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  • Policing the Mentally Ill

    What kind of training takes place concerned with the mentally ill. Here in Canada too many police officers die. Too many patients die.

    http://www.cmha.bc.ca/files/policereport.pdf

  • #2
    I'll tell you what I think a major part of the problem is, at least from a personal perspective. About thirty or so years ago, some "genius" decided and sold it to cash strapped state governments, that some mental patients could function outside of the institutional setting. No doubt some could and still can. However, the success of such programs depended largely on the patient becoming responsible for taking his own medication(s), responding to appointments with mental health professionals etc. In all too many cases, the patient simply could not, simply would not do this. This often goes to the very reason the individual was committed to an institutional setting in the first place.I suppose at the end of the day it's a matter of priorities. Treatment of mental illness doesn't really sit at the top of budgetary considerations in the U.S. Much rhetoric is directed at the problem, but very little substance in terms of funding. I don't for one minute imagine that my scenario even begins to address the problem, but possibly it might give you a hint of one of the causes. Once more, I can't address the problem from a Canadian perspective, except to suggest that provinces and cities in Canada may treat mental illness in a manner similar to what I've suggested.

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    • #3
      My dept. has a mental evaluation team. They pair up a deputy with a psych nurse/tech and they respond to requests from field units county wide to deal with mental patients.
      Today's Quote:

      "The difference between stupidity and genius is that genius has its limits."
      Albert Einstein

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      • #4
        One of the problems in our society is , like PhilipCal stated, is that most mental health facilities are now out patient or only designed for residential services for patients who are "actively dangerous". By actively dangerous I mean to either themselves or to others.

        Once their ---------I'll use the term MANIC----phase is over , they are released to live in the community and given "out patient" treatment.

        They are then the problem of law enforcement when they "break".

        The countries prisons are full of inmates that would be better served in a long term residential mental health facility. Instead their actions (which are criminal in the community) are criminalized and they are pushed off onto the Corrections system. Corrections as a whole is not geared toward the chronically mental ill inmate. But we are learning---------and spending a considerable amount of resources on these inmates.
        Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

        My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by PhilipCal View Post
          I'll tell you what I think a major part of the problem is, at least from a personal perspective. About thirty or so years ago, some "genius" decided and sold it to cash strapped state governments, that some mental patients could function outside of the institutional setting. No doubt some could and still can. However, the success of such programs depended largely on the patient becoming responsible for taking his own medication(s), responding to appointments with mental health professionals etc. In all too many cases, the patient simply could not, simply would not do this. This often goes to the very reason the individual was committed to an institutional setting in the first place.I suppose at the end of the day it's a matter of priorities. Treatment of mental illness doesn't really sit at the top of budgetary considerations in the U.S. Much rhetoric is directed at the problem, but very little substance in terms of funding. I don't for one minute imagine that my scenario even begins to address the problem, but possibly it might give you a hint of one of the causes. Once more, I can't address the problem from a Canadian perspective, except to suggest that provinces and cities in Canada may treat mental illness in a manner similar to what I've suggested.
          Who's to blame? The mental health patients or is it systemic? I beleive it was under the Reagan administration that promoted deinstitutionlization and Canada followed suit.

          Comment


          • #6
            I believe it began long before the Reagan Administration. Let me offer you an additional perspective. In my career with the Alabama Department of Public Safety, I worked for something like seven different Governors. We had tough on crime Governors, we had Tourism Governors, we had Governors who wanted to run the state like a business, we had education Governors. I don't recall ever working for, or hearing about a "Mental Health Governor" . It's not a vote getter. It doesn't win elections. Talk crime, talk highways, talk education, you get attention, you get votes. Talk mental health, no one really cares........unless it effects them directly. Systemic? I wont argue with that, but I'm not holding my breath waiting for a fix either.

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            • #7
              Georgia has a state Crisis Intervention Team that I just finished my training for a few weeks ago. We went to several mental health facilities, talked with several consumers (what they like to be called), and learned skills to better deal with them while they are in crisis. To graduate, we had to pass 2 days of role play training and a written test.
              Originally posted by Ceridwen
              Just one would be stingy of me, I'd have to get two. For the children.

              Comment


              • #8
                <-----CIT certified and Hostage/Crisis Negotiator
                I've had very extensive training in dealing w/ the mentally ill
                Judge me by the enemies I have made----Unknown

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                • #9
                  I'm a CIT trained officer as well, about a week long class. Rule #1 is safety comes first. We can talk it out if the situation allows, but even if your actions are due to mental illness I can't let you compromise the safety of yourself, others, or me. People don't like the analogy, but its not a mad dog's fault he's mad, but you don't let him play with your kids.

