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Which cities do not require U.S. citizenship

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  • Which cities do not require U.S. citizenship

    Hello,
    I am from northern Europe and I am considering moving to the USA in the next few months and I would like to know which states/cities do not require you to be a U.S. citizen to become a police officer?
    I will eventually apply for citizenship, but there are certain requirements that are needed to be met, such as living 5 years in the USA before applying.
    So I would like to obtain a permanent residence allowance, find a job to pay the rent and go through a police academy and after I graduate, I would like to apply for a job in a police department.
    Is there a website that lists every police department and their requirements?
    Thank you.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Fawkes View Post
    Hello,
    I am from northern Europe and I am considering moving to the USA in the next few months and I would like to know which states/cities do not require you to be a U.S. citizen to become a police officer?
    I will eventually apply for citizenship, but there are certain requirements that are needed to be met, such as living 5 years in the USA before applying.
    So I would like to obtain a permanent residence allowance, find a job to pay the rent and go through a police academy and after I graduate, I would like to apply for a job in a police department.
    Is there a website that lists every police department and their requirements?
    Thank you.
    Unless you already have immediate family here, you're not going to be moving here anytime soon. Instead of looking at the requirements to become a police officer, you should be looking at the requirements to immigrate to the United States.

    Comment


    • #3
      To be appointed as a peace officer in California, you must be a citizen of the United States or a permanent resident alien who is eligible for and has applied for citizenship. (Government Code Sections 1031 and 1031.5) Citizenship status must be conferred within three years of applying for citizenship. Additional citizenship requirements are stipulated for California Highway patrol officers, who must be U.S. citizens at the time of appointment (per Vehicle Code Section 2267).
      Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

      Comment


      • #4
        I don't see how this wouldn't be a nationwide policy.
        I'm 10-8 like a shark in a sea of crime..

        Comment


        • #5
          Good luck

          Every department will have a US Citizen requirement. You might also consider bringing a copy of your criminal record from the counrty you last resided in for the past 10 years.

          Visas
          Passports
          medical records
          high school deploma
          collage transcripts

          The list goes on and on but you need tons of documentation for the hiring process.
          This is for all you parents that like to put your kids names on the back of your mini-vans.

          STOP IT! There are predators that will use that information against them!

          Comment


          • #6
            You will have much better luck gaining civilian employment (dispatcher, detention officer, ect) if aren't a citizen. From there you can gain some experience and work your way up when you do finally get citizenship

            The vast majority of departments/states require US citizenship, even with those that don't you will have an uphill battle getting a police position if you aren't a citizen.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by SgtScott31 View Post
              I don't see how this wouldn't be a nationwide policy.
              As far as I understand, it isn't a federal law, rather an internal state affair, that you need to be a U.S. citizen to work in law enforcement, however most of the departments do require it.
              I found, for example, that Colorado Springs have more flexible requirements:
              http://www.springsgov.com/Page.aspx?...861&Print=True
              Code:
              You must be by the date of hire a US citizen, permanent resident alien, temporary resident alien, applicant for temporary resident status, refugee or asylee. All applicants that are offered employment must provide documents to establish their identity and employment eligibility for authorization to work in the U.S.
              Originally posted by madchiken View Post
              you should be looking at the requirements to immigrate to the United States.
              Yes, I have been reading up on this subject for the past few weeks, and it seems that those immigration requirements were meant to keep everybody out, making them extremely hard to meet, unless you already have friends/sponsors/family living the USA. But if you want to start a new life, working your way up, then you must be very wealthy, taking in consideration that you need a green card to find a job, but prior to that you still need to pay your rent, have money for basic things such as food, medicine and similar. But to become a permanent resident, at the very least you need a labor certification obtained by your employer.
              Though, I have found that by enlisting in U.S. military, your citizenship process can be accelerated, if you're serving for at least 3 years (I might be wrong, haven't had time to read a lot about it). Also, military isn't such a bad thing, from my perspective, I would receive training that would only benefit myself physical and mentally, also would look good on a resume, if I were to apply in a police department later.


              Originally posted by ummone View Post
              You might also consider bringing a copy of your criminal record from the counrty you last resided in for the past 10 years.
              I don't have any criminal record, I try to live an honest life, taking in consideration my surrounding people, when I'm making decisions. That is one of the reasons I would like to work in law enforcement.

              Comment


              • #8
                Here is some information on gaining U.S. citizenship via the military services:

                Citizenship
                Be courteous to all, but intimate with few, and let those few be well tried before you give them your confidence!

                [George Washington (1732 - 1799)]

                Comment


                • #9
                  In Iowa you must be a citizen of the United States

                  http://www.legis.state.ia.us/ACO/IAC...m#rule_501_2_1

                  501—2.1(80B) General requirements for law enforcement officers. In no case shall any person hereafter be selected or appointed as a law enforcement officer unless the person:

                  2.1(1) Is a citizen of the United States and a resident of Iowa or intends to become a resident upon being employed; provided that, with the approval of the Iowa law enforcement academy council, a city located on a state border that is within a standard metropolitan statistical area may allow officers to reside in an adjacent state within that statistical area upon written application by the agency administrator to the council showing substantial reason and documenting undue hardship. Railway special agents who are approved by the commissioner of public safety as special agents of the department shall be exempt from the Iowa residency requirement.
                  Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

                  My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    You are on the right track if you truly want to serve in the military.

