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  • Working as an Officer in Canada, then US? Plus...

    Alright so I have a few questions.

    Right now Im in grade 11 and interested in becoming a police officer. I live in Ontario, Canada and Im fairly sure that when I start off policing I'd like for it to be somewhere around here. So, if I were to do say 3+ years here (which is usually the amount of time most higher agencies want--or so I've read) and then move to the U.S (after getting my citizenship and everything sorted out) if I wanted to apply to a federal agency there, would they require ANOTHER 3 years of me policing in the U.S before I could apply? That would seem a bit unfair..although I guess things arent always fair! lol

    ANYways, on to my next question. In my area there is a police foundations course (which is affiliated with my local police department-Ottawa) offered at a college. It takes 2 years to complete. Now, I would also like to get a 4-year type degree, and this college has an 'Articulation Agreement' with a local University which upon successful completion of Police foundations, will put 5.0 credits towards the completion of a B.A in either criminology, psychology, or sociology. Should I do it? I mean, right now Id like to do a B.A w/ Honours in psychology which is 4 years usually, but if I did it this way Id have a B.A plus the 2 year police foundations in 5 years instead of 6.

    It sounds good, I just wouldnt want to do it if I later found out that some fed agencies didnt consider it an official 4-year university degree.

    WOW. Sorry for writting that much-all pretty tedious. Any advice/comments are appreciated, thanks!

    P.S I appologize if you saw this on ********** as well, as I know many of you survey both, just trying to get the most opinions possible

  • #2
    I'm no expert on immigration, but I'm pretty sure that getting your resident alien/citizenship status is going to be the biggest hurdle. It seems that unless you're from some third-world hellhole, getting that status is near impossible.

    A guy I work with is from Northern Ireland (it's always an adventure trying to decipher his radio transmissions), and he got citizenship by agreeing to serve time in the US Armed Forces, I think it was 4 years. Something to think about, and military experience will look good when applying to LE agencies.

    As for the degree, as long as it's a 4-year degree from a legitimately accredited college or university, you're good to go. Just make sure that the agencies that you're interested in accept degrees in your field of study.

    Good luck!
    Talk sense to a fool, and he will call you foolish - Euripides

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    • #3
      Thanks. Damn immigration..we're like the same damn country! Just minus the guns ANYways,

      Originally posted by Delta784
      he got citizenship by agreeing to serve time in the US Armed Forces, I think it was 4 years. Something to think about, and military experience will look good when applying to LE agencies.
      Yea..I've thought about that aswell. No offence to canada and all but our military is pretty much..well..we have no military. Just a bunch of people going downtown on buses everyday in military fatigue to fill out forms in stuffy offices. This is what I get for living in the nations capital..lol

      Anyways, I think Im being sinical here. The point is I admit to being interested in the US military. Its just..Im a little confused. Are you suggesting I go for the military after I graduate from high school? I have no family there and somehow doubt I could support myself on whatever the military pays. Ah Im so confused

      Actually..another question arrises from that. If I were to complete high school, get my university degree here, and then agree to a few years military service there (which would hopefully get me into your little country, and also look good), do you think I would still need a few years of LE experience in order to be considered for federal jobs? (ex. U.S Marshals, FBI...)

      Ah long again, sorry about that, anyways if anyone has any opinions/advice on this Id appreciate it, and thanks again Delta.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by SniperChick
        Thanks. Damn immigration..we're like the same damn country! Just minus the guns ANYways,



        Yea..I've thought about that aswell. No offence to canada and all but our military is pretty much..well..we have no military. Just a bunch of people going downtown on buses everyday in military fatigue to fill out forms in stuffy offices. This is what I get for living in the nations capital..lol

        Anyways, I think Im being sinical here. The point is I admit to being interested in the US military. Its just..Im a little confused. Are you suggesting I go for the military after I graduate from high school? I have no family there and somehow doubt I could support myself on whatever the military pays. Ah Im so confused

        Actually..another question arrises from that. If I were to complete high school, get my university degree here, and then agree to a few years military service there (which would hopefully get me into your little country, and also look good), do you think I would still need a few years of LE experience in order to be considered for federal jobs? (ex. U.S Marshals, FBI...)

        Ah long again, sorry about that, anyways if anyone has any opinions/advice on this Id appreciate it, and thanks again Delta.
        Our military takes care of the troops. If you are single you get free room and board. And a decent salary. Married folks get subsidies for housing allowances to help support their families. One guy in my company was from south africa, who joined the US military to become a citizen. Depending on which branch of service you selected, you could also get college money to go to school after you got out. I got 30k from the army college fund/GI Bill when I got out.
        Liberalism is a mental disorder
        -Resistance implies Guilt-

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        • #5
          Originally posted by SniperChick
          Anyways, I think Im being sinical here. The point is I admit to being interested in the US military. Its just..Im a little confused. Are you suggesting I go for the military after I graduate from high school? I have no family there and somehow doubt I could support myself on whatever the military pays. Ah Im so confused
          If it could be arranged as far as immigration, I'd try to join the US Military right out of high school. That would secure your citizenship, and also give you something good for your resume. Some LE agencies will give you preference for being a Veteran.

