Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Radio ear, I don't get it.

Collapse

300x250 Mobile

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Radio ear, I don't get it.

    I've been on the job for almost 2 weeks now (Corrections) and I cannot for the life of me understand what they are saying on the radio.
    I know most of my ten-codes but I have absolutely no understanding of the muffled nonsense coming from the speaker.
    My FTO calls it radio ear and he said I will get it eventually but I'm starting to seriously get worried. Any ways to speed up the process?

  • #2
    Don't just listen to it on duty. Listen to it on your off duty. That is the only way to get better and faster at it.

    Comment


    • #3
      Your FTO told you correctly. I had four years on when I went from Dept A to Dept B and I had no idea what the dispatcher was saying at my new dept (different radio systems or something, I don't know), but you will catch on. If you are sitting in the car and not doing other things, closely listen to what is being said on the radio. Sometimes I asked, "what did he just say" in order to help put some sound recognition/identification references into my head. Hang in there!

      Comment


      • #4
        I listen to my channel and 3 other zones with up to 4 departments on the each of the other zones. When it gets hectic, I turn scan off, but for the most part, I know whats going on in all the surrounding towns. Once you get used to it, it's not a problem. I guess several years of dispatching helped.
        Being a good street cop is like coming to work in a wet suit and peeing in your pants. It's a nice warm feeling, but you're the only one who knows anything has happened.

        Comment


        • #5
          It will come.........................
          Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

          My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

          Comment


          • #6
            I can drive around listening to the car FM radio, while talking on my cell phone, and still hear every call that comes over the radio without actively listening. It just takes your brain time to get used to it, almost like learning a foreign language. Once you get it, you got it for good.
            “Every society gets the kind of criminal it deserves. What is equally true is that every community gets the kind of law enforcement it insists on.” - Robert F. Kennedy.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by NYCDep View Post
              I can drive around listening to the car FM radio, while talking on my cell phone, and still hear every call that comes over the radio without actively listening.
              AND a scanner monitoring neighboring agencies.......................
              Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

              My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

              Comment


              • #8
                To clarify, is the sound muffled to the point that even if you're paying attention and have no distractions you can't understand what's being said?
                I miss you, Dave.
                http://www.odmp.org/officer/20669-of...david-s.-moore

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by ANON-CO View Post
                  I've been on the job for almost 2 weeks now (Corrections) and I cannot for the life of me understand what they are saying on the radio.
                  I know most of my ten-codes but I have absolutely no understanding of the muffled nonsense coming from the speaker.
                  My FTO calls it radio ear and he said I will get it eventually but I'm starting to seriously get worried. Any ways to speed up the process?
                  One thing I've noticed that helps greatly is speaking to people in person. Nine times out of ten, you'll hear nothing but garbling from someone until you speak to them face-to-face, even only once. After that, it'll be easier for you to understand them.

                  I'm not sure how it works but it works. I assume its your brain saving speech nuances and turns of phrase in order to make patterns out of chaos.
                  There once was a man who said: "Though,
                  it seems that I know that I know,
                  what I'd like to see is the I that knows me,
                  when I know that I know that I know."

                  - Alan Watts

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by CruiserClass View Post
                    To clarify, is the sound muffled to the point that even if you're paying attention and have no distractions you can't understand what's being said?
                    That's the pertinent followup question.

                    If you're actively paying attention do you STILL have problems, or do you just miss the stuff said while you're focusing on something else?

                    If you're actively paying attention the "Huh?" moments will still occur, but if they are constant you may have some kind of underlying problem... or maybe your radios just suck. Ours do. They're just bad. Then you have to learn to relate the gibberish to actual English phrases. Most things that get said on the radio are variations of a few themes: Open a cell or door, respond to Pod x, y or Z, etc, etc. If you can figure that out the rest will come with time.

                    The ability to pay attention WITHOUT paying attention, that takes time.
                    "I am a Soldier. I fight where I'm told and I win where I fight." -- GEN George S. Patton, Jr.

                    "With a brother on my left and a sister on my right, we face…. We face what no one should face. We face, so no one else would face. We are in the face of Death." -- Holli Peet

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I've been at it for 15 years and I still ask myself, from time to time, what did he/she just say? To which I generally answer "I have no earthly idea."

                      But there is something to talking with folks in person. I once worked where I talked with four ladies from the same office over the phone and I could not tell them apart even after months. After I met them in person they didn't sound anything alike and I could tell them apart over the phone after just a word or two.
                      Officer Jay McGuire, Minneapolis Park Police EOW 5/14/2009 age 11
                      Among Texas' finest
                      Deputy Andy Taylor, Llano County SO EOW 5/9/2005
                      Senior Deputy Jessica Laura Hollis, Travis County SO EOW 9/18/2014
                      Darren H. Goforth, Harris County SO EOW 8/28/2015

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        For me, it fell into place as I started to become familiar with my surroundings. At first I couldn't for the life of me remember which unit had just called in or where they were going, because those were just random words and numbers. Once I could visualize what street they were on and who they were, it was a snap.

                        When you get to know what time of day the inmates go where, who works what section, and what the slang is at your institution, the radio traffic will make more sense. And the more familiar you become with the voices of your co-workers, the less difficulty you will have figuring out what syllables they just spit into the mic.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          It will come with time. Even after several years on the job, I switched agencies and it took a while for me to adapt.
                          In God We Trust
                          Everyone else we run local and NCIC

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Alot of my co workers have very thick accents, there is one in particular that EVERYONE has difficulty understanding and the dispatchers are constantly asking him to repeat himself. IMO it's a safety hazard and I'm not sure why the guy was hired. Otherwise, I agree with the others--it will get better with time and you get to know your co workers' speech patterns etc
                            Judge me by the enemies I have made----Unknown

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              As he mentioned hes working in corrections,The radios atleast the ones we had were old and just bad radios.

                              The only time they ever got replaced was if one happened to slide up against a wall during a conflict hard enough to break it

                              Comment

                              MR300x250 Tablet

                              Collapse

                              What's Going On

                              Collapse

                              There are currently 4613 users online. 257 members and 4356 guests.

                              Most users ever online was 26,947 at 07:36 PM on 12-29-2019.

                              Welcome Ad

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X