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  • Pulling over other LEOs

    Before I pose another question, I would like to say thanks to all the LEOs that stepped up to bat in the"Banned Chases" thread that I started a couple of weeks ago. Now to the question at hand.

    A while back, I remember reading an article about an officer that was suspended for giving his supervisor a traffic ticket. After reading that, some questions popped into my head. What is the "correct protocol" involving traffic stops of this nature? You pull over someone going fast or is aggressively driving and he turns out to be an officer on your force.

    To add on to the question, what if the person you pulled over happens to be an LEOs in a neigboring jurisdiction? For example, say a Police Officer for City A pulls over someone and that someone happens to be an officer for County A which borders/surrounds City A. What would normally be done in this instance? Once again, I know the answers may vary. However I know they will be knowledgeable and full of insight.

    THANKS
    "Do what you can stand."

  • #2
    What is the "correct protocol" involving traffic stops of this nature?
    This will be beating a dead horse...But the "proper protocol" is to treat the officer the same way you would treat any citizen. The right thing to do, however, would be to let the officer go, unless you or one of your colleagues received a ticket from that officer in the recent past, in which case the right thing to do would be to get revenge times 2.

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    • #3
      Generally speaking, unless your wife/girlfriend/sister/mother is sitting in the passenger seat smoking a cigarette with a satisfied look on thier face, you let him/her go on thier way.
      sigpic

      The art of war is simple enough. Find out where your enemy is. Get at him as soon as you can. Strike him as hard as you can, and keep moving on.-Ulysses S. Grant

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      • #4
        Law enforcement officers are not above the law. If you observe a LEO committing a traffic violation, you have to proceed just as you would with anyone else. The same applies to pulling over someone who ends up being your friend, or relative, or whatever.

        If the offence occurs while on duty, it should also be reported to that officer's supervisor.

        I actually watched an officer in my hometown park in a disabled parking space to run into a bank while on duty (this was a while ago - back when they were referred to as "handicapped spots"). My father and I took down the license and vehicle number and reported him to his sergeant.

        If anything, where I work, we are far more strict if we catch one of our own doing something wrong. We can't afford not to be - because it's guaranteed that if you let it slide, it will be caught on video.
        People always tell the truth. The trick is knowing what to listen for.

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        • #5
          um....what??
          "The price one pays for pursuing any profession, or calling, is an intimate knowledge of its ugly side."
          .....James Baldwin
          American Author.

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          • #6
            Law enforcement officers are not above the law. If you observe a LEO committing a traffic violation, you have to proceed just as you would with anyone else. The same applies to pulling over someone who ends up being your friend, or relative, or whatever.
            He's just kidding....Either that, or he's responsible for the revengeX2 caveat in the protocol.

            By the way, what do you mean by "If anything, where I work, we are far more strict if we catch one of our own doing something wrong."? That implies you're a policeman, when in fact, you're not...Sounds like you're just a little informant, and no one likes a snitch.
            Last edited by ; 07-15-2003, 03:45 PM.

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            • #7
              Frank, the fact that he's a part-time auxiliary officer with the campus police to "support himself" (his words) while he's in school should tell you something.

              Should "also" be reported to the supervisor if it happens on duty, Choppy? Does that mean you're prone to pulling over and ticketing marked units?

              It would have to be an egregious offense (such as hauling *** through a school zone, DUI, very reckless driving) before I ticketed another officer.

              Kristen

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              • #8
                Short of a major offense that I can't cover up, it'll be "Be safe, I'll see you on the road" and I'm heading back to my vehicle. Right or wrong.....you watch my back, I watch yours........beside, I'm looking to move on to another agency here in a year or two, don't wanna burn any possible connections.
                [email protected]
                ---------------------------

                It's better to die happy..........than just die

                May Tyr watch over and guide my hand each day.........to do the right thing

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                • #9
                  "My father and I took down the license and vehicle number and reported him to his sergeant".

                  That was you you little son%$%^#&*!!!


