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  • Basic EMT certification and policing?

    So, the agency at which I'd like to end up (Probably not start for logistics reasons, but end up) has pushed back its requirements a bit. It's not by much, but it's enough that I'm going to have to pick up an extra semester of college before I hit the local Academy (the way I figure it, I'd better get all of my school in now, because I just won't have time for that on the job).

    That said, I'll elaborate on the subject of this post: would it make me look (even a little) more appealing to a potential Law Enforcement employer, if I go through the basic EMT program that my local college offers?

    Thanks in advance, O.com!

  • #2
    The EMT in and of itself, for more agencies, not so much. There are some, like all of agencies (past and present) where it was highly valued because that's what they expected of their officer (to serve a tri-role (fire/EMS)).

    For those agencies that don't expect that, it can still be spun as a positive. The easiest way to do that is to use it as an example of starting and finishing something. There are also other ways to spin being an EMT to an agency but I'm not to give away all the secrets of an interview.
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    • #3
      I wouldn't go to EMT class just to pad your resume. EMT skills rapidly degrade unless you use them. I imagine there is also an annual written protocol test and practical skills testing stations (such as drug bag, various types of airway management for trauma/non-trauma, adult and peds, etc.) Police cars don't carry O2, bronchodilators, vasoconstrictors, etc. Unless it is something the PD expects, don't expect them to care.

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      • #4
        In most places an EMT certification will be considered "Oh, that's nice" but nothing more.
        Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

        My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

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        • #5
          Alright, I'll leave the EMTing to the EMTs .

          Thanks again, guys.

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          • #6
            With the recent increase in active shooter events I strongly believe more EMS training for law enforcement is about to come to the forefront behind the strong push in active shooter training. Fire & EMS are not going into "hot" zones where a threat still exists. It may be up to LE to provide quick treatment to victims of shootings or explosive-related incidents. Mark my words, MORE EMS training is coming. LEOs need to start thinking "battlefield care" just as the military has been trained for years. I think LE agencies will look a little closer at those with any type of medical licensure identified by DOT (EMR, EMT, etc). Just my .02.
            I'm 10-8 like a shark in a sea of crime..

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            • #7
              I disagree. The push is not to do battlefield care. Any medical training that may come down the pike at some unknown time in the future won't have anything to do with licensure; it will simply be advanced first aid. In my area fire and EMS is training to go into a hot area (wearing ballistic vests and having a police escort). If anything, I see the police mission remaining the same and the EMS mission changing to accepting a more active role like a combat medic. We are already doing this with our squad and other squads in the area are doing it as well. If anything, I think you will see a paradigm shift in EMS.

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              • #8
                I'm with Scott on this one. I believe cops will be expected to know and do more. If for no other reason, it's probably easier to teach a cop some band-aid stuff than teach a medic physical fitness and tactics. (relax... I'm a medic, too...) Making a mistake with a tourniquet doesn't kill someone... bad tactics do. BUT.. I also agree with Joe, EMS will be asked to elevate their game and put themselves in harms way more than they have traditionally done. There aren't a whole lot of tactical medics out there, so both sides are going to have to do more in each others area.

                But anyway, to the OP: EMT training may not help, but it absolutely won't hurt. It's valuable training that regardless if you maintain your con-eds, is a life skill that can stay in your tool box forever.
                I know when we get some shenanigans in the field, my fellow officers take some comfort that I am there, god forbid something happens. I carry a small bag that can make big differences.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by just joe View Post
                  I disagree. The push is not to do battlefield care. Any medical training that may come down the pike at some unknown time in the future won't have anything to do with licensure; it will simply be advanced first aid. In my area fire and EMS is training to go into a hot area (wearing ballistic vests and having a police escort). If anything, I see the police mission remaining the same and the EMS mission changing to accepting a more active role like a combat medic. We are already doing this with our squad and other squads in the area are doing it as well. If anything, I think you will see a paradigm shift in EMS.
                  In larger jurisdictions I don't see them strapping body armor and weapons to firefighter/medics. If you look at the military they train certain individuals to be combat medics, but all have training in basic combat first aid. From a tactical and financial standpoint, it's going to be easier to medically train those already trained in weapons and tactics versus putting EMTs/FFs through tactical and weapons training just so they can enter a hostile area.

                  LEOs are already equipped with weapons and they're getting thoroughly trained in active shooter response. They are expected to enter the "hot" zone. I don't agree with sending Fire/EMS in with officers and risking further casualties. Most jurisdictions won't allow it and I don't see hardly any FF/EMS agencies equipping more of their personnel with weapons.

