Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Is P.E in highschool necessary?

Collapse

300x250 Mobile

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • matt_m
    replied
    Originally posted by hemicop View Post
    Matt, since we're getting specific here, long, long ago when I decided to pursue LE as a career I set several goals for myself. I was considerably bigger than you, but the point is, IMO you need to up your goals. Your 1.5 mile run, IMO< should be somewhere between 8.5 & 10 mins flat. your sit-ups & push-ups should be in the 30-35/min. range & your bench should be about 80% or more of your weight. Plan on being able to run an obstacle course which usually means a 6' wall, horizontal ladder, tire obstacles & perhaps a weight drag, usually somewhere around 180lbs. This will all be in addition to your physical test, so you see the need for conditioning.
    I'm not trying to scare you into anything, only let you know what to expect. I had a good friend several years ago that asked me to help him train for our OD testing. He did pretty well in the running but grossly lacked upper body strength & coordination to negotiate an obstacle course. If it were me, I check with the PD, see what their requirements are & at least try to excede them by about 50%. That way when you get to your Oral & if they ask "How did you prepare to get on the Dept.?" you'll have a very specific response &, with a little luck, your PT scores will prove it. Good Luck!
    Hey there. I actually just tested myself yesterday to get an idea of where I'm at with things. I was able to go above and beyond what you mentioned with the pushups, situps, and bench for my weight. I have no troubles pulling myself up from places, upper body strength is where I excel compared to legs. I'm not sure how I would do on the weight drag though, haven't tested myself there yet. There is always improvements to be made though, so I'll get that even higher. I will definitely go to the PD to get the requirements, I'm gonna be there in a couple months every day for school (Hopefully!) so I'll get a chance. Thanks for the insight.

    Leave a comment:


  • hemicop
    replied
    Matt, since we're getting specific here, long, long ago when I decided to pursue LE as a career I set several goals for myself. I was considerably bigger than you, but the point is, IMO you need to up your goals. Your 1.5 mile run, IMO< should be somewhere between 8.5 & 10 mins flat. your sit-ups & push-ups should be in the 30-35/min. range & your bench should be about 80% or more of your weight. Plan on being able to run an obstacle course which usually means a 6' wall, horizontal ladder, tire obstacles & perhaps a weight drag, usually somewhere around 180lbs. This will all be in addition to your physical test, so you see the need for conditioning.
    I'm not trying to scare you into anything, only let you know what to expect. I had a good friend several years ago that asked me to help him train for our OD testing. He did pretty well in the running but grossly lacked upper body strength & coordination to negotiate an obstacle course. If it were me, I check with the PD, see what their requirements are & at least try to excede them by about 50%. That way when you get to your Oral & if they ask "How did you prepare to get on the Dept.?" you'll have a very specific response &, with a little luck, your PT scores will prove it. Good Luck!

    Leave a comment:


  • matt_m
    replied
    Originally posted by Gradient Shift View Post
    BTW, don't just train to 1.5 mile run. My running advice is start low (1 mile will work) and increase to at least double whatever is required at a rate of no more than 10% each week when you can run the entire distance without stopping and feeling like you are going to die afterward.

    I mentioned interval running above, do it, it helps a lot. There are a lot of phone apps out there that will help you manage your interval runs and log your runs in general; personally, I use Endomondo. There was some research that intervals of 30 seconds walking, 20 seconds jogging, 10 seconds sprinting is the best training interval program to use. You want to feel absolutely exhausted immediately after an interval run, but it shouldn't follow you around for too long afterward.
    Sweet, good tips. I'll take a look at that app. Back in grade 9 when I didn't exercise whatsoever I ""ran"" (Double quoting because you also quoted ran) a mile in 13 minutes, which i'm sure I could have done better I just really didn't care to do so. Now I'm guessing I could do it in about 10 minutes or so. I'll look back on your posts when I start going for some runs just as a refresher. That's right, I won't train for simply 1.5, I would like to aim towards 5K that way whatever the test is should be a joke.