          Also, the military bends over backwards to offer college education to its members. Just about every military base I saw had a satellite campus for the University of Maryland, and with online education being the rage, it's very feasible to earn a college degree while in the military, at a cut-rate price. I wish I had taken my own advice.

          As for what the military pays, keep in mind that they provide housing & meals. Your only out-of-pocket expenses would be civilian clothing, a car if you wanted one, booze, off-base restaurants, etc. You can actually save a lot of money while in the military, if you're careful. Once again, I wish I listened to my own advice, when I was in.

          Originally posted by SniperChick
          Actually..another question arrises from that. If I were to complete high school, get my university degree here, and then agree to a few years military service there (which would hopefully get me into your little country, and also look good), do you think I would still need a few years of LE experience in order to be considered for federal jobs? (ex. U.S Marshals, FBI...)
          Every Federal agency has different standards, and even then the standards will change according to the needs of the agency. Back in the late 80's-early 90's (before I had a degree), the DEA temporarily dropped their requirement for a 4-year degree, if you had prior law enforcement experience. By the time I had made my decision to apply, the degree requirement was back in place.
          Last edited by Delta784; 03-08-2005, 12:25 AM.
          Talk sense to a fool, and he will call you foolish - Euripides

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          • #6
            Over the years I ran into several people who joined the military having never even been to the US. Getting your citizenship is then a matter of the requisite red tape (miles and miles of it). You could, more than likely, put 4 years in, see some of the world, maybe learn something cool, and come out the other side as a citizen and veteran. Put the 100 bucks a month into the GI Bill the first year and get 1000 bucks a month out for four years for any US college (unknown about Canadian colleges). Take two years of college, apply to academy of your choice at 24 years old.

            Pretty good deal if you ask me.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by south
              Over the years I ran into several people who joined the military having never even been to the US. Getting your citizenship is then a matter of the requisite red tape (miles and miles of it). You could, more than likely, put 4 years in, see some of the world, maybe learn something cool, and come out the other side as a citizen and veteran. Put the 100 bucks a month into the GI Bill the first year and get 1000 bucks a month out for four years for any US college (unknown about Canadian colleges). Take two years of college, apply to academy of your choice at 24 years old.

              Pretty good deal if you ask me.
              I like it!

              Thanks guys.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Delta784
                It seems that unless you're from some third-world hellhole, getting that status is near impossible.

                Good luck!
                I have no interest in commenting, but this comment made me laugh for a good couple of minutes.

                side note: I work with lots of canadians, well former canadians.
                Peace by power

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                • #9
                  Sorry to burst your bubble but it is not quite that easy. Every branch of the US military requires applicants to be a US permanent resident or a US citizen to join up. You cannot, as a Canadian citizen, simply apply for the US military, get accepted, then become a resident and citizen. I would love to hear from someone who has actually been accepted to the US military having never having been to the US! Further, as a Canadian citizen, you cannot simply move to the USA after high school. The only way you could obtain residency would be through family or employment.
                  It is not the critic who counts...

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                  • #10
                    The county I work for has a regional academy. All cities in the county (including the county sheriffs) send their recruits to the same academy. I went to the academy with a Canadian who had been a Vancouver police officer for 5 or 6 years and then moved down to California to be an officer here. He had been in the Canadian Special Forces before hand.

                    I don't know what requirements he needed to satisfy before being hired, but I can tell you he moved straight down from Vancouver and into the police academy here. I know because a bunch of us helped him move into his apartment out of the UHaul he had been living in for a week .

                    I know that most U.S Federal LE agencies require specific degrees. I don't think they all require prior law enforcement experience.

                    scrubb
                    “You sleep safe in your beds because rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would do you harm.”

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                    • #11
                      Another option might be to join the Canadian Forces (which extends beyond Ottawa btw lol) I'm with the Military Police and I'm fortunate enough that I can finish my university degree at the expense of the Canadian Forces and see a little bit of the world as well. I would also be able to go through the Naturalization process (if I so choose, which I don't lol) and become an American Citizen this way. I've looked into it before and it seemed to be a long complicated process, but it's possible. I can't remember the website off-hand that I looked at for the process, but if I come across it again I'd be happy to share that with you.

                      Just a little bit of extra info.....I finished the Police Foundations program as well (not at Algonquin however) and I'm looking at Criminal Justice with Athabasca University. Reason being is that rather than 5.0 credits, I'll have 2 years toward the 4 year degree. Much easier on the brain Athabasca can be done through correspondence too and they start courses at the beginning of each month which could potentially allow you to get the other 2 years of the degree done faster, depending on how much of a course load you want. It's a credited university and, on a side note, I think all of the Canadian Universities are. Which means that our degree's hold the same value in the USA as theirs, and the same with theirs here in Canada.

                      If you have questions, feel free to post, or send me a PM. Always glad to help out.

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                      • #12
                        i received over 60 credits while in the miliatry, also most federal law enforcmeent positions require a four year degree, something else to think about.
                        Happy to be here proud to serve

                        "Well it appears this lock does not accept american express."

                        Never trust fire fighters to point out a suspect.

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