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  • Being mentally prepared

    Hello Officers, I have a question regarding mental focus and mindset. I'm currently an intern for a PD in Ohio. It's been an incredible experience so far and I'm counting down the days to starting academy in the fall. Throughout my internship, I've noticed how often officers have to go from 0-100-0mph (literally and figuratively) during a shift. We'll be sitting/patrolling for two hours, then driving code 3 to a call, then helping someone with a lockout. How do you prepare to handle the vastly varying range of emotional, physical and mental stresses you face during a 8-12 hour shift? Thanks so much for taking the time to respond.

    I just started reading “On Combat” by Lt. Col. Dave Grossman. Are there any other books or practices you would recommend, on how to prepare for the right kind of mindset?
    R.I.P. #2083, You will never be forgotten.

    Blessed are the peacemakers, for they shall be called sons of God. Matt. 5:9

    Inmates seem really into counting the number of officers it took to take them down. If only their love of math had blossomed earlier.

  • #2
    Your training and experience will go a long ways in mentally preparing you for what happens on a daily basis.
    Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

    My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

    Comment


    • #3
      ^^^this.

      When you do become a cop, and even before, start playing the "what if" game. When your just doing "routine" patrol start thinking about how you would handle certain situations. That way, when you do have to go from "directed patrol" to code 3 it is not a big shock to your system.

      The best way to handle the adrenaline dumps when responding to calls is to tell yourself one thing "it is not MY emergency."

      Comment


      • #4
        I use the breathing techniques described by Lt. Col. Grossman's speeches. I practiced them and now when a hot call or situation arises, I do it automatically. Like Iowa said, training and experience will go a long way with how your body reacts to certain situations. Your mindset is just as important, like mikeymedic said. Very good things to do. It sounds corny, but it works!
        "I sometimes wish that people would put a little more emphasis upon the observance of the law than they do upon its enforcement."
        -Calvin Coolidge

        "Amateurs train until they get it right. Professionals train until they can't get it wrong." - Unk

        Comment


        • #5
          +1 to what was already said. But, a book that has helped me in a lot of ways is Gavin De Becker's "Gift of Fear." Google it and see if it's something you'd be interested in. My bet is that you won't be disappointed.

          Comment


          • #6
            "On Killing" by the LT Col is also a good book,,,(IVE HEARD, as I have not yet read it myself fyi)

            "Emotional survival for Law Enforcement families" I THINK is the title of another, or something to that effect...good for loved ones to explain why we dont talk when get home.
            "I don't go on "I'maworthlesscumdumpster.com" and post negative **** about cum dumpsters."
            The Tick

            "Are you referring to the secret headquarters of a fictional crime fighter or penal complex slang for a-$$hole, anus or rectum?"
            sanitizer

            "and we all know you are a poser and a p*ssy.... "
            Bearcat357 to Dinner Portion/buck8/long relief

            Comment


            • #7
              may sound lame but Dale Carnegies, "how to win friends and influence people"...very old school but has assisted me in some situations
              "I don't go on "I'maworthlesscumdumpster.com" and post negative **** about cum dumpsters."
              The Tick

              "Are you referring to the secret headquarters of a fictional crime fighter or penal complex slang for a-$$hole, anus or rectum?"
              sanitizer

              "and we all know you are a poser and a p*ssy.... "
              Bearcat357 to Dinner Portion/buck8/long relief

              Comment


              • #8
                Thanks so much for the feedback, it is definitely appreciated! Mikey, on my last shift, the officer I report to told me he was going to start handing out a lot more “what if” scenarios. His first one was “WHAT IF you pay for lunch”... Crass, I'm definitely going to look into the book you recommended for some of my family. I'm the first one in my family to pursue this career and they've had a lot questions and concerns. Thanks again for response to my questions, they are all appreciated. I'll save my questions on buying old cop cars for a later time...
                R.I.P. #2083, You will never be forgotten.

                Blessed are the peacemakers, for they shall be called sons of God. Matt. 5:9

                Inmates seem really into counting the number of officers it took to take them down. If only their love of math had blossomed earlier.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Grenster, If you have or are planning on having a significant other, this book is good. It also it a good book for your family. YOU read it first...

                  "I Love a Cop" by Ellen Kirschman. It will help you and your family through the hiring process, throughout your career etc...

                  http://www.amazon.com/Love-Cop-What-.../dp/1572301937

                  Get the revised edition.
                  Last edited by LPD003; 04-18-2011, 05:38 PM. Reason: Addition
                  "I sometimes wish that people would put a little more emphasis upon the observance of the law than they do upon its enforcement."
                  -Calvin Coolidge

                  "Amateurs train until they get it right. Professionals train until they can't get it wrong." - Unk

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thanks, I'll check the book out for sure.
                    R.I.P. #2083, You will never be forgotten.

                    Blessed are the peacemakers, for they shall be called sons of God. Matt. 5:9

                    Inmates seem really into counting the number of officers it took to take them down. If only their love of math had blossomed earlier.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by crass cop View Post
                      "Emotional survival for Law Enforcement families" I THINK is the title of another, or something to that effect...good for loved ones to explain why we dont talk when get home.
                      http://www.emotionalsurvival.com/

                      Excellent book.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Crass and Chomp, Thanks. I will add that one to the list. Much appreciated everyone.
                        R.I.P. #2083, You will never be forgotten.

                        Blessed are the peacemakers, for they shall be called sons of God. Matt. 5:9

                        Inmates seem really into counting the number of officers it took to take them down. If only their love of math had blossomed earlier.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by grenster88 View Post
                          Hello Officers, I have a question regarding mental focus and mindset. I'm currently an intern for a PD in Ohio. It's been an incredible experience so far and I'm counting down the days to starting academy in the fall. Throughout my internship, I've noticed how often officers have to go from 0-100-0mph (literally and figuratively) during a shift. We'll be sitting/patrolling for two hours, then driving code 3 to a call, then helping someone with a lockout. How do you prepare to handle the vastly varying range of emotional, physical and mental stresses you face during a 8-12 hour shift? Thanks so much for taking the time to respond.

                          I just started reading “On Combat” by Lt. Col. Dave Grossman. Are there any other books or practices you would recommend, on how to prepare for the right kind of mindset?
                          Mental prepartion is a part of disicipline and as you get out on the street you start to thinking "what if" a lot. You have to always be prepared out here. Whenever I hear my partner call out, even if it's a building or area check that is clear, in the back of my mind I'm always thinking "If some crap hits the fan, what's the quickest route to back him up." You just got to be in that mindset.
                          <--- "The man"

                          Comment

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