Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Detecting Stolen Vehicles Before Purchase

Collapse

300x250 Mobile

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Detecting Stolen Vehicles Before Purchase

    I am looking to buy a used pickup truck from a private seller in New Jersey. I have been told the standard procedures to verify that a vehicle is being sold by its legitimate owner. (Title check, serial number comparison throughout the vehicle, carfacts, etc) What I am wondering is is there any way to verify for sure that the vehicle is not stolen. I am concerned about the possibility of some of the documents being fake. According to my understanding, the buyer of a stolen vehicle will loose it and also be charged with a crime even if there was an attempt to verify its authenticity befoer buying it. I sthere any way to legally certify that the research has been done on the vehicle before buying? i am more concerned about the criminal charges that could result as a result of the vehicle being stolen than I am about loss of the vehicle.





    P.S. The carfacts report shows two owners, the most recent only having owned it for a month. The report from Checkthatvin.com shows one owner.

  • #2
    A clean title turned over to you is the main requirement.

    Should the title turn out to be a forgery, then the person that forged it (as well as anyone else involved in the transaction who had actual knowledge that it was forged and the transaction not legitimate) would be culpable.

    If you are honestly duped (the answer to that would come out during the investigation) you would not be criminally culpable as such charges require knowledge and "intent".

    Showing that you performed due dilligence (i.e. obtained a proper title, carfax, vin check, etc.) is pretty solid proof that you were uninvolved should the transaction be found to be illegal. This however won't save you if there happened to be evidence that you otherwise had knowledge of an illegal aspect of the transaction.

    Sorry for the skeptical answer, but cops are a skeptical bunch of people, and quickly learn to not take things at face value.

    -V
    Last edited by vincelli; 04-17-2011, 11:15 AM.

    Comment


    • #3
      carfax.....................CARFAX................. ..........Should be up to date.


      I suppose you could take the VIN number to your local licensing bureau and they could check it out---or maybe the police station during normal business hours.
      Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

      My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks for the replies. It was my understanding that when you buy a used vehicle you sign the title "in good faith." Was always told that this means that you take accountability for the vehicle and are therefore able to be criminally prosecuted for receiving stolen property if the vehicle happens to be a stolen one.

        As far as checking with a local police station, they told me over the phone that they don't just do that for people.

        The seller tells me that he bought the vehicle from an Estate sale of a neighbor who passed away. the carfacts report does not show the vehicle at any time belonging to a bank or auction that would have conducted the estate sale. Maybe there was already a provision in the will that granted power of Attorney to the auction with no need to transfer ownership?

        Could the vehicle be stolen but unreported due to the owner being deceased?

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by vincelli View Post
          A clean title turned over to you is the main requirement.
          The title should also be "clean" in the literal sense. If it's creased, greasy, and looks like it spent the last six months in somebody's hip pocket, find another deal.

          The seller tells me that he bought the vehicle from an Estate sale of a neighbor who passed away.
          In that case, the release of interest on the title should have been signed off by the estate's executor. The guy who's offering it to you should have transferred the title into his name. If he didn't, it at least means he's too lazy and cheap to follow proper procedures. Not a good sign.
          Last edited by Seventy2002; 04-17-2011, 11:42 AM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Jsw111 View Post
            Thanks for the replies. It was my understanding that when you buy a used vehicle you sign the title "in good faith." Was always told that this means that you take accountability for the vehicle and are therefore able to be criminally prosecuted for receiving stolen property if the vehicle happens to be a stolen one.

            As far as checking with a local police station, they told me over the phone that they don't just do that for people.

            The seller tells me that he bought the vehicle from an Estate sale of a neighbor who passed away. the carfacts report does not show the vehicle at any time belonging to a bank or auction that would have conducted the estate sale. Maybe there was already a provision in the will that granted power of Attorney to the auction with no need to transfer ownership?

            Could the vehicle be stolen but unreported due to the owner being deceased?


            Could be, should be, might be----you can play that game all night.

            PD won't do it.............Try the MV department where you get your license plates---they MIGHT

            Other than that ----you either buy the car or you don't..................................your decision .

            Once again it is CARFAX not CARFACTS.


            Personally I would pass unless it is in the name of the person I am buying it from
            Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

            My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Jsw111 View Post
              Thanks for the replies. It was my understanding that when you buy a used vehicle you sign the title "in good faith." Was always told that this means that you take accountability for the vehicle and are therefore able to be criminally prosecuted for receiving stolen property if the vehicle happens to be a stolen one.

              As far as checking with a local police station, they told me over the phone that they don't just do that for people.

              The seller tells me that he bought the vehicle from an Estate sale of a neighbor who passed away. the carfacts report does not show the vehicle at any time belonging to a bank or auction that would have conducted the estate sale. Maybe there was already a provision in the will that granted power of Attorney to the auction with no need to transfer ownership?

              Could the vehicle be stolen but unreported due to the owner being deceased?
              You still have to have knowledge and intent to be charged with possession/receiving of stolen property.

              Buy a vehicle at a normal price with a valid title after doing due-dilligence, carfax, etc. is one thing.

              Buying a $20k diamond ring on the street for $500 is quite another thing.

              One, you believe you are buying a legal vehicle. The other, even a 10 year old would have known it was stolen.

              -V

              Comment


              • #8
                OP, if you're not comfortable buying the vehicle from the private party you reference, simply don't make the purchase. I don't know how much more clear my colleagues could be in their replies. Do you absolutely have to have this vehicle? Take the normal, as in legal precautions. The law has been accurately quoted to you. CARFAX is one of the best auto tracking platforms out there today. If it didn't exist, it would have to be invented. Use it. Once more, if you're not comfortable making the purchase, don't do it.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Keep in mind that even Carfax can be duped, although the cases I'm aware of are more along the lines of concealing salvage titles by moving titles back and forth across state lines than concealing stolen status.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Iowa #1603 View Post
                    carfax.....................CARFAX................. ..........Should be up to date.


                    I suppose you could take the VIN number to your local licensing bureau and they could check it out---or maybe the police station during normal business hours.
                    Thats what I would do....walk the VIN into the local PD and ask them if its stolen....if it is, you will help them nab a car thief, if its not then you will know for sure
                    "I don't go on "I'maworthlesscumdumpster.com" and post negative **** about cum dumpsters."
                    The Tick

                    "Are you referring to the secret headquarters of a fictional crime fighter or penal complex slang for a-$$hole, anus or rectum?"
                    sanitizer

                    "and we all know you are a poser and a p*ssy.... "
                    Bearcat357 to Dinner Portion/buck8/long relief

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      If you are that worried that the vehicle is stolen, then walk away from it. You can get another car, and a good deal to go with it. It is not the only vehicle out there.
                      It could be that the purpose of your life is only to serve as a warning to others.

                      Comment

                      MR300x250 Tablet

                      Collapse

                      What's Going On

                      Collapse

                      There are currently 3166 users online. 184 members and 2982 guests.

                      Most users ever online was 26,947 at 07:36 PM on 12-29-2019.

                      Welcome Ad

                      Collapse
                      Working...
                      X