    Leave a comment:


  • matt_m
    replied
    Originally posted by PhilipCal View Post
    Matt, Don't know too much about PE in high school, it's been over fifty years. That said, physical conditioning is a plus in any occupation, but an absolute MUST in this profession. Keep that in mind as you progress toward your career. Best of luck.
    For sure Philip (Assuming your name IS Philip), I'm well aware of that, I was basically checking about how it looks on paper; obviously from the posts most recruiters don't even check your highschool transcripts. Thanks
    Last edited by matt_m; 07-12-2014, 04:30 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gradient Shift
    replied
    BTW, don't just train to 1.5 mile run. My running advice is start low (1 mile will work) and increase to at least double whatever is required at a rate of no more than 10% each week when you can run the entire distance without stopping and feeling like you are going to die afterward.

    I mentioned interval running above, do it, it helps a lot. There are a lot of phone apps out there that will help you manage your interval runs and log your runs in general; personally, I use Endomondo. There was some research that intervals of 30 seconds walking, 20 seconds jogging, 10 seconds sprinting is the best training interval program to use. You want to feel absolutely exhausted immediately after an interval run, but it shouldn't follow you around for too long afterward.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gradient Shift
    replied
    Originally posted by matt_m View Post
    I'll start running soon if that's the case, don't think my cardio is the best at the moment when it comes to running.
    Dude, that's even more of a reason to get out there and start running now.

    Do you know how long it took me to "run" 1.5 miles? Over 20 minutes and I thought I was going to die when I stumbled into my apartment. Keep in mind this was despite the fact that I would spend 30 to 60 minutes riding a bike about five times a week for several months prior. The bike did not prepare me the challenges I would face running.

    I kept at it, made realistic goals, did research on how to improve (protip: intervals), wore proper footwear, and took breaks when I thought my body needed rest or forced me to (shin splints = no bueno). When I did my very first and only police department test about a year later in December of 2012, I ran the 1.5 mile in roughly 10:30. While I did take a break from running due to the weather this last winter I started running again when I advanced to the background process this last February. Now, after several months and in my early thirties, I am close to being back to where I was when I tested in '12. While I enjoy running, I still need to force myself out there.

    If an older dude like myself can do that you will be doing a 1.5 mile run in 9 minutes in no time. As a bonus, by the time you do test with a department and start the academy, running won't be something you force yourself to do, it will be part of your life style.
    Last edited by Gradient Shift; 07-12-2014, 03:55 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • PhilipCal
    replied
    Matt, Don't know too much about PE in high school, it's been over fifty years. That said, physical conditioning is a plus in any occupation, but an absolute MUST in this profession. Keep that in mind as you progress toward your career. Best of luck.

    Leave a comment:


  • matt_m
    replied
    Originally posted by Gradient Shift View Post
    Most people have fond memories of dodgeball in P.E. class. It was the great equalizer. Teams were randomly picked/assigned. You didn't need to be fast on your feet, jump high, or even have super quick reflexes. I can remember many a games during my youth where some of the least athletic kids were playground hero's for the day/week because of their save in a game.

    Dodgeball is relevant because dodgeball is awesome. Full stop.


    I would suggest you run periodically. When I first start training a few years ago I was using a bike for cadrio and it was ok, but it was nothing compared to actually running; human kinetics while running is vastly different than while on a bike. You may also have a period where various parts of your anatomy (i.e., ankles, shins, calves) will really hurt after running. Sometimes these issues only present themselves after spending some time running and then take time to go away. It is best you jump that hurdle now while you have the time and youth so as to prevent getting knocked out of a test/academy due to an injury down the road.

    Take myself for example, while I am waiting for my academy to begin I have been pushing myself to get my running back to where it was a year and a half ago when I tested. After months of running only recently did I stop having discomfort in my ankles after running over 3 miles. This is crucial for myself because the academy I will be attending is very physical and fitness is paramount, especially running. After all, they have a sign hanging up which reads, "If you choose law enforcement you lose the right to be unfit" and requires all officers to pass an annual fitness test.

