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  • Any diabetics who have been through an academy?

    I am a type 1 diabetic, and I have been cleared medically. I will most likely be attending an academy in January and would like some tips and advice for things I can do during the academy to help. Most specifically during PT (I wear an Insulin pump, i workout frequently now doing cross-fit and during then i just take my pump off).

  • #2
    Originally posted by Patriot91 View Post
    I am a type 1 diabetic, and I have been cleared medically. I will most likely be attending an academy in January and would like some tips and advice for things I can do during the academy to help. Most specifically during PT (I wear an Insulin pump, i workout frequently now doing cross-fit and during then i just take my pump off).
    contact member tanksolider --------------I know he is a diabetic
    Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

    My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

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    • #3
      Thank You.

      Comment


      • #4
        I know a few diabetics in the dept. They don't seem to have problems. Though be warned, some depts. will find a reason not to hire you.
        Judge me by the enemies I have made----Unknown

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Zeitgeist View Post
          I know a few diabetics in the dept. They don't seem to have problems. Though be warned, some depts. will find a reason not to hire you.
          Well I already know that i will be hired, I will be starting the Academy in January. You are right though, some depts will give a problem. I'm just looking for some pointers/tips throughout the academy. I've already worked as a peace-officer/ other quasi-law enforcement jobs with no problems at wll, but anything can be of help!!
          Last edited by Patriot91; 12-19-2014, 11:52 AM.

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          • #6
            Just get out there and be the best... show everyone that T1 isn't going to slow you down. As corny as it sounds.. every time you run you are running for everyone with T1. Good Luck!

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            • #7
              Read this http://lib.post.ca.gov/Publications/Endo.pdf

              It lists all the hazards of being a diabetic police officer. Take those hazards and apply them to what you will may face at the academy.

              I thing the biggest risk you may face is sudden drops in blood sugar resulting from intense sessions of exercise. Carry your glucose tablets with you when you do PT and watch your blood sugar.
              Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

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              • #8
                You may not want to bring up your condition with the Academy staff, but let them know just in case. Medical issues are confidential but you will want them to know what is going on if you happen to have a problem.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by L-1 View Post
                  Read this http://lib.post.ca.gov/Publications/Endo.pdf

                  It lists all the hazards of being a diabetic police officer. Take those hazards and apply them to what you will may face at the academy.

                  I thing the biggest risk you may face is sudden drops in blood sugar resulting from intense sessions of exercise. Carry your glucose tablets with you when you do PT and watch your blood sugar.
                  The above post is great information! I'm a type 1 diabetic and the best advice I can give you is to know your body and listen to it! If you don't then check your blood sugar religiously. When you start getting low have glucose tablets readily available. Keep those tablets on you at all times! When I was on SWAT I had a pouch just for tablets. Long BPs can take their toll on you. Do you take short and long acting insulin? On the days you know PT is going to be intense decrease the amount of long acting insulin you take. Your body burn through the food you eat at a faster rate.

                  If you can show that your diabetes is under control the easier it will be for you when going through a medical review. Try to keep your A1C around 6. Good luck in the academy!
                  Strong Body, Sharp Mind And Good Tactics!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Rush817 View Post
                    The above post is great information! I'm a type 1 diabetic and the best advice I can give you is to know your body and listen to it! If you don't then check your blood sugar religiously. When you start getting low have glucose tablets readily available. Keep those tablets on you at all times! When I was on SWAT I had a pouch just for tablets. Long BPs can take their toll on you. Do you take short and long acting insulin? On the days you know PT is going to be intense decrease the amount of long acting insulin you take. Your body burn through the food you eat at a faster rate.

