will have something to fall back on and go elsewhere. DO NOT GET TRAPPED in this profession; have a fall-out plan in place.

    K9

    Leave a comment:


  • concon02
    replied
    Would having a 4 year degree be much better then having a 2 year degree when applying?

    Leave a comment:

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