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What should happen to Child Protective Services

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  • sunnymw
    replied
    Oh yes, someone prosecutes them. After they are investigated by DFCS. I have no idea where these mysterious DFCS workers come from, because they sure aren't at the local DFCS office. All that happens there is people get assistance scanning pay stubs for food stamp applications, or people report food stamp fraud.

    So here it is... weeks later... I haven't gotten a letter on this case yet...

    Ya want, I'll PM you my county and you can find me a human being.

    Until then, this is what we have:
    http://dfcs.dhs.georgia.gov/child-abuse-neglect
    Even the person I spoke with on the phone said it was absolutely ridiculous.

    Leave a comment:


  • jdthor
    replied
    So your saying that no where in your county is there a CPS office and your DA doesnt have a investigator nor anyone who prosecutes child abuse cases ? and your sheriffs office or local PD doesnt have anyone who handles child abuse reports. I find that hard to believe.

    Leave a comment:


  • sunnymw
    replied
    I have the DA (district attorney)'s office and cell number in my phone already.

    The local DFCS office just handles medicaid and food stamps---and they don't actually handle that, they just help folks scan in their documents. If someone actually has an issue and needs to talk to someone, they need to call another 800# and wait on hold for HOURS (YES, HOURS) and pray they get someone competent.

    Leave a comment:


  • jdthor
    replied
    Sure theres a place in your county. Have you located the the county DAs number in the phone book ?

    Leave a comment:


  • sunnymw
    replied
    I think personally, in Georgia, communication would be cool.

    When I got called to a house where I felt a report for abuse was warranted (but the situation wasn't life threatening), I got to call the same 800 number that everyone else called. In a few weeks, I should get a "confirmation letter" in the mail at the PD letting me know what course of action they decided to take.

    There is nowhere in my town or my county where I can go and say "HEY, THERE IS A PROBLEM AT THIS HOUSE." Instead I talk to an operator, and eventually get a letter in the mail.

    Leave a comment:


  • PhilipCal
    replied
    Can't, won't argue with what my colleagues have noted to you. I will make this one observation though. You're painting with far too broad a brush. You should narrow your field considerably, and identify specific CPS agencies with specific problems.

    Leave a comment:


  • Iowa #1603
    replied
    Originally posted by Seventy2002 View Post

    In over 35 years as a cop I worked with many CPS caseworkers. During my assignment to investigations, I did so on a daily basis. I also spent several years on a multi-discipline board that reviewed CPS cases.

    Some of the best investigators I worked with anywhere were social workers. There were some flaky ones but my observation was they didn't last. They left the field or were reassigned. I saw that in law enforcement, too. It's a tough job. The caseworker can do everything right but if the client doesn't want to cooperate, well ... it's the caseworker's fault!

    In many cases, work was hampered by poor resources. Many CPS "clients" are highly mobile, crossing city, county, and state lines. A caseworker would have to snail-mail paper files to another office when the subject moved, assuming the caseworker knew where the subject was going. Sometimes the subject had moved yet again by the time the file arrived. Even when my state's CPS got a computer system, it was really clunky. One of my review cases involved a subject who dropped off the radar because the state stopped paying for a soundex routine on the search function.

    Things have gotten better since then but taxpayers are still stingy. One of the "CPS" articles I found is headlined: "legislators stall on plan to augment CPS."
    Seventy2002 pretty much speaks the truth

    I have yet to see a "CPS worker" who is not overwhelmed by their case load. { I will use the term CPS to include all agencies that "protect" children----In my state it is the Department of Human Service DHS}

    I often see the CPS worker come to court and ask me who is on the schedule because they are so busy they don;t know exactly who is to be worked today. These are good workers-----just overworked.

    The investigators and the case workers really do care, they often work gut wrenching cases that make SEASONED LEO INVESTIGATORS cry. These people rarely show their angst to the public. As an "insider" I see what they go through.

    I PERSONALLY have been involved with CPS as a CLIENT. Both of my children were adopted through CPS after being removed from their parental home for abuse. With in the last 2 yrs my GRANDSON was removed from our EX-daughter-in-law's home and rights were terminated due to neglect and abuse.

    Due to a lot of reason my wife and I adopted our Grandson last month............once again working with CPS

    Like Seventy2002 stated-----------RESOURCES.

    Leave a comment:


  • Seventy2002
    replied
    Originally posted by vc859 View Post
    It seems like child protective services throughout the United States has a pretty large problem.
    "CPS" is not a monolithic entity. We're talking about numerous, separate agencies with differences in mission, funding, and legal authority. They may based at state, county, or city level.

    From the article posted today ...
    Be specific. A Google news search for "Child Protective Services" gives six pages of hits for the last 24 hours. Some of the articles even refer to CPS doing good work. In any case, it's a big country where big numbers can pencil out to small percentages - but that would spoil the drama.

    From your professional dealings with them, do you see the same things? and if you think there is a problem, what would your solution be?
    In over 35 years as a cop I worked with many CPS caseworkers. During my assignment to investigations, I did so on a daily basis. I also spent several years on a multi-discipline board that reviewed CPS cases.

    Some of the best investigators I worked with anywhere were social workers. There were some flaky ones but my observation was they didn't last. They left the field or were reassigned. I saw that in law enforcement, too. It's a tough job. The caseworker can do everything right but if the client doesn't want to cooperate, well ... it's the caseworker's fault!

    In many cases, work was hampered by poor resources. Many CPS "clients" are highly mobile, crossing city, county, and state lines. A caseworker would have to snail-mail paper files to another office when the subject moved, assuming the caseworker knew where the subject was going. Sometimes the subject had moved yet again by the time the file arrived. Even when my state's CPS got a computer system, it was really clunky. One of my review cases involved a subject who dropped off the radar because the state stopped paying for a soundex routine on the search function.

    Things have gotten better since then but taxpayers are still stingy. One of the "CPS" articles I found is headlined: "legislators stall on plan to augment CPS."

    CPS should not be investigating anything;[SNIP] CPS's job should be case management and connecting families with services, which are things that a social worker is actually trained to do.
    As I said, the job's different different jurisdictions. In my state, CPS is an investigative agency. The caseworkers may have degrees in social work but they are also trained investigators. Case management and "connecting with services" are handled by another division of the state agency.

    I don't think the "CPS model" is broken, it just needs to be properly implemented and funded.

    Leave a comment:


  • vc859
    started a topic What should happen to Child Protective Services

    What should happen to Child Protective Services

    It seems like child protective services throughout the United States has a pretty large problem.

    From the article posted today about the teenager in New Jersey, to the Arizona CPS being shut down and reorganized to countless cases of children dying while in their care; and others being removed on questionable cause; it seems like CPS in many places is at best incompetent, at worst malicious and criminal. In fact, there are some agencies, that, were they law enforcement agencies, would be under federal consent decree from now to eternity

    From your professional dealings with them, do you see the same things? and if you think there is a problem, what would your solution be?

    Mine is I think the CPS model needs major changes. Namely, CPS should not be investigating anything; that should be the purview of law enforcement personnel either sworn or civilian. CPS's job should be case management and connecting families with services, which are things that a social worker is actually trained to do.

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