                    If you can show that your diabetes is under control the easier it will be for you when going through a medical review. Try to keep your A1C around 6. Good luck in the academy!
                    Thank you for your advice. I am already passed medical review, etc. I completed the hiring process and am going in January almost 99.9%. What kind of glucose tablets do you use? I always found that in order to really get any out of them you need to eat alot because they arn't high in carb content. I take short acting insulin via an insulin pump so i can simply adjust my levels as I need. You not only being a PO with T1 but a SWAT officer is great motivation indeed, i'm glad to hear that.
                    Last edited by Patriot91; 12-21-2014, 10:32 AM.

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                    • #11
                      Patriot91 PMed me but I decided to post here so as to be of use to other applicants as well.

                      Much depends on the type of academy, your individual physiology and the method you use to control the disease.

                      The biggest consideration is what TYPE of academy you're attending: "college style" vs "paramilitary".

                      I was on a pump as well and I attended a relaxed college style academy. It had it's difficult moments but we didn't have TAC officers or the like bothering us between blocks of instruction, and during classroom days we could eat and drink at our desks. That made it very easy to monitor my blood sugar and take corrective action if needed.

                      However, that wasn't ALWAYS the case. Defensive Tactics was 8 hours of instruction a day, with the only real break at lunch. Driving and shooting alternated mornings and afternoons with half the class at each, and there were really no reliable, good breaks to test my BG. PT was usually Crossfit style and lasted anywhere from 20 minutes to an hour depending.

                      A paramilitary style academy, such as many of my co-workers attended, likely would have much fewer opportunities for testing and correction.

                      First, I would suggest you tell your instructors, offline, that you're diabetic. If everything goes to Hell they have to know what's wrong and what to do to keep you alive.

                      Second, you have to take whatever opportunities you have to monitor and correct your BG. That may mean not going out and smoking and joking during breaks, or whatever. Monitor and correct at every opportunity. A pump makes that very easy, a constant monitoring technology like Medtronic's Guardian makes it a snap as long as it's working. I had my pump's catheter pulled out a few times during DTAC so you have to be ready for that stuff to happen.

                      Third, you have to know yourself and your your body, insulin and your BG react to exercise and missed meals. BG is usually LOWERED by prolonged exercise, anything over 30 mins, but is actually RAISED by short intense exercise, anything 20 mins or less. YOU however may react differently. You do Crossfit so you should have an idea how you react to exercise, you should go a day fasting so you know what happens if you miss breakfast and lunch. I kept cyclist's glucose blocks in my pocket instead of the glucose tablets, they're quieter, and granola bars in my kit in case I missed a meal I could slam one during a bathroom break.

                      Fourth, while doing all this DO NOT use your condition as an excuse to slack, miss required events or fail to pull your weight. Everybody has to run to the restroom occasionally, gets a bloody nose or hand during DTAC, etc. Having to step out once or twice is fine. If you're constantly taking timeouts it's not fair to your classmates and it's not fair to YOU. On the street you don't have the opportunity to take a timeout. You need to figure out, quickly, how to do what you need to do WITHOUT impacting your ability to perform consistently and at a moment's notice.
                      "I am a Soldier. I fight where I'm told and I win where I fight." -- GEN George S. Patton, Jr.

                      "With a brother on my left and a sister on my right, we face…. We face what no one should face. We face, so no one else would face. We are in the face of Death." -- Holli Peet

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by tanksoldier View Post
                        Patriot91 PMed me but I decided to post here so as to be of use to other applicants as well.

                        Much depends on the type of academy, your individual physiology and the method you use to control the disease.

                        The biggest consideration is what TYPE of academy you're attending: "college style" vs "paramilitary".

                        I was on a pump as well and I attended a relaxed college style academy. It had it's difficult moments but we didn't have TAC officers or the like bothering us between blocks of instruction, and during classroom days we could eat and drink at our desks. That made it very easy to monitor my blood sugar and take corrective action if needed.

                        However, that wasn't ALWAYS the case. Defensive Tactics was 8 hours of instruction a day, with the only real break at lunch. Driving and shooting alternated mornings and afternoons with half the class at each, and there were really no reliable, good breaks to test my BG. PT was usually Crossfit style and lasted anywhere from 20 minutes to an hour depending.

