Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

How much law do new recuits need to know for oral boards? ...and related questions.

Collapse

300x250 Mobile

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • How much law do new recuits need to know for oral boards? ...and related questions.

    Thank you in advance for your consideration of my questions!

    All questions are general in nature, but asked with Southern California departments in mind.

    1) How much law do new recruits need to know for oral boards? Are new recruits (not laterals) expected to know anything beyond the most general legal concepts (force continuum, "partner steals a candy bar", etc.)? Would the board ever ask a questions like "Can you name four criminal traffic violations?"

    2) Do rookie police officers learn (most) everything they know about laws during police academy?

    3) Where can I begin to study the California laws prior to academy? Is there a resource that is slightly less arcane than simply reading a list of penal codes?

    4) Do most Southern California agencies/academies require recruits to learn 10-codes? I was advised that some departments are pushing to switch to plain English. I have also noticed that there are various regional dialects of 10-codes is there a name for the 10-codes used in Southern California? I have the same questions regarding vehicle codes.

    5) Once working as a rookie patrol officer, what type of crimes/incidents would generally prompt an officer to request the assistance of a supervisor?


    ...again, thank you!
    Last edited by Goodpoint; 09-14-2014, 08:46 PM.

  • #2
    Hiring and recruitment questions sub-forum is here: http://forums.officer.com/f198/
    I miss you, Dave.
    http://www.odmp.org/officer/20669-of...david-s.-moore

    Comment


    • #3
      In CA, you will take the standard POST test. There is no requirement that you have any legal knowledge for entry level positions. As to your other questions, all will be revealed in the academy and FTO.
      Now go home and get your shine box!

      Comment


      • #4
        Thank you CCCSD. The information is very much appreciated.

        Comment


        • #5
          You don't need to know any law at interview

          You will be taught what you do need to know

          Don't bother studying laws before you are hired

          Don't worry about 10 codes-------------if your agency uses them you will be taught

          You will ask for a supervisor when you aren't sure what to do
          Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

          My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

          Comment


          • #6
            Familiarity with the Bill of Rights may be in order. I was asked basic questions about the 1st and 4th Amendments on separate occasions.

            Comment


            • #7
              Useful advice. Thank you!

              Comment


              • #8
                You're asking good questions and obviously putting some thought into this career. Rather than reading up on laws, I would maybe read some books about police work as a career. There's a short book called "101 Reasons You Should Not Become a Cop." I read that one before I ever interviewed. There's another one called "I Love a Cop." That one was given to our spouses at orientation. Another good one is "On Combat" by Lt. Col. Dave Grossman.

                Learn as much as you can about any department/city/county/state you apply to. Start with the agency's website. Also try to do a ride-along before you interview.

                If you make it to an oral board, wear a suit, polish your shoes, think about the questions before responding, and answer with confidence. I also recommend you start some kind of exercise regimen, maybe mixed with some martial arts/self defense. When I had my oral board they asked me what I had done to physically prepare myself for work as a police officer, and I was able to tell them I was doing entry level Krav Maga as well as Crossfit. But even if you just tell them, I'm running 3 miles 3 times a week and increasing my pushups, it shows you're putting forth the effort.

                Best of luck.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Goodpoint View Post
                  How much law do new recruits need to know for oral boards
                  In California, most orals score you on the following:
                  • Experience – assesses your ability and experience in accepting responsibilities and performing assigned tasks as demonstrated through achievements in work, school, and other activities.
                  • Problem Solving – assesses your reasoning skills in developing timely, logical responses to a wide variety of situations and problems.
                  • Communication Skills – assesses your oral communications skills, which includes speaking, listening, and non-verbal communication.
                  • Interest/Motivation – addresses your interest in and preparedness for the peace officer job. It includes an assessment of your general level of interest, initiative, and goal orientation.
                  • Interpersonal Skills – assesses many facets, such as social knowledge/appropriateness, social insight, empathy, social influence, social self-regulation, sociability, team orientation, social self-confidence, conflict management skills, and negotiating skills.
                  • Community Involvement/Awareness – focuses specifically on your experiences and interest in community issues, as well as your interest in and ability to fill multiple roles and serve a diverse community.

                  Originally posted by Goodpoint View Post
                  Do rookie police officers learn (most) everything they know about laws during police academy?
                  Prior to being hired I got the majority of my legal knowledge in the john. I kept my law books in the bathroom and every time I went in I opened the penal code, vehicle code or rules of evidence instead of a magazine. It’s amazing how much you can learn that way. Just don’t sty so long that you start getting hemorrhoids.