                  The vast majority of contacts I've had with the mentally ill have been resolved peacefully, but when things do down hill they are among the toughest resistors to get under control.
                  I miss you, Dave.
                  http://www.odmp.org/officer/20669-of...david-s.-moore

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                  • #10
                    What I'm sick of in my state is that usually we, the Police, are left to deal with the hot potato of someone who's mentally ill. Very little resources are available to us. But here's the big thing that it seems far too many cops forget... I don't care if the person is "healthy" or on a massive manic bipolar streak, if they get combative or violent, YOU take care of business. Don't drop your guard, and do what you have to do to get home safe
                    www.saveavet.org

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by dogcop View Post
                      What I'm sick of in my state is that usually we, the Police, are left to deal with the hot potato of someone who's mentally ill. Very little resources are available to us. But here's the big thing that it seems far too many cops forget... I don't care if the person is "healthy" or on a massive manic bipolar streak, if they get combative or violent, YOU take care of business. Don't drop your guard, and do what you have to do to get home safe
                      Agree totally. Your last three sentences are especially important and very true. That's the reality soooo many people simply cannot, simply will not understand.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Well for me dealing with nut bars, we had one incident all too real. Just the other day we had a bipolar who was hanging around in our lobby. The bosses decided to let her stay the night, even though she was acting totally nuts. Well by the time day shift got on it was decided something finally needed to be done. An ambulance was called to the lobby and as two of our officers were helping her to the paramedics she pulled out a pen and stabbed one of our guys in the cheek not missing his eye by much. After that she then scratches the hell out of the other officer's face. She was then finally taken under control. When asked why didn't you knock her the hell out after she pulled out the pen, the answer was, "we thought it would look bad on camera.". Wha?!?!?!?!?! Now we aren't trying to MMQB them, but that is not the right answer. As soon as the pen came out, my fist would have been planted squarely in her cranium, I'm not doing the square dance with a nut. Also, about a year ago, a Chicago Officer was killed by his own gun when a large mental woman disarmed him. I don't care if they are diagnosed as "sick", you present a danger to me, you are being taken care off.

                        Look at her mugshot, she doesn't seem real broken up over it.
                        http://triblocal.com/bolingbrook/201...cers-with-pen/
                        Last edited by dogcop; 04-13-2011, 10:09 PM.
                        www.saveavet.org

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by dogcop View Post
                          What I'm sick of in my state is that usually we, the Police, are left to deal with the hot potato of someone who's mentally ill. Very little resources are available to us. But here's the big thing that it seems far too many cops forget... I don't care if the person is "healthy" or on a massive manic bipolar streak, if they get combative or violent, YOU take care of business. Don't drop your guard, and do what you have to do to get home safe
                          And like I have stated before, they are mentally ill, what do you think is going to happen to them in court after your funeral?

                          Originally posted by dogcop View Post
                          Well for me dealing with nut bars, we had one incident all too real. Just the other day we had a bipolar who was hanging around in our lobby. The bosses decided to let her stay the night, even though she was acting totally nuts. Well by the time day shift got on it was decided something finally needed to be done. An ambulance was called to the lobby and as two of our officers were helping her to the paramedics she pulled out a pen and stabbed one of our guys in the cheek not missing his eye by much. After that she then scratches the hell out of the other officer's face. She was then finally taken under control. When asked why didn't you knock her the hell out after she pulled out the pen, the answer was, "we thought it would look bad on camera.". Wha?!?!?!?!?! Now we aren't trying to MMQB them, but that is not the right answer. As soon as the pen came out, my fist would have been planted squarely in her cranium, I'm not doing the square dance with a nut. Also, about a year ago, a Chicago Officer was killed by his own gun when a large mental woman disarmed him. I don't care if they are diagnosed as "sick", you present a danger to me, you are being taken care off.

                          Look at her mugshot, she doesn't seem real broken up over it.
                          http://triblocal.com/bolingbrook/201...cers-with-pen/
                          You upper staff should be reprimanded for letting this situation happen.
                          Pete Malloy, "The only thing black and white about this job is the car."

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Look at her mugshot, she doesn't seem real broken up over it.
                            http://triblocal.com/bolingbrook/201...cers-with-pen/

                            Her smile sickens me.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I am an Emergency Psychological Technician(EPT). Everyone in our department went to an intensive training course by given NYPD and John Jay College of Criminal Justice. We got the training when we started doing Kendra's Law removals.

                              If anyone is interested.
                              http://www.jjay.cuny.edu/academics/731.php
                              “Every society gets the kind of criminal it deserves. What is equally true is that every community gets the kind of law enforcement it insists on.” - Robert F. Kennedy.

                              Comment

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