                        A paramilitary style academy, such as many of my co-workers attended, likely would have much fewer opportunities for testing and correction.

                        First, I would suggest you tell your instructors, offline, that you're diabetic. If everything goes to Hell they have to know what's wrong and what to do to keep you alive.

                        Second, you have to take whatever opportunities you have to monitor and correct your BG. That may mean not going out and smoking and joking during breaks, or whatever. Monitor and correct at every opportunity. A pump makes that very easy, a constant monitoring technology like Medtronic's Guardian makes it a snap as long as it's working. I had my pump's catheter pulled out a few times during DTAC so you have to be ready for that stuff to happen.

                        Third, you have to know yourself and your your body, insulin and your BG react to exercise and missed meals. BG is usually LOWERED by prolonged exercise, anything over 30 mins, but is actually RAISED by short intense exercise, anything 20 mins or less. YOU however may react differently. You do Crossfit so you should have an idea how you react to exercise, you should go a day fasting so you know what happens if you miss breakfast and lunch. I kept cyclist's glucose blocks in my pocket instead of the glucose tablets, they're quieter, and granola bars in my kit in case I missed a meal I could slam one during a bathroom break.

                        Fourth, while doing all this DO NOT use your condition as an excuse to slack, miss required events or fail to pull your weight. Everybody has to run to the restroom occasionally, gets a bloody nose or hand during DTAC, etc. Having to step out once or twice is fine. If you're constantly taking timeouts it's not fair to your classmates and it's not fair to YOU. On the street you don't have the opportunity to take a timeout. You need to figure out, quickly, how to do what you need to do WITHOUT impacting your ability to perform consistently and at a moment's notice.
                        Thank you for the information, it's honestly very informative and I will without a doubt take note of what you have to say. Do you have a link to the glucose you use for low BS? I have these gels, but they arn't the tastiest lol.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I use the Clif Shot Blocks, in various flavors:

                          http://www.amazon.com/Clif-Shot-Blok.../dp/B0021AEX3W

                          The granola bars I use are these:

                          http://www.amazon.com/Nature-Valley-.../dp/B005VOOOR0

                          I keep a pack of gels in my cargo pocket, and more gels and two bars in each duty bag/ go bag/ etc I have set up in my duty vehicle and POV. They're as important to me as spare magazines... and like a spare mag the idea is not to use them because I'm keeping my BG under control.
                          Last edited by tanksoldier; 12-21-2014, 11:41 PM.
                          "I am a Soldier. I fight where I'm told and I win where I fight." -- GEN George S. Patton, Jr.

                          "With a brother on my left and a sister on my right, we face…. We face what no one should face. We face, so no one else would face. We are in the face of Death." -- Holli Peet

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by tanksoldier View Post
                            I use the Clif Shot Blocks, in various flavors:

                            http://www.amazon.com/Clif-Shot-Blok.../dp/B0021AEX3W

                            The granola bars I use are these:

                            http://www.amazon.com/Nature-Valley-.../dp/B005VOOOR0

                            I keep a pack of gels in my cargo pocket, and more gels and two bars in each duty bag/ go bag/ etc I have set up in my duty vehicle and POV. They're as important to me as spare magazines... and like a spare mag the idea is not to use them because I'm keeping my BG under control.
                            Nature Valley...you have good taste my friend And by the way this is EXACTLY what I was looking for in terms of something to get BS up quickly thanks a million.
                            Last edited by Patriot91; 12-22-2014, 07:59 PM.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              If you can get your endo to prescribe you a continuous glucose monitor (CGM) it will help show you in graph form how your body is reacting to the exercise and down time.

                              I went through paramilitary style academy and it sucked but that was before the pump so it should be easier for you. Feel free to pm me if you have any questions. BTW congrats

                              Comment

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