                  On a side note, I didn't say it required medical licensure, but in EMR you actually have to get checked off on a multitude of equipment and trauma/medical assessment before passing the class. You might as well put them through the 40-50 hour DOT course if you're going to train them at all. The basic AHA or ARC First Aid is ok, but I would much rather EMR if it were my personnel. Our officers are already EMR at minimum so it's not an issue with my agency.
                  Last edited by SgtScott31; 06-24-2014, 04:16 PM.
                  I'm 10-8 like a shark in a sea of crime..

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                  • #10
                    A full first responder course would be good, EMT MIGHT be depending on where you are and how involved you want to get.

                    Don't forget that the police academy gives college credit most places. Mine would have gotten me (IIRC) 38 semester units, 40 with the first-aid class which was extra. That's 2/3 of an AA degree right there.

                    Here, response times can be over 45 minutes so if you WANT to go EMT you'll probably find a use for it. In an urban area, probably not.

                    Skills DO degrade fast so if you want to stay up to snuff you'll want to sign on with a volunteer fire department, search & rescue or something.
                    "I am a Soldier. I fight where I'm told and I win where I fight." -- GEN George S. Patton, Jr.

                    "With a brother on my left and a sister on my right, we face…. We face what no one should face. We face, so no one else would face. We are in the face of Death." -- Holli Peet

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                    • #11
                      it might not help getting hired but in worst case situations it will help either you or your partners. But you have to remember what will the department cover you as. My department only covers us to what they train us which is first responder level in the event we help citizens. That was confirmed by several folks on the department. I was an EMT but my cert expired I was going to renew but it doesn't mean jack on the department. I might go back and get it again but I got other things to till then.
                      I'd rather be judged by 12 rather carried by 6.

                      It should be noted that any and all post that are made are based on my own thought and opinions. And are not related or implied to represent the department I work for.

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                      • #12
                        @SgtScott: I never said Fire would be trained in weapons, so that is a mute point. Large FDs also mean large PDs, so the police would more readily be able to absorb the pre hospital emergency care function than small and medium size depts. It is almost impossible to find an EMR class around here, let alone an EMR refresher (and EMR is a license). As with a lot of things, this issue may bifurcate by region and jurisdiction. I don't disagree that officers should have basic combat first aid training (I've had my EMT license for about 25 years now).

                        Good discussion.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by PSUMedic View Post
                          I'm with Scott on this one. I believe cops will be expected to know and do more. If for no other reason, it's probably easier to teach a cop some band-aid stuff than teach a medic physical fitness and tactics. (relax... I'm a medic, too...) Making a mistake with a tourniquet doesn't kill someone... bad tactics do. BUT.. I also agree with Joe, EMS will be asked to elevate their game and put themselves in harms way more than they have traditionally done. There aren't a whole lot of tactical medics out there, so both sides are going to have to do more in each others area.

                          But anyway, to the OP: EMT training may not help, but it absolutely won't hurt. It's valuable training that regardless if you maintain your con-eds, is a life skill that can stay in your tool box forever.
                          I know when we get some shenanigans in the field, my fellow officers take some comfort that I am there, god forbid something happens. I carry a small bag that can make big differences.

                          What do you carry in your bag?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by just joe View Post
                            @SgtScott: I never said Fire would be trained in weapons, so that is a mute point. Large FDs also mean large PDs, so the police would more readily be able to absorb the pre hospital emergency care function than small and medium size depts. It is almost impossible to find an EMR class around here, let alone an EMR refresher (and EMR is a license). As with a lot of things, this issue may bifurcate by region and jurisdiction. I don't disagree that officers should have basic combat first aid training (I've had my EMT license for about 25 years now).

                            Good discussion.
                            The EMR training is an issue in surrounding counties here as well. Seems that the County EMS Directors have a tight leash on who they allow to teach EMR and take the class; and they have the support of State EMS. I think that's going to have to change to fit the needs of LE. I believe there are some states out there that put their police officers through EMR as part of the law enforcement recruit training, but there's not many of them. I've been an EMT-IV a little over 13 years, but I'm also a AHA BLS and DOT EMR Instructor. We're sort of a hybrid. Although my agency is in a metro area we are a public safety dept and separate from the metro PD/FD. This allows me to teach the EMR course. Me and one of our paramedics, (who's an IC and can give our EMTs CEUs) renew everyone as well. Our medical director is also the metro FD/EMS medical director so we have a great working relationship. I agree that it may vary depending on the jurisdiction. I do feel strongly that whoever is going to be providing care needs to get ready for the mentality that they may have to do so when "scene safety," as we call it, is compromised. We just completed POST training and there was heavy focus on active shooter and tactical medical applications.
                            Last edited by SgtScott31; 06-24-2014, 06:41 PM.
                            I'm 10-8 like a shark in a sea of crime..

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                            • #15
                              I started off thinking this was kind of a dumb question. I'm learning plenty just from continuing to lurk this thread.

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