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Hardest part of being a rookie

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  • Hardest part of being a rookie

    Curious to see what was tough, or wasn't tough for you all. Personally i think remembering all the codes would be hard. I like to watch cops and Alaska State Troopers and hear all the codes being thrown out. Personally i think its so cool how the just click for them. My dad has an old police scanner from his department in his office i listen to periodically and try to put things together, only to still be lost.
    Nobody asks to be a hero, it just sometimes turns out that way.

  • #2
    Most of us don't use the 10 codes anymore and switched to plain English. The hardest part was the fear of getting it wrong for me. The academy doesn't teach you how to perform the essentials of being an officer. Only the FTO can do that, and "rookies" can have a hard time realizing that.

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    • #3
      do lots of departments have different 10 codes or do the codes stay the same everywhere?
      Nobody asks to be a hero, it just sometimes turns out that way.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by mikeymedic View Post
        Most of us don't use the 10 codes anymore and switched to plain English. The hardest part was the fear of getting it wrong for me. The academy doesn't teach you how to perform the essentials of being an officer. Only the FTO can do that, and "rookies" can have a hard time realizing that.
        I absolutely agree with the part about getting it wrong. I asked a million questions before finally one day my supervisor told me to stop. He said do what you think is right. Make mistakes and fix them after the fact. It was amazing how much more I knew than I thought. Not saying I know it all, but I would ask questions about basic, everyday stuff. It was stuff that I knew how to do but wanted clarification/acknowledgment that what I Was doing was right.

        Originally posted by TJake1990 View Post
        do lots of departments have different 10 codes or do the codes stay the same everywhere?
        Here in PA we're dispatched by our county. Each county has different 10 codes. My department doesn't use 10 codes, however, some of our neighboring departments use them frequently. For us, we still have to know them or be lost when others use them.
        Brad

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        • #5
          Coming from college, it was very hard to absorb all of the information at one time. The radio, watch your car, your gear, the bandit, your partner, and work a tough neighborhood. Very intimidating for a couple months till you get your feet wet. Good experience though.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by mikeymedic View Post
            The hardest part was the fear of getting it wrong for me. The academy doesn't teach you how to perform the essentials of being an officer. Only the FTO can do that, and "rookies" can have a hard time realizing that.
            Nicely said.

            The academy teaches you the basics. HOW to do certain things.
            That CJ degree teaches the theory of the profession.

            FTO teaches you how to do the job correctly.

            Been a long time since I was a rookie..............long time.

            Started a new job this month. Learning the routine things and the paperwork is the hardest things so far.

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            • #7
              Street locations.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by ArkansasFan24 View Post
                Street locations.
                I heard a 15 yr veteran ask for a cross street the other day on a hot call.

                (It wasn't on a new street either)----------------

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                • #9
                  Trying to figure out the co-workers you can trust, and weeding out the ones you can't.

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                  • #10
                    To: TJake1990............keep your mouth shut, listen and learn!

                    The hardest part for rookies is to not be a 'know-it-all' a-hole.......
                    "We sleep safe in our beds because rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would do us harm" -George Orwell

                    "It's 106 miles to Chicago, we've got a full tank of gas, half a pack of cigarettes, it's dark, and we're wearing diapers." - Blues Brothers

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                    • #11
                      Streets!!! Esp since I worked in a town I had been to only about 3 times before applying.
                      Originally posted by Ceridwen
                      Just one would be stingy of me, I'd have to get two. For the children.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Iowa #1603 View Post
                        I heard a 15 yr veteran ask for a cross street the other day on a hot call.

                        (It wasn't on a new street either)----------------
                        It happens to the best of them. In their old age they must forget.

                        Iowa, or anyone for that matter...Did you ever ask for cross streets and get "Dead End and" and right then you're like, oh crap. Then they tell you the an easy street and the relief sets in?
                        Brad

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                        • #13
                          nothing like "whats the cross streets"? and they give you the same street " jones st and jones st". Then you have to ask the closest main street and the block number and it always the opposite direction you are driving. I think getting a good radio ear was the hardest. You have to listen to the radio even when your talking to victims or suspects.

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                          • #14
                            First assignment out of the Academy was 'morning watch'. The hours were 10:30pm-6:30am. Trying to find my way around very dark streets was tough. On alot of the streets perps had turned the street signs around or stolen them. In the days before GPS this made things very difficult.
                            Judge me by the enemies I have made----Unknown

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Zeitgeist View Post
                              On alot of the streets perps had turned the street signs around or stolen them. In the days before GPS this made things very difficult.
                              Try working a rural county................gravel roads that were not even named...........................(pre 911 address days) Back when GPS wasn't even a dream.

                              You just learned. We had a map book with co-ordinate grids in my county..................But we were a large population county. The smaller ones just usually had the dispatcher give directions.

                              It really wasn't unusual to hear " Go two miles south of Howard's Corner, take a right and go five miles. Turn left and just past the bridge turn on the dirt road................and the house is somewhere down that road."

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