                    With a clear criminal record, citizenship and military experience in your back pocket, you would make a pretty good candidate at most police departments.

                    Added: Looks like Latvians are eligible for the green card lottery, you might get lucky. Just avoid the scams, I would contact the Latvian embassy or US State department and get any information directly from them.
                    Last edited by Dingo990; 04-14-2011, 09:14 AM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      We aren't keeping people out. We are keeping out people who would otherwise be a burden on the taxpayer. If you feel so slighted, then stay out and work in Latvia or an EU agency that will employ you. The United States doesn't exist to provide jobs for the world.
                      Free Deke O'Mally!!!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Fawkes View Post
                        As far as I understand, it isn't a federal law, rather an internal state affair, that you need to be a U.S. citizen to work in law enforcement, however most of the departments do require it.
                        I found, for example, that Colorado Springs have more flexible requirements:
                        http://www.springsgov.com/Page.aspx?...861&Print=True
                        Code:
                        You must be by the date of hire a US citizen, permanent resident alien, temporary resident alien, applicant for temporary resident status, refugee or asylee. All applicants that are offered employment must provide documents to establish their identity and employment eligibility for authorization to work in the U.S.


                        Yes, I have been reading up on this subject for the past few weeks, and it seems that those immigration requirements were meant to keep everybody out, making them extremely hard to meet, unless you already have friends/sponsors/family living the USA. But if you want to start a new life, working your way up, then you must be very wealthy, taking in consideration that you need a green card to find a job, but prior to that you still need to pay your rent, have money for basic things such as food, medicine and similar. But to become a permanent resident, at the very least you need a labor certification obtained by your employer.
                        Though, I have found that by enlisting in U.S. military, your citizenship process can be accelerated, if you're serving for at least 3 years (I might be wrong, haven't had time to read a lot about it). Also, military isn't such a bad thing, from my perspective, I would receive training that would only benefit myself physical and mentally, also would look good on a resume, if I were to apply in a police department later.




                        I don't have any criminal record, I try to live an honest life, taking in consideration my surrounding people, when I'm making decisions. That is one of the reasons I would like to work in law enforcement.
                        Well, I can see the making of one more happy O.com customer. Fawkes, try to keep in mind that we didn't, we don't write the rules on citizenship, Congress does. U.S. Citizenship is not an entitlement. You'll have to meet some standards, and jump through some hoops. With respect to employment as a Law Enforcement Officer, the State of Alabama mandates U.S. Citizenship. It's evident you've done some research on this subject, so why argue with us when we provide you honest, good faith replies? Address your inquiries to those jurisdictions which may not require U.S. Citizenship. They, in conjunction with U.S. Immigration authorities will advise you of what documentation and status will be required for you to be employed in any capacity in the United States. Perhaps you should look into Law Enforcement opportunities in Latvia, as right now, in the United States, many jurisdictions are laying Officers off, or simply not hiring.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Fawkes View Post
                          I don't have any criminal record, I try to live an honest life, taking in consideration my surrounding people, when I'm making decisions. That is one of the reasons I would like to work in law enforcement.
                          Irregardless of your statement...bring the blank paper copy of your criminal record. My department requires a paper copy of criminal records from every state you have lived in.

                          I have a paper criminal record in my employment file. Other than my personal information and the state seal the paper is blank.

                          We won't take your word on it in the hiring process.
                          Last edited by ummone; 04-15-2011, 02:52 AM.
                          This is for all you parents that like to put your kids names on the back of your mini-vans.

                          STOP IT! There are predators that will use that information against them!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            The military route is a good one. Quickest way to citizenship. Not to mention your language skills will be a plus to certain police departments.

                            Your best bet is to visit the nearest US embassy/consulate. They will be able to give you the most accurate information and you will be able to avoid all of the scams.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I am a naturalized American citizen, from an EU country, who served in the US Army before becoming a police officer.

                              You will find that actually becoming a cop is the last in a long series of hurdles when it comes to immigrating legally to the USA and finding an LE job.

                              First you need to apply for permission to come to the USA and live. Go and see the US consulate or embassy in your home country. As you have already found out, you need to have significant assets to even be granted a vistor's visa, unless you're a citizen of a country who shares a visa-free arrangement with the USA - never mind trying to come here to live & work.

                              Citizens of former Combloc and eastern European countries don't get the same privileges as people from western Europe.

                              Unless you have an extraordinary skill, it'll be hard for you to get an H1B visa, never mind a permanent resident 'green card' This is where the green card lottery comes in... apply, cross your fingers, and wait.

                              If you get a green card, come here and get a job, then you can apply for US citizenship after 5 years, then apply to any police dept. in the USA. Otherwise, you're limited to 1 or 2 states --- it's been a few years since this question last came up, and since each of our 50 states set their own rules, there are 1 or 2 places where a green card holder/permanent resident can get hired. It is very uncommon though.

                              If you want join the military then the 5 year wait for citizenship is waived, but you still have to have a green card. Foreigners who don't have the right to live and work in the USA cannot join the military.

                              I have been here for 20+ years. I work with South Africans, Colombians, Chinese, and Vietnamese ... all of whom came here after waiting for YEARS for a visa. It's a long road.

                              Comment

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