Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Serving as a reserve officer for a department

Collapse

300x250 Mobile

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Serving as a reserve officer for a department

    How many of you guys started out as reserve officers for departments? I live in a smaller county and have been told that departments typically hire academy graduates on as reserve officers until 1) field training is complete and 2) a full-time position becomes available. Is this the norm across the United States?

    Thanks!

  • #2
    Well that will certainly depend agency by agency. Most reserves in TX are non-paid positions and you only have to work roughly 24-36 hours a month. Some cities do pay them but those are rare. A lot of reserves here have retired or moved on to other professions but use the reserve programs to keep their license valid in case they want to go back one day.

    This question is like asking about Baskin Robins having 31 flavors and is it normal to have Tutti Frutti.

    Comment


    • #3
      They are unpaid in Texas? So a reserve position in Texas is essentially to keep someone from losing their certification?

      Comment


      • #4
        Not always but in many agencies, yes. There is a city close to my home town that does pay them but that's mainly because they have few full time on the roles and needed to supplement them. So they offer pay for reserves. My county sheriff has a reserve program that they leave open mainly for senior or retired guys who want to keep working in a "retired" status. Ft. Worth has a reserve program but I'm not totally sure how they run theirs.

        In my home town, not where I work, they have just recently started their reserve program. The reserves augment patrol running traffic or acting as a second in the cars. They often handle routine "walk-in" complaints and statements in order to take the some load off the full time guys so they can handle cases and calls that will take more time than the reserves can pull.

        Reserves is TX have to meet the exact same requirements as a full time officer. Same academy, same background, same everything. The state has determined this but again, how each agency handles and treats their reserves depends as much as there are cities. The state does restrict reserves from pulling off-duty security gigs. For a reserve to work these, they must hold a security license and not work under the auspice of a police officer.

        Comment


        • #5
          In Iowa being a reserve officer will not count toward keeping your peace officer license active.
          Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

          My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Iowa #1603 View Post
            In Iowa being a reserve officer will not count toward keeping your peace officer license active.
            ^^^ HappyP, this is exactly why I say it depends agency to agency and even state to state. Apparently Iowa won't let reserve time count toward keeping you license active while in TX, it has to be held by an agency and you have to keep up with training updates and attend 40 hours (if I remember correctly) of training in order to keep it active.

            If you are looking toward a specific agency, talk to them and see how they do it, what's entailed, pay, duties, etc. Only an agency themself can give you up-to-date and correct information as it pertains to them.

            Comment


            • #7
              It happens in some jurisdictions, and it may be the norm in a region, but I would not say it is the norm for law enforcement in general.

              Comment


              • #8
                There is no such animal here in PA.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I started as an unpaid reserve after paying my own way through academy and buying all my own gear including my handheld radio. After about 4 years they started paying us $10/hour. The Sheriff I started under, in order to get reserve officers, had to submit to the County Commissioners that the program would not cost the county any money.

                  Our department doesn't have any reserves who are not fully licensed peace officers and our reserves are not guaranteed full-time jobs if a slot becomes available.
                  Last edited by chapwolfe; 12-31-2014, 01:08 PM.
                  Officer Jay McGuire, Minneapolis Park Police EOW 5/14/2009 age 11
                  Among Texas' finest
                  Deputy Andy Taylor, Llano County SO EOW 5/9/2005
                  Senior Deputy Jessica Laura Hollis, Travis County SO EOW 9/18/2014
                  Darren H. Goforth, Harris County SO EOW 8/28/2015

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    No, not the norm.

                    Here in Washington State, there is no self-sponsorship at police academies. If agencies want to dodge the expense of training a new officer, they hire laterals. Reserve officers are unpaid volunteers.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Seventy2002 View Post
                      No, not the norm.

                      Here in Washington State, there is no self-sponsorship at police academies. If agencies want to dodge the expense of training a new officer, they hire laterals. Reserve officers are unpaid volunteers.
                      Pretty much the way it is in Iowa
                      Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

                      My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Seventy2002 View Post
                        No, not the norm.

                        Here in Washington State, there is no self-sponsorship at police academies. If agencies want to dodge the expense of training a new officer, they hire laterals. Reserve officers are unpaid volunteers.
                        Although at some departments in WA, reserves have a lot of opportunities to be paid. Some filling in shifts, some a stipend. One department even lets their reserves fill shifts in their jail to the tune of something like $26/hour.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Nathan571 View Post
                          Although at some departments in WA, reserves have a lot of opportunities to be paid. Some filling in shifts, some a stipend. One department even lets their reserves fill shifts in their jail to the tune of something like $26/hour.
                          ^^^ Yep.

                          Also, many reserves get preference points if they apply with the agency that they are a reserve with or sometimes even other agencies. About half of my department started as reserves, including the chief. I know many reserves who have been picked up fulltime within a year of graduating the reserve academy.
                          "Respect is earned. Honesty is appreciated. Trust is gained. Loyalty is returned."

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Nathan571 View Post
                            Although at some departments in WA, reserves have a lot of opportunities to be paid.
                            My agency discontinued its reserve program many years ago. The chief who ended it came from a department without reserves. His unfamiliarity may have influenced his decision. The stated reason was, if the department was short-handed, he wanted the city to hire full-time officers, not tell him to fill the gap with reserves.

                            I can see the Chief's point but a few years later the city was telling him there wasn't any money no matter what the need. Those reserves would have been good to have on many busy Saturday nights.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              In rural parts of Massachusetts, entire departments are made up only of reserves, or part time officers.

                              Comment

                              MR300x250 Tablet

                              Collapse

                              What's Going On

                              Collapse

                              There are currently 5079 users online. 315 members and 4764 guests.

                              Most users ever online was 26,947 at 07:36 PM on 12-29-2019.

                              Welcome Ad

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X