    If you have enough weight equipment at home to meet your needs, consider getting a program like P90X, Body Beast, or similar instead of getting a gym membership. Some gyms are either more expensive than your actual needs and/or give members a hard time when attempting to cancel their membership. I work out at home and am in decent shape; I can do over 100 consecutive push-ups, 55 sit-ups in a minute, 25 consecutive pull-ups, etc. I don't have a bench-press at home, but from using a friends I know I can do well over my body weight. The only equipment I have is a pull-up bar, a workout bench, adjustable free weights that go from 5 to 52.5 lbs, and a DVD player.

    Oh, the department I will be starting the academy for did not look at my high school transcripts, and did not care that I had zero P.E. credits during college. I passed their physical fitness test and that is what they cared about.

    Best of luck.
    Right on.. I was pretty good at dodge ball myself back in grade school. I appreciate the reply, it's more of the position I'm in. I like to workout at home, also I looked at body beast before but I don't have a place I can mount a pull-up bar anywhere in the house, and don't have the room for some of the required equipment. I have my own workout schedule made up though. My dad was a body builder for 13+ years and scored third in a competition back in the day, so he helped hook one up. I'll start running soon if that's the case, don't think my cardio is the best at the moment when it comes to running. Thanks for the help and input

    Leave a comment:


  • Gradient Shift
    replied
    Originally posted by matt_m View Post
    Oh.. and to the others, I never said anything about dodge ball lol, not sure why that seems to be the main topic on this thread; you guys can have your own fun though
    Most people have fond memories of dodgeball in P.E. class. It was the great equalizer. Teams were randomly picked/assigned. You didn't need to be fast on your feet, jump high, or even have super quick reflexes. I can remember many a games during my youth where some of the least athletic kids were playground hero's for the day/week because of their save in a game.

    Dodgeball is relevant because dodgeball is awesome. Full stop.


    I would suggest you run periodically. When I first start training a few years ago I was using a bike for cadrio and it was ok, but it was nothing compared to actually running; human kinetics while running is vastly different than while on a bike. You may also have a period where various parts of your anatomy (i.e., ankles, shins, calves) will really hurt after running. Sometimes these issues only present themselves after spending some time running and then take time to go away. It is best you jump that hurdle now while you have the time and youth so as to prevent getting knocked out of a test/academy due to an injury down the road.

    Take myself for example, while I am waiting for my academy to begin I have been pushing myself to get my running back to where it was a year and a half ago when I tested. After months of running only recently did I stop having discomfort in my ankles after running over 3 miles. This is crucial for myself because the academy I will be attending is very physical and fitness is paramount, especially running. After all, they have a sign hanging up which reads, "If you choose law enforcement you lose the right to be unfit" and requires all officers to pass an annual fitness test.

    If you have enough weight equipment at home to meet your needs, consider getting a program like P90X, Body Beast, or similar instead of getting a gym membership. Some gyms are either more expensive than your actual needs and/or give members a hard time when attempting to cancel their membership. I work out at home and am in decent shape; I can do over 100 consecutive push-ups, 55 sit-ups in a minute, 25 consecutive pull-ups, etc. I don't have a bench-press at home, but from using a friends I know I can do well over my body weight. The only equipment I have is a pull-up bar, a workout bench, adjustable free weights that go from 5 to 52.5 lbs, and a DVD player.

    Oh, the department I will be starting the academy for did not look at my high school transcripts, and did not care that I had zero P.E. credits during college. I passed their physical fitness test and that is what they cared about.

    Best of luck.