                  Originally posted by Goodpoint View Post
                  Where can I begin to study the California laws prior to academy? Is there a resource that is slightly less arcane than simply reading a list of penal codes?
                  Somewhere in your community there should be a law library that is open to the public. Within it you will find West’s or Deering’s annotated codes. These are basically law books that contain short summaries after each law that explain how the courts have interpreted and applied each specific law. They are extremely informative because you may find that while a law says ABC is prohibited, the courts may have declared they will only convict is ABCDE&F is done. In other cases, the law may say MN&O is required for a conviction, but you will find that courts have said XY&Z is the same as MN&O and they will give you a conviction for that as well. Each summary will give you the specific case citation to back it up and you can go elsewhere in the law library to read the decision in detail and understand the court’s logic.

                  This is a good thing to do as it gives you more than a mechanical knowledge of the law. You come away with an understand of how the court interprets and applies the law. This is important as you would be amazed at how many rookies misinterpret the law. You will also gain an understanding of many obscure loopholes and niceties in the law that will allow you to do things most people think are prohibited, and keep you from engaging in prohibited acts most folks are unaware of.

                  Do this enough and you will become a keeper of obscure knowledge. When people are faced with a legal problem and don’t know how to solve it, they will know to go to Goodpoint, because he knows all the obscure stuff that can usually help you accomplish your goals legally. At this point you become akin to a one eyed man in the land of the blind.

                  As a side note, don’t limit your studies to the penal code, vehicle code, h&s code, and evidence. Also look at the government code as California government itself runs on it. Similarly, look at the civil code so you can differentiate between criminal matters, which the police handle and civil matters, which are handled between private attorneys. Also study the labor code as there will be times when you will be faced with issues involving your own working conditions and workers comp matters. It is better to understand the laws regarding these areas ahead of time than be ignorant and feel you are getting screwed (when most likely you are not).

                  Originally posted by Goodpoint View Post
                  Once working as a rookie patrol officer, what type of crimes/incidents would generally prompt an officer to request the assistance of a supervisor?
                  Mostly issues where there is a question as to whether the matter is civil or criminal. It will usually involve something where payment was made and the goods were never received or not as promised. Was it criminal fraud or a dispute as to what was agreed upon? Other issues may involve trespass on property where use or existence of a right of way may be in dispute. No set of laws can be written so thoroughly as to anticipate every situation, so there will be times when you have to call the guy with the stripes.
                  Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    The answer to # 5 is after you looked in your departments manual for the answer.

                    I soon realized why Grizzly Old Grumpy Sgt's are they way they are. To keep the new guys from asking basic questions all the time instead of figuring the job out themselves.

                    There are certain circumstances where notification is required or is a good idea...oddly enough most situations where it is required are in your manual....soooo.....

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      All of this advice is sincerely appreciated. I am taking it to heart and will absolutely study the codes and concepts that you have suggested. Thank you!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        first off the two things you described are different. " a partner steals a candy bar' is a personal integrity question, the use of force continuum is usually a departmental policy which is followed by after being hired. most use of force continuums are the same but may vary between different agencies.


                        Usually an applicant that will be sent to the academy as a cadet, will not need any prior knowledge for an oral board. they understand you to not have any prior knowledge of code of criminal procedure, penal code, or transportation code etc... a recruit that is in a oral board who IS in the academy may be expected to have some basic knowledge of each topic that is taught. above all be honest. I know you would want to impress them but don't act like you know anything if you don't you end up looking dumb.
                        sigpic

                        "When a police officer is killed, it's not an agency that loses an officer, it's an entire nation." -Chris Cosgriff, ODMP Founder

                        http://www.odmp.org/

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          i'm pretty sure almost anyone can name four traffic violations.
                          sigpic

                          "When a police officer is killed, it's not an agency that loses an officer, it's an entire nation." -Chris Cosgriff, ODMP Founder

                          http://www.odmp.org/

                          Comment

                          MR300x250 Tablet

                          Collapse

                          What's Going On

                          Collapse

                          There are currently 5414 users online. 368 members and 5046 guests.

                          Most users ever online was 26,947 at 07:36 PM on 12-29-2019.

                          Welcome Ad

                          Collapse
                          Working...
                          X