                  All joking aside kid lighten up a little.
                  "The price one pays for pursuing any profession, or calling, is an intimate knowledge of its ugly side."
                  .....James Baldwin
                  American Author.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Choppy
                    If the offence occurs while on duty, it should also be reported to that officer's supervisor.
                    It should, huh buddy? So that means that you write down the unit number of every 'speeding' marked unit that you see and call the patrol commander? I bet they really love you up there.

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                    • #11
                      Getting pulled over

                      I think it depends on where you are. Some areas of the country are good about professional courtesy, others are not. I was pulled over in my G-Ride (A Red 2001 Crown Vic with a full undercover lighting package, but unmarked) by a NC State Trooper. When he pulled me over he got angry that I activated the lights. I didn't get the tickett, but he was a jerk about it. The funny thing was that he knew I was a LEO bc he saw my dashking before the stop, but was thinking that I was a local officer from VA bc that is where my plates are from. I wonder what he would have done if I had been a VA officer out of state.
                      Live your Tactics, Hope is NOT a method!

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                      • #12
                        Above the law eh...

                        Those who are charged with enforcing the law should not be allowed to break it, even minorly. There is trust that goes into that position. When a person knowingly and unjustifiably breaks that trust, they should suffer even MORE dire consequences. The law needs respect. Those of you talking about "letting my wife off the hook" or "covering up" are just on your way down a stretch of road that inevitably leads to trouble. Oh, and Frank Booth, trying to initiate an ad hominem attack on Choppy is weak. I commend Choppy for passing that along to that officers supervisor. What a better way to make people hate cops even more than to not serve the public as equals.
                        -I don't feel you honor someone by creating a physical gesture (the salute). You honor them by holding them in memory and, in law enforcement, proceeding in vigilant, ethical police work. You honor this country or deceased soldiers or whatever you're honoring when you salute a flag by thinking, feeling, and continuing a life of freedom.

                        --ArkansasRed24

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                        • #13
                          My wife and I were driving through N.C. this past January (she was at the wheel) we were pushing the envelope admittedly. We were pulled over and the trooper approached the passenger side where I was sitting. He gave me the generic traffic stop greeting then asked my wife for her license etc. I then told him I was a police officer hoping for some courtesy and to ease the situation.
                          He said thats fine ill need the driver to step out of the vehicle. It was dark out and he had my wife stand on the median while he talked to her all the while shining his flashlight on the passenger mirror. I thought what a jerk. I found myself to be getting really ****ed off
                          and felt very disrespected. Without words he literally was telling me that I was in his town and me being a cop elsewhere didnt mean sh*t to him.She didnt get a ticket but was issued a written warning after about 15 minutes of bs.
                          If it were reversed I would have told his wife to just slow it down a little and have a good night. This guy had to make a production out of it. Must have been a slow night....
                          "The price one pays for pursuing any profession, or calling, is an intimate knowledge of its ugly side."
                          .....James Baldwin
                          American Author.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            djjack,

                            How's the view on your high horse?

                            Let me get this straight. I pull over a fellow officer, either from my job or another jurisdiction, an officer who I depend on and who depends on me to stay alive and I'm going to give them a ticket?! Sorry to disappoint you, I don't wear a red cape, I depend on other cops to keep me safe. Do you realistically believe a cop will get along with a co-worker who just cited him the night before on a traffic infraction? Gimme a break.

                            Speeding? I will give them a break everytime assuming they are respectful.

                            My 75 year old mother shouldn't speed but I wouldn't cite her either, is that acceptable? Or maybe I should call the Duty Supervisor to cite her instead.
                            Disclaimer: The writer does not represent any organization, employer, entity or other individual. The first amendment protected views/commentary/opinions/satire expressed are those only of the writer. In the case of a sarcastic, facetious, nonsensical, stirring-the-pot, controversial or devil's advocate-type post, the views expressed may not even reflect those of the writer.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Baker54
                              "My father and I took down the license and vehicle number and reported him to his sergeant".

                              That was you you little son%$%^#&*!!!


                              All joking aside kid lighten up a little.
                              It took him and his father to take down the LP# ?? Sounds like a good candidate for Federal work. Check out USAJOBS.

                              Comment

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