    Leave a comment:


  • matt_m
    replied
    Originally posted by hemicop View Post
    ABSOLUTELY! Between the Academy & your actual assignment you'll be required to demonstrate some level of physical conditioning. Plus stats have shown an in-shape LEO is less likely to be assaulted, lives longer & (like it or not) appearence plays into getting promoted. Your fellow LEOs will expect you to carry your own weight in terms of handling combative situations & failing to be able to is a quick way to be "black balled". Police work takes a physical & psychological toll on you over the years & you need to be able to deal with it. Take your PE class, continue the regimen after school & even while you're on the job. I've been in LE 35+ years now & still go to the gym 3-5 times a week. I can guarantee you the criminals are working out in the jails & prisons & they're not doing it for fun......
    That's right, without a doubt physical appearance plays a roll in life and the job. I'll have to work on it, as I said to the guy above I couldn't get into the gym at the beginning of this year, I couldn't lift as much as I could at home, I prefer to workout by myself.. I'll do my stuff at home, and when I get more comfortable I'll switch to the gym! I'm basically speaking aloud. Thanks for the reply
    Last edited by matt_m; 07-12-2014, 10:40 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • matt_m
    replied
    Originally posted by sixersfan View Post
    NO ONE is going to look at your high school transcripts. Being in shape IS very important, but there are a million better ways to do that than a high school gym class. Riding a bike is a good start, but adding running and weight lifting into your life will get you into the shape you need to be in. You still have another year of high school left, and then 4 to 5 years of college after that. Start training right now, and you'll be in great shape when the time comes to start applying. You won't regret it!
    Thanks. Yes I know this is important, the main question was about P.E being on paper. Biking is really only for my cardio, and a bit of legs - though i know biking isn't the best for building legs especially when you're riding on the road. I do have a bench, free weight rack, ez-curl bar and some dumbbells for working out at home, I can do 30-50 pushups randomly.. most I've done was 70, and I believe I can go a while with sit-ups, haven't really counted though. I only actually have 3-4 years until I go applying seeing as one more year of H.S as you said, and then 2 years of law and security in college.. I couldn't get into the gym too much at the beginning of the year, but I'll have to start up again sometime. I'm only 125 pounds, being 5'7-5'9, somewhere in between there, but I look like I am a bit more than that. anytime somebody asks they are surprised I am 125, but I would obviously like to bring that weight up.. hoping i'm not done growing yet. Plus I wouldn't consider myself weak by any means, I'm not sure why the number is so low lol.
    Oh.. and to the others, I never said anything about dodge ball lol, not sure why that seems to be the main topic on this thread; you guys can have your own fun though
    Last edited by matt_m; 07-12-2014, 10:52 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • hemicop
    replied
    ABSOLUTELY! Between the Academy & your actual assignment you'll be required to demonstrate some level of physical conditioning. Plus stats have shown an in-shape LEO is less likely to be assaulted, lives longer & (like it or not) appearence plays into getting promoted. Your fellow LEOs will expect you to carry your own weight in terms of handling combative situations & failing to be able to is a quick way to be "black balled". Police work takes a physical & psychological toll on you over the years & you need to be able to deal with it. Take your PE class, continue the regimen after school & even while you're on the job. I've been in LE 35+ years now & still go to the gym 3-5 times a week. I can guarantee you the criminals are working out in the jails & prisons & they're not doing it for fun......

    Leave a comment:


  • Magic Matt
    replied
    Ah, what? (can I answer this without getting band) no probably not....

    Leave a comment:


  • just joe
    replied
    I don't believe I actually read the original post. Dodge ball was the best part of gym.

    Leave a comment:


  • PoliceSeeker
    replied
    Originally posted by Gradient Shift View Post
    You know some schools have BANNED dodge ball? No joke.
    I got volleyball banned in my HS, no joke. I'm a pretty large guy, about 6'5 245, even in HS. I went up to spike the ball and the way I hit it in angled directly square into this girls face, and she blacked out for 15 seconds or so. I was always the kid pretending it was the Olympics in PE class.

    Leave a comment:

MR300x250 Tablet

Collapse

What's Going On

Collapse

There are currently 5122 users online. 310 members and 4812 guests.

Most users ever online was 158,966 at 04:57 AM on 01-16-2021.

Welcome Ad

Collapse
Working...
X